• Silver Line Dulles WMATA Metrorail progress/pictures

  • Discussion related to DC area passenger rail services from Northern Virginia to Baltimore, MD. Includes Light Rail and Baltimore Subway.
Discussion related to DC area passenger rail services from Northern Virginia to Baltimore, MD. Includes Light Rail and Baltimore Subway.

Moderators: mtuandrew, therock, Robert Paniagua

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  by Sand Box John
 
mackievlzpro
All 3 were 7Ks, one 8 car train, and two 4 car trains. Progress!


Interesting. Startup testing was done in the past with a combination of 1 and 2k cars to establish a baseline to compare against previous startup testing.
  by mackievlzpro
 
Sand Box John wrote: Mon Oct 12, 2020 11:02 am mackievlzpro
All 3 were 7Ks, one 8 car train, and two 4 car trains. Progress!


Interesting. Startup testing was done in the past with a combination of 1 and 2k cars to establish a baseline to compare against previous startup testing.
That could have be the case here too. I used to take the Greenway daily but not anymore, so its possible I missed some earlier testing.
  by Sand Box John
 
mackievlzpro
That could have be the case here too. I used to take the Greenway daily but not anymore, so its possible I missed some earlier testing.


When I say compare against previous startup testing I mean startup testing on previous new segments going back to the 1980s. The performance profile of the 7k cars is different then the older rolling stock.
  by west point
 
Lets hope that ban also includes all persons involved with the substandard manufacturing and cover up. That includes them working for any other company that may have federal funds contracts.
  by JDC
 
Rode the Metro for the first time since March and noticed a few things, including that the stations on the B/O/S line through DC all have updated their signage (the big wall plaques). They now say "Ashburn" next to the SV decal. With the extra space from dropping "Wiehle-Reston East", the language for Vienna is "Vienna-Fairfax-GMU", which I don't recall it saying before.
  by JDC
 
Metro is now projecting that Phase II will not open until fall 2021, at the earliest. The numerous outstanding issues were discussed at a recent meeting. https://www.wmata.com/about/board/meeti ... Update.pdf. Reston Now has a detailed summary. https://www.restonnow.com/2020/12/15/si ... fall-2021/
  by Sand Box John
 
daybeers
Welp, that doesn't come as a surprise unfortunately. Stupid contractors.


Me thinks WMATA's prediction of lower ridership then what was projected before the pandemic may also be one of the reasons. Cheaper in the long run to wait for the ridership to at least partly recover then run mostly empty trains.
  by perfbill
 
Wondering about moving forward, now that we have a new administration (and one that embraces rail travel) about one of the economies of this pending extension. Several evenings over the past couple of months I have made my way down 267 and seen parking garages, stations and walkways lit up, even at very late hours. Also, the rails appear to be electrified (blue lights) and signals on. When in operation I understand the efficacy of keeping the wheels greased, so to speak.

However, in the three Loudoun garages, which were paid for by Loudoun County bonds, there is still no parking. Yet they remain lit. When Metro (who I understand does not have the keys in hand) is talking about drastic austerity, in the interim, who is paying for all of this electricity? There must be some savings. Blocking off the garages and using even half the lighting with night vision cameras should be able to tackle any nefarious activity that otherwise exists there - or perhaps even lights triggered by motion detectors (such as frozen food at Harris Teeter). Same with the walkways and outer parking. If they are not running trains daily, is there a way for the transformers to remain primed without using excess power to electrify unused or barely-used rails? The savings would not be tremendous, but they would be savings. I think that while many of the lights are LED, some are still halogen or similar.

There is also the part about WMATA and/or airport authority setting a good example, the energy equivalent of "wear the damn mask." So who is paying for this, and the answer is probably us through taxes or other means. The contractor can focus on fixing/replacing stuff they screwed up without spending money lighting up empty spaces.

If someone here has light to shed (metaphorically) I'd like to learn more. Thanks. Bill Edwards
  by Sand Box John
 
perfbill
Several evenings over the past couple of months I have made my way down 267 and seen parking garages, stations and walkways lit up, even at very late hours. Also, the rails appear to be electrified (blue lights) and signals on. When in operation I understand the efficacy of keeping the wheels greased, so to speak.


This has been pretty much standard procedure sense day one. Once the switch is thrown everything remains on 24/7/365. The energy costs are in the project contract. the rates being paid are base on the rates WMATA pays once they take possession of project. Being that there is no scheduled train operations, the escalators are not running and the elevators are not being used, the power being consumed is a fraction of what would be used during revenue operations.
  by Sand Box John
 
Closer to an opening date:

Officials push for Silver Line extension opening in July
Jonathan Capriel
Washington Business Journal
01 26 2021
The Silver Line's $2.8 billion second phase is currently set to open on July 1, and is expected to cost cash-strapped WMATA almost $36.5 million to operate during its first 12 months. (1.8 MB PDF file)
  by Sand Box John
 
daybeers
Interesting! How does the $36.5 million compare to the operational costs of the other lines?


Other lines is not an honest comparison because the $36.5 million is just for the cost of the 6 new stations along 11.5 miles surface line and the yard which is comparable to the functions done at Greenbelt Yard.
  by Sand Box John
 
Looks like opening may not be as early as July after all.

From 02 25 2021 Dulles Corridor Metrorail Project Newsletter
In addition, the tie-in of the second phase to the first phase at the Wiehle-Reston East must be completed before turning the project over to the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA). This will require another temporary shutdown of existing rail service at Wiehle-Reston East as well as major coordination between contractors and WMATA.

Additional dynamic and other final testings will follow before the project is ready to turnover to WMATA. After turnover happens WMATA then will conduct its own pre-revenue testing, which is expected to take about five months.
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