• Potential MBTA Southern NH Service

  • Discussion relating to commuter rail, light rail, and subway operations of the MBTA.
Discussion relating to commuter rail, light rail, and subway operations of the MBTA.

Moderators: sery2831, CRail

  by CRail
 
Why should a Massachusetts agency fund a study regarding another state's rail service?
  by BandA
 
Requires work on both sides of the border, therefore there should be two studies!!
  by CRail
 
There will not be any additional service offered within the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. I thought you were opposed to frivolous spending.
  by BandA
 
Unlike the MA state government and their employees I am against wasting money, but can't see NH paying for a study of track conditions in MA. But if this is a NH led project I guess they would have to. If they forgo Nashua / Bedford/ Merrimack / Concord and only do the state line station in South Nashua - would NH have to pay for service from Lowell to South Nashua or just the fraction of a mile that is in NH?
  by CRail
 
The path for the service is not important. NH needs to pay for the cost associated with getting service TO their stop. As far as the infrastructure goes, it's T property up to state line, track upgrades to that point are the responsibility of MA. The T doesn't need to study track upgrades. Economic, environmental, and feasibility studies (all of which I think are ridiculous) are NH's to do.
  by mbrproductions
 
CRail wrote:Economic, environmental, and feasibility studies (all of which I think are ridiculous) are NH's to do.
I agree, it's what screwed over South Coast Rail so badly
  by BowdoinStation
 
CRail wrote: Mon Mar 11, 2024 11:24 am The path for the service is not important. NH needs to pay for the cost associated with getting service TO their stop. As far as the infrastructure goes, it's T property up to state line, track upgrades to that point are the responsibility of MA. The T doesn't need to study track upgrades. Economic, environmental, and feasibility studies (all of which I think are ridiculous) are NH's to do.
Commuter rail in NH has been studied, studied and studied.. A few years back, NH, through a Federal Grant that was at no cost to the NH Taxpayer, studied what it would take to build, operate, who would ride it, and how much would it all cost. I believe the NH legislature put an end to future commuter rail studies. At the present time, The NH State Gov't, seems to have zero interest in putting up the state's portion of the federal funding to build it, maintain it, and pay the MBTA operate the service. Granite Staters will have suffer in traffic to Boston for the foreseeable future.
  by Red Wing
 
BandA wrote: Sat Mar 09, 2024 8:13 pm Unlike the MA state government and their employees I am against wasting money,
As an employee of the Commonwealth I can tell you we do our best to not waste your money. If you feel we are wasting your money have the lawmakers change the laws that call for the studies.
  by mbrproductions
 
ARTICLE: "How SNHU Could Be Connected By Passenger Rail"
https://penmenpress.com/2024/02/19/how- ... nger-rail/
SNHUdents who have lived on the west side of campus know about the train tracks running along the Merrimack River. However, most do not know that those train tracks run far up north and south. It’s called the New Hampshire Main Line, and it runs 50 miles from Lowell, MA to Concord, NH. It connects the three largest cities in New Hampshire: Manchester, Nashua, and Concord, respectively.

If a passenger rail was implemented between all of these cities, it would enable travel by train for more than 250,000 New Hampshire residents (American Community Survey, 2022). For SNHU, this means commuters could access campus without having to drive.

The possibility of intercity rail travel might not be distant; a project is underway called the Capital Corridor, a collaboration between NHDOT and the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) to extend the commuter rail service from Lowell to Manchester. It would use 9 miles of MBTA’s existing track and 21 miles of NH Main Line track, currently owned by Pan Am railways. Along with train service would come four new commuter rail stations: South Nashua, NH (Pheasant Lane Mall), Downtown Nashua (Crown St, off of E Hollis St), Bedford, NH/MHT Station (South River Rd, under the Airport Access Road) and Downtown Manchester, NH (off of Elm St, next to Market Basket).
  by jamoldover
 
jbvb wrote: Wed Feb 28, 2024 9:34 pm while rail trails that share with active rail exist I've never seen one, and I'm not sure there are any in New England.
Try the Blackstone Bikeway that parallels the P&W from Woonsocket south for a number of miles that runs along the second track's ROW - and even shares bridge piers with the active main line. Granted, there aren't that many trains running along it, but it's very much both an active rail line with trail and certainly in New England.
  by HenryAlan
 
There are also two rail trails in Boston that parallel active and busy rights of way. The new Community Path extension follows the MBTA Lowell line for about two miles in to Somerville. And the Neponset River Greenway follows the Mattapan High Speed Line for about 1.5 miles.

Some might argue that the Southwest Corridor bike path also falls in to this category, but I think it's not so clear when the route was widened for the purpose of building a freeway, and then the new ROW repurposed as a park.
  by BandA
 
How do they prevent ballast stones from hitting the cyclists in the eye? Barriers? They would also be paranoid about giving even easier access to the ROW. So at a minimum full fencing between the active track and the bike path
  by jamoldover
 
Here are a few photos along the Blackstone River bike path showing where it's running alongside the P&W tracks:
https://i0.wp.com/everywherewoman.com/w ... 1232&ssl=1 The tracks are on the other side of the chain-link fence.
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/75/29/7a ... c7141a.jpg Same here - you can see the tracks.

A couple of overhead views (from the Rails-Trails Conservancy):
https://www.flickr.com/photos/railstotrails/40121892751
https://www.flickr.com/photos/railstotrails/39222545825
https://www.flickr.com/photos/railstotrails/39222546695

In a few places the barrier fencing is a bit lower, but those are at least a couple of examples.
  by newpylong
 
In New York there is also a trail that shares the right of way with the CP D&H Main for around 5 miles between Glenville and Ballston Lake.
  by The EGE
 
In Groton, Connecticut, a trail at Bluff Point State Park runs along the fenceline of the Northeast Corridor for about a third of a mile. The centerlines of the trail and the south NEC track are about 18 feet apart. This might be the highest-speed rail-with-trail in the country - the Acela is allowed 90 mph on that segment. There doesn't seem to be any issue with stones and dust being kicked up there.
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