• Acela II (Alstom Avelia Liberty): Design, Production, Delivery, Acceptance

  • Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.
Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, mtuandrew, Tadman

  by west point
 
STrRedWolf wrote: Fri Jun 02, 2023 8:40 am There is, and there isn't. Folks leave with that knowledge and never write it down or pass it on. Organizations also get out of the industry. Remember Budd? After taking a soaking on MTA Maryland's subway cars, they got out.
The thinking appears to be. Those past idiots did not know this newly invented wheel will solve all those past problems. Guess what new wheel does not work.
  by sfmartinw
 
RandallW wrote: Fri Jun 09, 2023 4:30 am There have always been simulations used for the design of this train. My comment about changing it is they may have found a situation where the simulation diverges from observed real world behavior, and they feel a need to fix the simulator to test possible designs before (I am making this example up) redesigning the brake calipers to prevent uncommanded contact between the drum and caliper wear from unexpected vibrations at 130+ MPH on certain track structures.

Having (finally) read the full Washington Post article, the need for simulation is: FRA requires the results of the simulation before authorizing real world testing, so the process for fixing a design is roughly:
  1. Run simulations of proposed fixes
  2. Manufacture preferred fix
  3. Develop test plan
  4. Submit results of simulation to FRA with test plan
  5. Wait for FRA to review simulation results
  6. Get approval to test
  7. Run tests
  8. Submit results to FRA
  9. Get approval to operate (ATO) or if ATO is not granted, determine fixes needed for ATO and repeat this process
Thank you, Randall. Yours was one of the more insightful and complete responses I've encountered in a while.
  by RandallW
 
Speaking of new passenger equipment having an interesting problem and fix... (free to read, but need to register)

While I don't think the problem with the GoldenPass Express is the Avelia Liberty's problem, the problems the GoldenPass Express had and its solution do point to the complexities and subtleties that could be involved.
  by electricron
 
Another point to consider in the USA with HSR operations is that anytime you are operating at speeds over 125 mph you are in no man’s land with the FRA because every rule to do so is on a case by case basis. Your equipment is bespoke, so are your regulations. So every change you make or must make is scruntized to the highest level by the FRA.
  by TheOneKEA
 
I'd be curious to know if the heat and humidity that the Mid-Atlantic region has been dealing with for the past several weeks has disrupted the Avelia Liberty testing to any great extent. It seems like it would be a good opportunity to run a set over hot running rails to see how the bogies, suspension and tilting equipment react to track that is approaching its maximum stressing temperature.
  by Matt Johnson
 
TheOneKEA wrote: Sun Jul 09, 2023 8:12 pm I'd be curious to know if the heat and humidity that the Mid-Atlantic region has been dealing with for the past several weeks has disrupted the Avelia Liberty testing to any great extent.
They don't seem to be testing them at all and haven't been for some time. Every now and then they'll take a set out of Philly and run it up to Boston or down to DC for whatever reason for a day or two, but that's about it.
  by Railjunkie
 
STrRedWolf wrote: Tue Aug 29, 2023 7:12 pm Stumbled across video posted today of trainset #5 going back to Alstom for who knows what.
https://youtu.be/5UqQ82T-X6Y?si=AUukhOEBG9UdCqBC
That was due through Albany around 3AM Monday morning. Do not know what is wrong with it other than the couple of hundred things reported by engineers who have tested the sets. That video reminds of the last turbo before they were rebuilt by Stuper Steal.
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
Mr. Junkie, wouldn't it be nice if all Amtrak equipment procurements could be the Amfleets and F-40 where the manufacturer simply says "this is what you get, this it what it will cost you, and this is when you'll get it. Take it or leave it".

Funny how both those procurements were on the property, on time, and on budget.

But then I guess with a bureaucracy that is constantly playing the Abbott and Costello "Who's On First" skit, such is too much to ask.
  by Railjunkie
 
Mr. Norman the F40s and Amfleets where built old school with a little help from a computer. Analog on the inside no waiting on a computer to decided yes/no. Todays stuff relies on a computer to tell a computer to think about telling another computer to turn off the marker lights. Its like Tron in there they should have given it a game to play while its bouncing down the railroad.
Lets not even discuss how "too many cooks spoil the soup," I mean its happened before with another high speed train set in this country...
  by 8th Notch
 
Every time I ran one of the sets and made a suggestion, was told “it cost too much money to fix…” I would love to know how much the company didn’t listen to the BLET representatives that went to France when these things were being developed.
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