Door buzzer codes

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gmbfly98
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Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2011 4:19 pm

Door buzzer codes

Post by gmbfly98 » Sat Apr 09, 2011 4:34 pm

I'm trying to find some information on the door buzzer codes used on the MNCR, but I haven't been very successful in my searching. Just from observation, I know 2 buzzes means "all clear" (or something to that effect), and 3 means "back up". I've also noticed when they are using platform extenders, 1 buzz apparently means "close to platform".

Are there any more codes in use, and what are the more correct names for those codes? Also, is this something railroad-specific, or is there a general rule regarding the door buzzer?

Amtrak7
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Re: Door buzzer codes

Post by Amtrak7 » Sat Apr 09, 2011 8:36 pm

The door buzzer is officially called the "communicating signal appliance".

From NORAC (not MNR rules):

One long buzz means to stop, or to apply/release brakes when stopped.
Two short buzzes means to start.
Three short buzzes means to back up, or when already moving forward, stop at next station.
Four short buzzes means brake test complete
One short buzz means to prepare to stop

http://www.amtrakengineer.net/NORAC90408.pdf; PDF pages 29–30

DutchRailnut
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Re: Door buzzer codes

Post by DutchRailnut » Sat Apr 09, 2011 8:38 pm

The Communicating signals are pretty much universal in Railroad industry, codes are same for GCOR, NORAC, MNCR , etc
If Conductors are in charge, why are they promoted to be Engineer???

Retired Triebfahrzeugführer. I am not a moderator.

Amtrak7
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Re: Door buzzer codes

Post by Amtrak7 » Sat Apr 09, 2011 8:41 pm

DutchRailnut wrote:The Communicating signals are pretty much universal in Railroad industry, codes are same for GCOR, NORAC, MNCR , etc
And the MNR rulebook is on that site too. Full list of stuff:

http://amtrakengineer.startlogic.com/th ... /id95.html

AMT-2, AMT-3, AMT-5, GCOR, MNCR, NORAC, CSXT, NS

Terminal Proceed
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Location: New York

Re: Door buzzer codes

Post by Terminal Proceed » Sun Apr 10, 2011 12:16 am

why do you need to knwo this is what i'm confused about. If you want to know so bad become a conductor or engineer.

Travelsonic
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Re: Door buzzer codes

Post by Travelsonic » Sun Apr 10, 2011 12:10 pm

Terminal Proceed wrote:why do you need to knwo this is what i'm confused about.
I'm guessing curiosity - I too was curious about this specific topic.

gmbfly98
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Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2011 4:19 pm

Re: Door buzzer codes

Post by gmbfly98 » Sun Apr 10, 2011 4:36 pm

Travelsonic wrote:
Terminal Proceed wrote:why do you need to knwo this is what i'm confused about.
I'm guessing curiosity - I too was curious about this specific topic.
Yep, mostly curiosity, but partly also to enhance my train simming ;-)

Trainer
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Location: Western CT

Re: Door buzzer codes

Post by Trainer » Mon Apr 11, 2011 8:36 am

While all of the above is true, MNCR has added a few codes of their own:

One long buzz followed by a short buzz means "We're slipping on leaves and we just slid past the station"
Two long buzzes means "Bring the engineer some black coffee"
Two long buzzes followed by 2 short buzzes means "Coffee with 2 sugars"
Two long buzzes followed by 2 short buzzes and a long buzz means "And cream"
Three long buzzes followed by a short buzz means "We've got a deadbeat fare beater. Stop the train over a bridge so we can toss him off"
Four long buzzes means "Let's all wave to the inspection train"
One short buzz followed by a long buzz means "So, what do you think about them Yankees?"
One short buzz followed by 2 long buzzes means "They should win tonight"
One short buzz followed by 3 long buzzes means "Don't bet on them"

On a more serious note, the first three NORAC codes were also used by my fire department. Many fire trucks are equipped with signal systems that run between the cab and the crew riding on the back. There's a single button that lights up when pushed either place and the driver can advise the crew and vice-versa using the light signals.

RearOfSignal
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Re: Door buzzer codes

Post by RearOfSignal » Mon Apr 11, 2011 2:40 pm

Amtrak7 wrote:
DutchRailnut wrote:The Communicating signals are pretty much universal in Railroad industry, codes are same for GCOR, NORAC, MNCR , etc
And the MNR rulebook is on that site too. Full list of stuff:

http://amtrakengineer.startlogic.com/th ... /id95.html

AMT-2, AMT-3, AMT-5, GCOR, MNCR, NORAC, CSXT, NS
That's the old rulebook, the new rulebook when into effect 2/27/11.

As a side note, the train crews don't need any assistance on the buzzers from passengers or wannabe conductors and engineers. So please don't push buzzers as this will interfere with train operations and cause confusion to train crew.
Hurry up and wait at the signal!

Jayjay1213
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Re: Door buzzer codes

Post by Jayjay1213 » Mon Apr 11, 2011 4:21 pm

Not a fan of" buzzer boy"?

RearOfSignal
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Re: Door buzzer codes

Post by RearOfSignal » Mon Apr 11, 2011 6:15 pm

Jayjay1213 wrote:Not a fan of" buzzer boy"?
Don't think anyone is fan of his, especially not on the railroad. :)
Hurry up and wait at the signal!

gmbfly98
Posts: 52
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2011 4:19 pm

Re: Door buzzer codes

Post by gmbfly98 » Mon Apr 11, 2011 6:36 pm

RearOfSignal wrote: As a side note, the train crews don't need any assistance on the buzzers from passengers or wannabe conductors and engineers. So please don't push buzzers as this will interfere with train operations and cause confusion to train crew.
I would assume doing so would count as "interfering with a crew member" or some such rule (I know such a rule exists for aviation, and I'm just assuming one exists for railroads too) anyway.

In any case, since I'm new to posting here (though I've been a reader for quite some time), I suppose you can say I'm fascinated by the procedures all crewed forms of transportation employ, and have respect for what goes in to it all. While I try to learn as much as I can about the procedures to satisfy my own curiosity, I would never assume that such knowledge would give me the right to act in place of an actual, trained crewman (or crew woman).

DutchRailnut
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Re: Door buzzer codes

Post by DutchRailnut » Mon Apr 11, 2011 8:08 pm

Rule would be"interference with interstate commerce" a federal crime.
If Conductors are in charge, why are they promoted to be Engineer???

Retired Triebfahrzeugführer. I am not a moderator.

Ridgefielder
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Re: Door buzzer codes

Post by Ridgefielder » Tue Apr 12, 2011 11:46 am

Amtrak7 wrote:The door buzzer is officially called the "communicating signal appliance".

From NORAC (not MNR rules):

One long buzz means to stop, or to apply/release brakes when stopped.
Two short buzzes means to start.
Three short buzzes means to back up, or when already moving forward, stop at next station.
Four short buzzes means brake test complete
One short buzz means to prepare to stop

http://www.amtrakengineer.net/NORAC90408.pdf; PDF pages 29–30
Aren't some of these-- particularly two short to start-- the same as the whistle signals used in pre-radio days?

Trainer
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Location: Western CT

Re: Door buzzer codes

Post by Trainer » Tue Apr 12, 2011 2:36 pm

I imagine that the origin of these signals came from maritime regulations. Three short ship's horn blasts means 'I am operating astern', so they at least have that one still in common.

However, one short blast on a boat means "Changing course to starboard", and that's not something that trains normally do, at least on purpose.

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