Discussion relating to the operations of MTA MetroNorth Railroad including west of Hudson operations and discussion of CtDOT sponsored rail operations such as Shore Line East and the Springfield to New Haven Hartford Line

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, nomis, FL9AC, Jeff Smith

  by brnxvill
 
I seem to remember that the ACMU's, when they were in dark green paint in the early 60's, had wicker seats and when train arrivd at GCT the conductor would walk through the train from the rear car and push the seatbacks forward ( they were ingeniously hinged) so that whenever the train was moving the seats would always be facing forward. Am I crazy or does anyone else remember this? Those were the recently retired ACMU's right, similar to the ones sitting at the siding at MVW.

  by mncommuter
 
I can't vouch for the wicker, but they still have the hinged seats
  by Tom Curtin
 
As I recall there were two orders of these cars: the 1962 order did indeed have wicker seats with the "ingenious hinge" you describe. The 1965 order had blue-upholstered seats of the standard "walkover" variety.

  by R384149
 
i beleive the 1965 cars retained their original seats till the end but the 1962 cars had diiferent seats which flipped over the top, i think these were put in after their rebuild in the early 80s.

  by DutchRailnut
 
The MNCR 1100's always had blue cushioned flip seats, even the unrebuild ones.
only the earlier series with single headlight had the wicker flip seats.

  by brnxvill
 
Thanks Dutch! Two final thoughts: 1. Those seats were comfortably cool to sit on and..2. They wouldn't have made it a week in todays times where everything gets defaced and destroyed pretty much as soon as it arrives.
  by Tom Curtin
 
Folks, the 1950-built cars with the single headlight (and larger windows) had regular "walkover" wicker seats.

The 1962-built cars were built with the "flip-over" (my term) wicker seats as original equipment.

The 1965-built cars had blue-upholstered standard walkover seats as original equipment.

I remember all 3 series of cars well when riding The Harlem as a college student in the 60s. The 3 types were arbitrarily intermixed.