• Why does MD have high platforms and VA have low platforms?

  • Discussion related to DC area passenger rail services from Northern Virginia to Baltimore, MD. Includes Light Rail and Baltimore Subway.
Discussion related to DC area passenger rail services from Northern Virginia to Baltimore, MD. Includes Light Rail and Baltimore Subway.

Moderators: mtuandrew, therock, Robert Paniagua

  by Amtrak7
 
realtype wrote:
keyboardkat wrote:Also, as far as most commuter lines outside the NEC not using low platforms, the LIRR years ago converted all its stations to high platforms to conform to the car floor height and subway-type sliding doors on the M-1 and M-3 MU cars, and now the C-3 bilevel locomotive hauled cars.
All commuter rail systems in the Northeast at large use high platforms, but I think all of them except Metro-North, LIRR, and maybe SLE also use low platforms for a large number of their stations.
LIRR has no revenue cars that can board from a LL platform.
MN has no revenue electric cars that can board from LL platforms, so they are only in diesel territory. Even then, there are only 6 full-time stations (and 3 part-time stations) with LL platforms.
SLE has one LL platform station (Westbrook).
  by realtype
 
Amtrak7 wrote:
realtype wrote:
keyboardkat wrote:Also, as far as most commuter lines outside the NEC not using low platforms, the LIRR years ago converted all its stations to high platforms to conform to the car floor height and subway-type sliding doors on the M-1 and M-3 MU cars, and now the C-3 bilevel locomotive hauled cars.
All commuter rail systems in the Northeast at large use high platforms, but I think all of them except Metro-North, LIRR, and maybe SLE also use low platforms for a large number of their stations.
LIRR has no revenue cars that can board from a LL platform.
MN has no revenue electric cars that can board from LL platforms, so they are only in diesel territory. Even then, there are only 6 full-time stations (and 3 part-time stations) with LL platforms.
SLE has one LL platform station (Westbrook).
Yeah, I forgot about Metro-North's West-of-Hudson lines. I didn't even know there was a low platform on the SLE.
  by dt_rt40
 
What makes more sense for US rail? Installing gantlet tracks at every station to allow for high platform... or legislate that freight trains must be more narrow?

Both seem to be pretty tough sells. Greenbelt on the Camden Line has a pretty long high platform that uses 2 pocket tracks in addition to the two mains (4 tracks through station), but it wouldn't make sense to do that for every station either.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Green ... tation.JPG
Has there ever been a case of a freight train accidentally being routed on to a high level platform track? It would depend on the consist, but I think "not a pretty picture" would be the most apt description. Of course the cheap wood ones like the temporary one at Wilmington would be ripped to shreds.
  by realtype
 
dt_rt40 wrote:
What makes more sense for US rail? Installing gantlet tracks at every station to allow for high platform... or legislate that freight trains must be more narrow?

Both seem to be pretty tough sells. Greenbelt on the Camden Line has a pretty long high platform that uses 2 pocket tracks in addition to the two mains (4 tracks through station), but it wouldn't make sense to do that for every station either.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Green ... tation.JPG
Has there ever been a case of a freight train accidentally being routed on to a high level platform track? It would depend on the consist, but I think "not a pretty picture" would be the most apt description. Of course the cheap wood ones like the temporary one at Wilmington would be ripped to shreds.
Yeah, I've wondered the same thing. Apparently, it would only be specfic trains that would cause damage though. I'm not sure, but I think that there are many types of freight equipment that have clearance past a high platform. I think for the most part there are no high platforms where freight operates, with Greenbelt and New Carrollton being the exception. One of the Frederick stations (Monocacy) also has a high platform (for a single track although two run through the station), but the track is owned by the MTA and no freight runs on it. Unlike the platform at New C., Greenbelt's platform doesn't have an overhang but the edge is fully supported, so the train might take more damage than the platform and might even derail, although those freights have a lot of momentum. Regardless, as you said it wouldn't be a pretty picture :-D .