• What's important for the disabled and variously impaired

  • General discussion of passenger rail proposals and systems not otherwise covered in the specific forums in this category, including high speed rail.
General discussion of passenger rail proposals and systems not otherwise covered in the specific forums in this category, including high speed rail.

Moderators: mtuandrew, gprimr1

  by Myrtone
 
Again, let's talk 100% low floor and look at European light rail. The Porto Eurotram has lots of tip-up seats and so can most certainly accommodate lots of wheelchairs.
Image

Apparently, it's the same with the Strasbourg Eurotram.
Image
However, the posts in the aisle seem to be a major obstacle for those personal wheeled things.
  by Myrtone
 
Regarding destination blinds, these should also be in a font where the letters of the ISO basic (Latin) alphabet are as different from each other and each Western Arabic numeral as possible. For example:

*b, d, and p should not differ just by orientation, note that this can confuse dyslexic people.
*Capital I should have the horizontal lines top and bottom.
*z should not look like the symbol for three, whether routes are numbered or not.
  by electricron
 
Myrtone wrote: Sun Apr 01, 2018 12:09 pm Again, let's talk 100% low floor and look at European light rail. The Porto Eurotram has lots of tip-up seats and so can most certainly accommodate lots of wheelchairs.
Apparently, it's the same with the Strasbourg Eurotram.
However, the posts in the aisle seem to be a major obstacle for those personal wheeled things.
Huh? :(
Not every door on a tram anywhere in the world has signage for wheelchair access.
Flip up seats are often located near wheelchair tie downs, not only to make room for the wheelchairs but also allow extra seating when the wheelchair tie down is not being used.
The other doors on a tram usually have posts so standing passengers during peak travel times can hold onto to something to keep from being jostled around and possibly falling to the floor.
Believe it or not, almost all standing passengers like to crowd in the vestibules by the doors.

The photos linked earlier are not very evident which door it represents, a wheelchair space or not. But even if the pole is near a wheelchair space, it is located exactly in the middle of the train, assuming more than 8 feet in width and therefore at least 4 feet from the walls. All most wheelchairs need is around a 3 feet diameter turning circle, well within the 4 feet that should be available.
So I ask again, huh? :(
  by Myrtone
 
electricron wrote: Fri Nov 05, 2021 6:44 pm Not every door on a tram anywhere in the world has signage for wheelchair access.
But every entrance on nearly all new ones is step-free and at platform stops, there is level boarding though all doors.
  by electricron
 
Myrtone wrote: Wed Mar 23, 2022 12:57 am
electricron wrote: Fri Nov 05, 2021 6:44 pm Not every door on a tram anywhere in the world has signage for wheelchair access.
But every entrance on nearly all new ones is step-free and at platform stops, there is level boarding though all doors.
Well, you are correct hat there is level boarding on nearly all the new lines and vehicles, there is not necessarily straps or tie downs to secure the wheelchairs in place. And some door access areas are reserved for bicycles instead of wheelchairs. So I will repeat, not every door is for wheelchairs.!!!!!