The passing of J. J. Young

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Phil Hom

The passing of J. J. Young

Post by Phil Hom »

While not a railroad industry "mover and shaker", a fellow railfan passed on. Here is a post by Art House on another group

"I have today received word of the death of John "J.J." Young, Jr., who passed away earlier today (11/27/04) at his home in Charleston, W.V. He was 76.

John was a prolific and talented railroad photographer, and was widely published in the railfan press from the 1940s on. His photos appeared in many magazines and books covering the steam to diesel transition era, and after. His early work included extensive coverage of the B&O, C&O, W&LE, Pennsy, and other lines.

John was a native of West Virginia, but lived many years in Binghamton, N.Y., where he extensively photographed the Erie, Lackawanna, E-L, Lehigh Valley, and Delaware and Hudson. After retiring from a career in photography and audio-visual work, he returned to West Virginia to live in the 1990s.

John was a great guy, wonderful storyteller, and a tireless and enthusiastic railfan who was always willing to share photo tips and techniques with younger fans and newcomers to the hobby. He was once among the most widely published railfan photographers in the nation. He will be sorely missed.

Art House "

Phil Hom

Post by Phil Hom »


mxdata
Posts: 1648
Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2004 4:30 pm

Post by mxdata »

I was saddened to hear of the passing of this fine gentleman and good friend. We are fortunate however that John shared with us a vast array of his outstanding photography and superb writings which are a truly memorable legacy.

ANDY117
Posts: 1944
Joined: Tue Aug 17, 2004 10:01 pm
Location: Forgotten in a siding

Post by ANDY117 »

I wish I met this guy. Where can I find his photos?

henry6

EVERYWHERE

Post by henry6 »

Everwhere you look in magazines and books from the mid 60s to the late 90s. Especially TRAINS, RAILPACE, and RAILROAD AND RAILFAN magazines. S.V Chapt, NRHS in Vestal has a generous collection. Look in railroad books published at the same times including those by Beebe, W.S. Young, and Kalmbach Publications.

mxdata
Posts: 1648
Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2004 4:30 pm

Post by mxdata »

I wonder if any of the railroad historical societies down in J.J.'s area ever bothered to record a spoken history interview with him. More and more people like J.J. who were central figures in this hobby during the age of railfan newsletters and information magazines are passing away now. There has been some effort to record these kind of interviews with former railroad employees, but from what I can see very few of the prominent railfan photographers and historians are afforded this kind of attention yet. Recording interviews is an activity that really needs to be organized and promoted through some of the historical societies or the museums with established archive programs.
"We Repair No Locomotive Before Its Time"

henry6

I DON'T THINK

Post by henry6 »

I don't think so, at least here in Binghamton. We did have a Farewell Roast and he did leave the SVRHS Chapter-NRHS a lot of material (photos). But, as for a spoken remberence, (and I say this affectionatley) only the resonance of his voice above the crowd and the train noise reverberates in my head!

mxdata
Posts: 1648
Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2004 4:30 pm

Post by mxdata »

Yes, J.J. had a very distinctive and loud voice, and that is one reason a tape of him would have been even more memorable.

We had a similar discussion about John Kirkland on another string some time ago and came to about the same conclusion. John had participated in some seminars and discussions before railroad enthusiast audiences and apparently none of those sessions were documented on tape either.

All too often "historical societies" get hung up on the railroad and equipment trivia, and overlook the fact that history is made by people. The people pass away and then it is too late to interview them. Opportunities lost, over and over again.
"We Repair No Locomotive Before Its Time"

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