Nothing Like It In The World-Stephen E. Ambrose

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Aa3rt
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Nothing Like It In The World-Stephen E. Ambrose

Post by Aa3rt » Sun Nov 07, 2004 9:18 pm

I was wondering if any of you folks who frequent this forum had read this book. (Full title: Nothing Like It In The World: The Men Who Built The Transcontinental Railroad 1863-1869) Is it historically accurate? Is it worth the time to read? Any input?
Art Audley, AA3RT
Moderator: Railroad Radio & Communications, Railroads in Books, Magazines, Music, TV and other Media, General Discussion: Fallen Trolley & Interurban Lines, General Discussion: Shortline, Industrial & Military Railroads,

LCJ

Post by LCJ » Sun Nov 07, 2004 9:26 pm

Excellent book. I believe it's very accurate. I recommend it.

joshuahouse
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Post by joshuahouse » Thu Nov 11, 2004 5:24 pm

All of Ambrose's stuff is acurate, however, I seem to recall that it came out that he had plagerized much of this book from someone else.
Check out my photography from around the Finger Lakes. [url] http://joshua-house.artistwebsites.com/ ... +state/all[url/]

LCJ

Post by LCJ » Thu Nov 11, 2004 5:30 pm

Here's the real story:

http://slate.msn.com/?id=2060618

Aa3rt
Posts: 869
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 2004 8:09 pm
Location: La Plata, MD, MP 38.8 on the Pope's Creek sub

Post by Aa3rt » Fri Nov 12, 2004 2:11 pm

Gentlemen-thanks for the replies. I did a "Google" search on the book and read about the accused plagarism and inaccuracies. I was thinking about the book as a Christmas gift-now I'm debating. I have a couple of Ambrose's WWII books but did not realized that he'd ventured into other areas of American history.
Art Audley, AA3RT
Moderator: Railroad Radio & Communications, Railroads in Books, Magazines, Music, TV and other Media, General Discussion: Fallen Trolley & Interurban Lines, General Discussion: Shortline, Industrial & Military Railroads,

Gilbert B Norman
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Post by Gilbert B Norman » Sat Nov 13, 2004 7:49 am

As I recall, the book does little justice to the intended contribution of Jim Beckwourth. Theodore Judah, the only one of the "gang', mainly comprised of the "big four" - Leland Stanford, Collis Huntington, Mark Hopkins and Charles Crocker, to whom the phrase "honest" could remotely apply to, was willing to listen to Beckwourth, who had knowledge of the more favorable pass over the Sierras - the Western Pacific route of today. The others simply could not be concerned as Beckwourth was a Native American; "what does HE know?".

A book I once purchased at the Museum in Sacramento gives more "balanced' coverage of Jim Beckwourth's contributions than did Mr. Ambrose. There may also be some material available elsewhere on the web.

Just a personal thought.

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