• The New York Ave station celebrates its 5th birthday

  • Discussion related to DC area passenger rail services from Northern Virginia to Baltimore, MD. Includes Light Rail and Baltimore Subway.
Discussion related to DC area passenger rail services from Northern Virginia to Baltimore, MD. Includes Light Rail and Baltimore Subway.

Moderators: mtuandrew, therock, Robert Paniagua

  by tommyboy6181
 
It really doesn't seem like it was that long ago, but the New York Ave. station has reached a milestone. The first of the new look stations and the first "in fill" station in the system opened 5 years ago today.

Metro ended up looking back and did this news release on some of the developments that have occurred since the station's opening on 11/20/2004.
Link: http://www.wmata.com/about_metro/news/P ... aseID=4147

Metro's New York Ave-Florida Ave-Gallaudet U Metrorail station celebrates five years of service
Ridership growth, station a catalyst for economic development

Five years ago today, Metro, the District of Columbia and the New York Avenue partners opened the New York Ave-Florida Ave-Gallaudet U Metrorail station on the Red Line. Since its opening, ridership has climbed at the station each year and the station has become a catalyst for economic development.

At the time of its opening, the New York Ave-Florida Ave-Gallaudet U Metrorail station was heralded as a unique public-private partnership that would expand economic development and prosperity to the NoMa and Capitol Hill North portion of Northeast Washington.

With the station’s opening, economic development has grown as local and federal agencies, the hospitality industry and small businesses have opened their doors within a short distance of the New York Ave-Florida Ave-Gallaudet U Metrorail station. In the last five years, five million square feet of new office, hotel, housing and retail has been constructed around the New York Avenue Metrorail station. Current and future NoMa tenants include the U.S. Department of Alcohol, Tobacco and Fire Arms, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the General Services Administration, the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services, the District of Columbia Government, NPR and Sirius XM Radio. A Courtyard by Marriott hotel opened its doors just steps from the train station, and a Hilton Garden Inn opens in 2011. More than 750 residential units will open in 2010.

As economic development has flourished in the New York Avenue area, ridership at the neighborhood’s Metrorail station has also increased. In its first year, the average monthly ridership at the station was 55,863 riders. Now as the station celebrates its fifth anniversary, the average monthly ridership at the station through Oct. 2009 is 121,298 riders.

New York Ave-Florida Ave-Gallaudet U Metrorail Ridership Trends
Dates Ridership Per Month

Nov. 2004 to Oct. 2005 55,863
Nov. 2005 to Oct. 2006 71,970
Nov. 2006 to Oct. 2007 85,701
Nov. 2007 to Oct. 2008 104,404
Nov. 2008 to Oct. 2009 121,298

The opening of the station has resulted in $1.5 billion of private development within walking distance of the station, with a total of 20 million square feet planned, according to Liz Price, president of the NoMa Business Improvement District. “The New York Avenue Metrorail Station was really the catalyst for the revitalization underway,” Price said. “In the last five years, we have seen this neighborhood transform into a mixed-use, transit-oriented area, and we are looking forward to the opening of nearly 800 residential units and the Harris Teeter grocery store by fall 2010. The changes are just beginning.”

The cost of the New York Ave-Florida Ave-Gallaudet U Metrorail station was $109.9 million, made possible through a public-private partnership where private landowners created a special taxing district of the land around the station. Landowners agreed to be assessed a “Metro Benefit Assessment Fee” based on the value of their property that generated a $25 million private sector contribution to station development. The District of Columbia contributed $59.9 million and the federal government provided $25 million for the project.

The New York Ave-Florida Ave-Gallaudet U Metrorail station was Metro’s first station to be built between two operating stations while concurrently maintaining passenger service. The station included many firsts, such as the use of the design/build project delivery that reduced the project schedule to half the typical delivery time, the integration of the Arts-In-Transit public art program into a station design, and the construction of a bicycle trail as part of the station to improve bicycle and pedestrian links. The station also incorporated several revisions to the standard designs of Metro’s older stations including civil/architectural enhancements as well as systems improvements. Metro worked closely with stakeholders to better integrate the station into the neighborhood and the adjacent development sites.

“The New York Avenue Metrorail station is a dramatic example of the potential of public-private partnerships and is a model for successful transit oriented economic development that strives to meet the needs and expectations of 21st century transit supporters, advocates and patrons,” said Nat Bottigheimer, Metro’s Assistant General Manager for Planning and Joint Development.

Media contact for this news release: Steven Taubenkibel or Lisa Farbstein at 202-962-1051. Rachel Davis NoMa Business Improvement District at 202-289-0111
For all other inquiries, please call customer service at 202-637-7000.


News release issued at 8:51 am, November 20, 2009.


Now if only the new above ground stations on the Dulles extension would look like this and the Largo extension...
  by Sand Box John
 
"tommyboy6181"
Now if only the new above ground stations on the Dulles extension would look like this and the Largo extension...


Original plans call for using the same general architectural style that WMATA used in their new look, second generation designed station. Dulles Transit Partners has gone a bit further with the design to make it their own. Mind you the rendering below may not be exact representations of what will actually gets built, they are likely pretty close.

Tyson East (WestGate)

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Looking west from southeast corner of Dolley Madison Boulevard and Colshire Drive.

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Looking east from west end of platform, outbound track on left.


Tysons Central 123 (Tysons Center)

Image
Looking west from southeast corner of Dolley Madison Boulevard and Tyson Boulevard.

Image
Looking north from south side of Dolley Madison Boulevard west of Tyson Boulevard.

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Looking east from south side of Dolley Madison Boulevard east of International Drive


Tyson Central 7 (Pike Seven Plaza)

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Looking north paid area Mezzanine.

Image
Looking south from west side of Leesburg Pike.


Tysons West (Spring Hill Road)

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Looking east from northwest corner of Leesburg Pike and Spring Hill Road.

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Looking west from southeast corner of Leesburg Pike and Spring Hill Road.
Last edited by Sand Box John on Sun Nov 22, 2009 8:36 am, edited 1 time in total.
  by tommyboy6181
 
The pictures for Tysons East actually look like a modernized version of King St and Braddock Rd with the single slope roof. That's actually a pretty nice look. I'm still not crazy for Tysons Central 123 with that arch roof, but that's just my opinion.
  by Sand Box John
 
"tommyboy6181"
The pictures for Tysons East actually look like a modernized version of King St and Braddock Rd with the single slope roof.


Never really looked at it that way, probably because of all of the brick used in those two Alexandria station.

That's actually a pretty nice look.

Of the four stations in Tysons Corner, The Tysons East (WestGate) station has the least amount of embellishment applied to it.

I'm still not crazy for Tysons Central 123 with that arch roof, but that's just my opinion.

I am not sure that the station will end up having that arched roof. There are various documents and other graphic file at dullesmetro.com that conflict with the design depicted in the above renderings.

The Pike 7 (Pike Seven Plaza), station in the ditch will have that arched roof over the mezzanine above platform. I am not that big of a fan of the station in the ditch. If I had it my way, that station would have been an elevated station built closer to the Westpark Drive/Gosnell Road intersection.
  by geoking66
 
I think that's the first time I've ever seen SketchUp used in a professional rendering. Onto the architecture, it's OK (mainly Tysons East). I'd rather them go back to the original above ground architecture (like that at New Carrollton). It still looks the best of all the other above-ground designs.
  by JackRussell
 
geoking66 wrote:I think that's the first time I've ever seen SketchUp used in a professional rendering. Onto the architecture, it's OK (mainly Tysons East). I'd rather them go back to the original above ground architecture (like that at New Carrollton). It still looks the best of all the other above-ground designs.
It amuses me that they put so few cars in their drawings.
  by Sand Box John
 
"geoking66"
I think that's the first time I've ever seen SketchUp used in a professional rendering.


Having not yet messed SketchUp, I would have never known. One of these days I will take one the spare boxes I have and set it up as a SketchUp work station.

Onto the architecture, it's OK (mainly Tysons East). I'd rather them go back to the original above ground architecture (like that at New Carrollton). It still looks the best of all the other above-ground designs.

At first I was not to fond of WMATA's second generation surface station designs. I have sense grown to appreciate it's simplicity. The thing I like least about it, is the use of painted steel.

Like you, I find the classic concrete gull wing canopy to be a superior architectural form. The other thing I like about the first generation station design is the use the of the tongue and groove texture on all vertical concrete surfaces. A variation was used on the Largo extension, however the texture is nowhere to be found in the New York Avenue station.

The only thing I would do different is use a light colored igneous rock for aggregate and a light colored sand in the concrete mix instead of sedimentary sand and high iron content gravel that was used in most of the exiting stations.
  by Robert Paniagua
 
Let's steer Tyson's Corner extension discussion to the Dulles corridor line Thread. Thanks everyone

This one is for Florida Ave Station on The Red
  by Sand Box John
 
"Robert Paniagua"
Let's steer Tyson's Corner extension discussion to the Dulles corridor line Thread. Thanks everyone

This one is for Florida Ave Station on The Red


Don’t mean to pick nits here Robert, The discussion has gone in the direction of comparing the various architectural differences between the old (original 103 mile ARS), the new (New York Avenue) and the future (N Route Silver line).
  by Robert Paniagua
 
That's fine then, I'll aloow that John :-), I didn't know that you were comparing architectures, mainly since they will be identical to the East End K route Blue Line and the Branch Ave Green Line
  by Sand Box John
 
"Robert Paniagua"
That's fine then, I'll aloow that John :-), I didn't know that you were comparing architectures, mainly since they will be identical to the East End G route Blue Line and the Branch Ave Green Line


There will be very little that is architectural similar to what will be built on the N route Silver Line compared to WMATA's second generation design that was used at New York Avenue and on the G route Blue line extension.

Mezzanine roofs and platform canopies will be different. treatment of vertical concrete surfaces will be different. The quarry tile that has been used sense day one in passageway, on mezzanine and platform has been jettisoned for concrete.

I only posted a small sample of the rendering of the N route Silver Line stations. One can see all of them at dullesmetro.com/stations by clicking on the view the online slideshow in the station descriptions.