Discussion relating to the operations of MTA MetroNorth Railroad including west of Hudson operations and discussion of CtDOT sponsored rail operations such as Shore Line East and the Springfield to New Haven Hartford Line

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, nomis, FL9AC, Jeff Smith

  by Head-end View
 
You're right Tom. I've never seen an M-7 running with the cab window uncovered. But I'll keep looking; maybe there's still hope after all....... :-D

  by njtmnrrbuff
 
N34,
The transit Arrows have those plates. I remember 7 yearz ago riding on one on the Gladstone, I took pictures out the front but the conductor gave me an awkward look and put the plate up.
  by N340SG
 
Dutch or other MN personnel,

Would it be correct to assume that MetrNorth's M-7a cars have the same movable plate on the cab door window as the LIRR M-7 has?

Tom

  by DutchRailnut
 
No we don't have the plate, just darkend glass. and a sticker that says DO not Block this door.

  by M1 9147
 
On LIRR's C3 Bilevel cabs, there is the plate also, and you would be very lucky if the plate is down like the M7's. I lucked out on Thursday as cab 5001 had its plate down. I know this is not relevant to MN, but in the subject of the railfan window plate.
  by Terrapin Station
 
Head-end View wrote:Terrapin: M-N must have the cab-door window uncovered then. I didn't know this. 'Cause on LIRR there is some kind of plate or curtain over that M-7 window, always. Absolutely no seeing thru on LIRR M-7's. Hmmm, maybe I'll take a ride on Metro-North sometime this summer.
Interesting............Thanks! :-)
Yeah, I should have said M7a. I never tried to look out the cab door window of a LIRR M7, and I guess I won't ever bother trying. Long live the LIRR M-3's! And thank you MNR for not installing the window blocker plates on your M7a's!

  by Silverliner II
 
If I may butt in with an unrelated question: On the LIRR, the designations are M1, M3, and M7. On Metro-North, they are M1a, M3a, and M7a.

Why the "a" suffix? Aside from the third rail shoe setup, and cab signal differences, aren't the cars otherwise mechanically and cosmetically identical? Or is there more to it?

  by Penn Central
 
Silverliner II wrote:If I may butt in with an unrelated question: On the LIRR, the designations are M1, M3, and M7. On Metro-North, they are M1a, M3a, and M7a.

Why the "a" suffix? Aside from the third rail shoe setup, and cab signal differences, aren't the cars otherwise mechanically and cosmetically identical? Or is there more to it?
While the cars appear identical and have similar components, there are many differences between the MNR and LIRR cars. On the M7, Metro-North has several hundred changes including seat configuration, cab signal, secondary automatic brake system (for towing), software changes, penalty brake limits, etc. etc. Despite the changes, an LIRR M series car can run on MN with modified third rail shoes and the cab signal cutout (LIRR's six aspect cab signal can work on MN's four aspect system, but not vice-versa).

  by AmtrakFan
 
I believe this has to do with liability but can they move it in case of an emergancy escape?

  by Silverliner II
 
Penn Central wrote:While the cars appear identical and have similar components, there are many differences between the MNR and LIRR cars. On the M7, Metro-North has several hundred changes including seat configuration, cab signal, secondary automatic brake system (for towing), software changes, penalty brake limits, etc. etc. Despite the changes, an LIRR M series car can run on MN with modified third rail shoes and the cab signal cutout (LIRR's six aspect cab signal can work on MN's four aspect system, but not vice-versa).
Thanks!

Different seat configurations too, eh? I need to take a spin on the M7's of both railroads soon!

  by DutchRailnut
 
LIRR M7's have seats face away from vestibules
MNCR M7a's have seats facing towards vestibules

  by Silverliner II
 
Although even the viewable railfan windows are an endangered species on SEPTA and NJ Transit.

I've noticed that on most off-peak trains, the lead MU (or cab car if the train is in push mode) is closed to passengers on a regular basis anyway. On SEPTA, there are exceptions on heavier off-peak trips.

  by Robert Paniagua
 
During my last visit on MNRR (July 6, 05) I got to go to the lead car (which was open) and got to see thru the front along with some small young children whose parents took them to the front window to see thru the front. And everybody really liked it, and there were no restrictions or blockages on the railfan window on that train which was the New Haven-Grand Central run, so I got lucky there.

  by the missing link
 
iv'e almost never had a prob looking out the front,every time i go in i go to the front.not so often going out,sometimes they're deadheads.i don't recall having ever been rocked on the main line.on the long island i can understand though.for some reason there were hot spots that stayed that way for years.i wont name towns.but thank god for f.r.a.glass.once i took the budd cars out to port jervis because they were going out soon,i think early 90,i asked the conductor at suffern if it was o.k. to take pictures through the front.he said no prob,but not in the vestibule,which of course,is the rule,yes.he stood in my view for the entire trip

  by Clean Cab
 
The seats opposite the cab are for when the train is running in the other direction. Originally those seats were used only by conductors. It wasn't until the mid 1980s that passengers were allowed to use them. I can tell you from personal experience that I hate it when people stand outside the cab when I'm operating the train. If I ever had to run out of the cab, they'd be in the way. Keep in mind that the engineer is the only person on the train that sits behind a window that can break. All other windows are Lexan and can withstand almost anything.