Discussion relating to the operations of MTA MetroNorth Railroad including west of Hudson operations and discussion of CtDOT sponsored rail operations such as Shore Line East and the Springfield to New Haven Hartford Line

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, nomis, FL9AC, Jeff Smith

  by oakpoint
 
Back in the days on the New Canaan "Dink" run when there was the meet at Springdale Cemetary, then there was the collision which resulted in the fatality in the two seater next to the engineer's cab.

Like wise on buses you are not permitted forward of the yellow line. for safety reasons.

Charles D :(

  by bellstbarn
 
I guess that I should count myself lucky to have done a lot of front-window watching along the various LIRR and MN north routes, even out the front of Arrows to Trenton. Through the 1970's and 1980's there was a lot more visibility than earlier. For example, as a resident of Marble Hill in the 1940's, I recall that all NY Central mu's had full-width cabs, that is, the front vestibule, with (if my memory is correct) a windowless door blocking the view. Even the first post-war mu's came, I believe, with a shade that the engineer would always yank down. I can certainly understand why an engineer would want immediate access to the left side of his "cab," in case there was something there that needed a look. Another time, however, as an adult riding the head car from Trenton to Philadelphia, I was puzzled why we stopped under an overpass. I stood up to observe the offending signal and found that the engineer needed to pee out the side door! Quick, back to my seat.
  by Noel Weaver
 
I ran the 4400 class MU's on the former NHRR many times, also the 1100's
on Conrail and Metro North. These cars as well as Budd RDC cars had
shades on the door leading to the cab.
On the MU's, the shade was on the cab side of the door but on the RDC's,
it was on the interior side of the door.
I always made sure that the shade was down at all times on the MU's and
at night on the RDC's due to a huge glare from the interior lights that
generally interfered with my vision out of the front window. If the shade
was not working, torn or broken I would tape a piece of cardboard over
the glass, it accomplished the same thing. It wasn't to keep people from
looking out, simply to insure that I could see everything that I had to see
at all times.
Noel Weaver

  by Robert Paniagua
 
If the shade
was not working, torn or broken I would tape a piece of cardboard over
the glass, it accomplished the same thing. It wasn't to keep people from
looking out, simply to insure that I could see everything that I had to see
at all times.


Or you could have taken one of the "ad-posters" and placed it in the windows, just like the MBTA #3 Red Line Car 01800-series, which T Red Line Personnel block the lower portion of the "inspector's side" seat window to prevent sunglare, and not to discourage passengers from seeing thru. Now more than ever, more 01800 cars have had the window covered lately. However, on the 01400s, 015/1600s, 01200s and 01700s, their windows have black curtains for that same purpose, except on the left side of them, it's already blocked in by the Cab Signal Box.

  by Tadman
 
I'm very envious of you northeasterners to have so many MU's - we only have two lines plus the L here in Chicago, and the rf seats and views are disappearing fast - first in the early 90's South Shore banned cab rides and vestibule riding, the Metra never had a left side window, and now with the new MU's on Metra, the gallery cars offer no view thru windows other than the door. On CTA, the cabs just grew to full-width since 2000, so one has to sit with back to cab and twist to view thru both windows. I'm looking forward to a long weekend where I can ride MU's all over NYC and Philly some day.

  by Penn Central
 
Otto Vondrak wrote:The railroad can do whatever it wants, but if they didnt want people near the front or the door controls, why is there a seat there?
The seat on the opposite side of the aisle is not the problem. Customers standing in front of the cab door and blocking emergency egress was the issue. When children stand next to the door, you can't see them. I knocked over a young child once when opening a cab door on an M1. Luckily, the parent was able to catch the youngster before they fell down. The door has a crash bar that allows the engineer to get out quickly. There are several scenarios that can require that. Rock throwers, falling trees, autos on grade crossings, etc. If someone is about to smash your window with a rock, there is no time to say, "excuse me, but would you be kind enough to move so I can save myself from personal injury? thank you very much."

  by MACTRAXX
 
Guys: on the LIRR I notice more often than not that when the engineer is operating with the door open,no one that is not an employe will stray up forward to look-including me. I will look if the door is closed. Tom-those holders or spurs were installed in the early 80s as a partial solution for the problem of a hot car-just the two openable windows on each car-one in the cab meaning just one outside.The LIRR after the 1980 summer AC meltdown installed them for the "yellow ropes"that all the crews got so they can be used to tie the end doors open. I have seen engineers also use the top of the first opposite 3-seat to the engineers cab use a chain or bungee cord tied to the door area of the cab also. Every now and then,someone leaves the cab door on a M7 closed to the right-when it is done it is the perfect railfan seat with its own window to boot but that seems the exception and not the rule. Observations from MACTRAXX

  by Terrapin Station
 
MACTRAXX wrote:Every now and then,someone leaves the cab door on a M7 closed to the right-when it is done it is the perfect railfan seat with its own window to boot but that seems the exception and not the rule.
At the rear of the train, right? I wish MNR would do this. It would be a great anti-railfan window and anti-railfan window seat.

-T
http://www.railfanwindow.com/gallery
Last edited by Terrapin Station on Fri Jun 10, 2005 7:03 am, edited 1 time in total.

  by Terrapin Station
 
UpperHarlemLine4ever wrote:This bar is being put on the M3's
Thankfully I haven't encounter it yet. This is really a bummer.

  by DutchRailnut
 
Running with passengers in that front seat is not allowed for several reasons.

Passengers are not to be exposed to real glass due to safety and liability issues, even FRA type safety glass.
(passengers can only be behind FRA appoved lexan)

Anybody on leading end of train has to wear safety glasses.

Only people on list in timetable can be on leading end of a train.

  by Terrapin Station
 
DutchRailnut wrote:Running with passengers in that front seat is not allowed for several reasons.

Passengers are not to be exposed to real glass due to safety and liability issues, even FRA type safety glass.
(passengers can only be behind FRA appoved lexan)

Anybody on leading end of train has to wear safety glasses.

Only people on list in timetable can be on leading end of a train.
Ok, but what about at the rear of the train? Can the rear cab be folded up legally and then passengers can sit in the seats facing backwards with the anti-railfan view? I would love that!

  by DutchRailnut
 
NO because passengers would still be exposed to real glass.

  by Silverliner II
 
DutchRailnut wrote:NO because passengers would still be exposed to real glass.
I'm guessing the end door glass in the M1 through M6 classes are Lexan, then?

  by DutchRailnut
 
yes the door is tinted lexan, but Lexan will not work on windows with windshield wipers as it scratches easely.
The M7 cab has laminated type II FRA glazing.
.

  by Sean W.
 
DutchRailnut wrote:Bottom line is liability.
I have had people witness a suicide and then sue railroad for seeing it.
or parents getting upset cause a train hit Bambi and little johnny saw it.
Yay :) Three cheers for our wonderful legal system ...

"Oh, gee, I'm hypersensitive and I SAW something ..."