• Southcoast Rail

  • Discussion relating to commuter rail, light rail, and subway operations of the MBTA.
Discussion relating to commuter rail, light rail, and subway operations of the MBTA.

Moderators: CRail, sery2831

  by west point
 
Providence line 100 MPH or more service might be needed to be compatible with Amtrak. Marc needs 125 on the Penn line. If Amtrak increases service???
  by mbrproductions
 
MARC already runs 125 on the Penn Line, and are (allegedly) going to be doing it with chargers pretty soon because Amtrak was milking the money out of them with the price to use their catenary. I have heard that some MBTA trains reach 90 mph on the Providence Line, but only if they are an all bilevel set pulled by an HSP46, I have never seen MBTA reach what appeared to me to be 90 mph, so I have no idea whether this is true or not.
  by west point
 
mbrproductions wrote: Sat Jan 22, 2022 10:59 am MARC already runs 125 on the Penn Line, and are (allegedly) going to be doing it with chargers pretty soon because Amtrak was milking the money out of them with the price to use their catenary.
With the number of cars needed on the MAEC Penn line trains it would take 2 Chargers to make speeds needed. Would that even be prudent?
  by Trinnau
 
mbrproductions wrote: Sat Jan 22, 2022 10:59 am MARC already runs 125 on the Penn Line, and are (allegedly) going to be doing it with chargers pretty soon because Amtrak was milking the money out of them with the price to use their catenary. I have heard that some MBTA trains reach 90 mph on the Providence Line, but only if they are an all bilevel set pulled by an HSP46, I have never seen MBTA reach what appeared to me to be 90 mph, so I have no idea whether this is true or not.
All MBTA equipment is limited to 80mph - it is not maintained/certified for normal operation over that. It is all capable of going faster - typically design criteria was either 103 or 110. I can say with pretty good certainty that the overspeed settings on all MBTA equipment is currently right around 82mph. So if you go to fast, you take a penalty brake application.
west point wrote: Sat Jan 22, 2022 12:22 am Providence line 100 MPH or more service might be needed to be compatible with Amtrak. Marc needs 125 on the Penn line. If Amtrak increases service???
Reminder MBTA owns the property, which means they have leverage. The current overtake abilities at Providence, Attleboro and inside of 128 are sufficient for increased service. 100mph won't gain more than a couple minutes on an express train, MBTA's stops are otherwise too close to take advantage.
  by GaryGP40
 
A friend of mine told me that an engineer had told them south-side locomotives were governed at a max of 90 mph, where it was 79 north-side. I wasn't there and I don't know if it's changed. I'd agree though that unless you're running express trains, the distance between many of the stations doesn't make sense to have a 110 mph consist on say something like the Dorchester Branch.
  by CRail
 
All 40 series engines are good for 100, HSPs are good for 90. All coaches are limited to 80. The equipment to be utilized on Phase 2 of SCR does not exist so discussing restrictions based on current equipment makes no sense. We can run brand new EMUs capable of 100mph on brand new track designed for such speeds.
  by GaryGP40
 
I wasn't aware of the coach limit, so thanks! I would think the motive power, curves and grade would be primary movers on this, but there's that factor to weigh in also.
  by Trinnau
 
He's referring to the employee timetable, which is direction to the train crews. With that, the only way you'd be able to exceed 80 is with Amtrak equipment pulled by an MBTA loco. However, as I previously mentioned the overspeeds are set for operation at 80. Some of the equipment will show "90" in the cab on the corridor but it can't be reached.
CRail wrote: Sun Jan 23, 2022 4:02 am All 40 series engines are good for 100, HSPs are good for 90. All coaches are limited to 80. The equipment to be utilized on Phase 2 of SCR does not exist so discussing restrictions based on current equipment makes no sense. We can run brand new EMUs capable of 100mph on brand new track designed for such speeds.
MBTA can simply decide to run their existing equipment faster. It's all designed for 100+ operation and is capable of achieving that. The HSPs were tested at 125 out at TTCI, yet are listed only good for 90. As I've been trying to explain, there is a significant change in maintenance requirements and equipment certification required to run that fast. Doesn't matter if it is existing equipment or new equipment. Those changes cost money, so is the time savings worth the cost? Right now the answer is no, but that could change in the future. This decision isn't unique to the MBTA either.
  by GaryGP40
 
The timetables I have are older so they don't convey what's more current now (they are from the early 90's). Agreed that the maintenance and other requirements are higher, and with that more cost. I'd suspect the MBTA has other fish to fry than spending those dollars on something like that, at least in the short term.

It would be nice to see them planning more long-term, but everyone wants the ROI and 'when can we start making money on this thing?'.
  by MBTA F40PH-2C 1050
 
Trinnau wrote: Sun Jan 23, 2022 11:17 am He's referring to the employee timetable, which is direction to the train crews. With that, the only way you'd be able to exceed 80 is with Amtrak equipment pulled by an MBTA loco. However, as I previously mentioned the overspeeds are set for operation at 80. Some of the equipment will show "90" in the cab on the corridor but it can't be reached.
This is incorrect. When 90 is displayed for ACSES speeds on the corridor, 93 is when a penalty application is applied/enforced. We deal with wheelslip all the time on the corridor at the greasers, add rain/drizzle on the rail, not uncommon for the speedometer to shoot up to the mid to high 80's, even a 90, an immediate throttle reduction will solve this, bringing the speed back down

The HSP's and rebuild F40s have a max operating speed of 93 before a penalty, I am unaware of what the GP40MC's and non rebuild F40's are capped at, I'm assuming 93 all around. Of course depends on the territory you are operating in otherwise. If ACSES equipped, say speed display is 50, at 53.5 mph a penalty will occur if immediate action is not done at once to reduce your speed
  by Trinnau
 
I'm referring to the ATC vehicle overspeed setting, which isn't shown on your ADU. If you hit the ATC overspeed, you still have reaction time before penalty application so it falls in line with what you describe. ACSES has the two different curves, if you hit the lower one (+3) you have time to react but if you hit the higher one (+6) it's instant penalty. So at 53.5 in a 50 it's not a penalty unless you hold that through the allotted reaction time. If you hit 56 though, instant penalty.

Ask your RFE what the vehicle overspeeds are set at.
  by BandA
 
The Hockomock swamp is the largest freshwater aquifer in Massachusetts. It served as a rich hunting grounds and a bastion for the Indians during King Phillips war. It has endangered species and plants, it is a rare atlantic cedar forest, contains habitat of critical concern. It's been under development pressure for a very long time, and is probably 1/4 of it's original size, they don't actually know. But, it is bisected by RT 138 and what looks like a power line and an existing railroad right of way and has been for about 150 years. It was the main route from Boston to New Bedford where passengers would board a steamship to get to New York.

I just want to know how wide the railroad roadbed is. Passenger service ended in 1958. When did freight service end?
  by mbrproductions
 
Interesting history on the Hockomock Swamp. I believe the line was abandoned in 1966 and I think they are planning on building an 8000+ foot trestle over the swamp because its somehow going to be better for the ecosystems there, I don't think its necessary considering that the right of way is already there anyway.
  by GP40MC1118
 
Freight service ended for lack of local traffic and its end as a through route for commuter trains.

I agree about the swamp. Why not a couple of trestles and a series of culverts.
  by scratchyX1
 
mbrproductions wrote: Sun Jan 23, 2022 8:16 pm Interesting history on the Hockomock Swamp. I believe the line was abandoned in 1966 and I think they are planning on building an 8000+ foot trestle over the swamp because its somehow going to be better for the ecosystems there, I don't think its necessary considering that the right of way is already there anyway.
It looks like all bridges are intact, why build a new one?
  • 1
  • 67
  • 68
  • 69
  • 70
  • 71
  • 76