Discussion relating to the operations of MTA MetroNorth Railroad including west of Hudson operations and discussion of CtDOT sponsored rail operations such as Shore Line East and the Springfield to New Haven Hartford Line

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, nomis, FL9AC, Jeff Smith

  by Head-end View
 
Okay, let me ask the question another way. How does the engineer know that he is going to cross-over at the switches ahead? On the LIRR, he knows because the code drops to 60. But how does he know on Metro-North? Does the cab-signal drop to "limited" speed even for a 60mph crossover?
  by Noel Weaver
 
Another way of explaining the signal set up on Metro-North. The way it
was explained to me when I was working Metro-North was that the
present signals are "go/no go" signals. The signal either allows a train to
pass by it or it does not. The cab signal indication informs the engineer as
to how fast the train can proceed. The speed control feature enforces the
cab signal indication.
Noel Weaver

  by DutchRailnut
 
On high speed swiches the sped is same diverging as it is going straigh so we are governed by track speed, max authorized speed over those switches. In other words if switches are good for 65 the track speed is 65.
on slower speed switches a diverging gives you a limited or medium indication on cab signal.

  by RedSoxSuck
 
DutchRailnut wrote:On high speed swiches the sped is same diverging as it is going straigh so we are governed by track speed, max authorized speed over those switches. In other words if switches are good for 65 the track speed is 65.
on slower speed switches a diverging gives you a limited or medium indication on cab signal.
Hey Dutch, what about CP 121? :-)

My understanding is that there is a little 5 mph discrepency there. I maybe be wrong though.


Please note that I don't mean to be agumemtative, I'm just busting your chops. :-)

  by DutchRailnut
 
what discrepancy??? CP121 is 65 mph switches both straight or diverging.
CP119 are 60 mph switches both straigh and diverging(no movable frog)
  by Head-end View
 
Thanks Dutch; now I get it. But correct me if I'm wrong. This means that the engineer has no idea that the track ahead is lined for the diverging route until he actually gets there and starts thru the switch, right? That must catch you by surprise sometimes, huh?

On some sections of LIRR main-line, max. speed is 80, but even high-speed crossovers are only 60, so they know by the code-drop that they will be diverging. And unofficially, often the block operator will tell them by radio that he's going to cross them over at a certain point, but I'm told that's a courtesy.

  by RedSoxSuck
 
DutchRailnut wrote:what discrepancy??? CP121 is 65 mph switches both straight or diverging.
CP119 are 60 mph switches both straigh and diverging(no movable frog)
Oh, I guess was wrong. I could have sworn that an engineer once told me that at CP 121 the speed limit was 65 going strait and 60 diverging, but you guys had no way of knowing which way you were going until you saw the actual points. Could I be thinging of another interlocking?

  by DutchRailnut
 
nope same rules on all high speed switches, on hudson harlem and new haven line.