• Ring of Steel: Fare Gates at BOS, BON, & BBY

  • Discussion relating to commuter rail, light rail, and subway operations of the MBTA.
Discussion relating to commuter rail, light rail, and subway operations of the MBTA.

Moderators: sery2831, CRail

  by FatNoah
 
The gates also seem like they would cause a bottleneck at rush hours and you would have to make sure that you held on to your flimsy paper ticket that you bought on the train to scan at the gate at North Station.
I've been commuting via CR about 3 times a week for the past few months. The gates generally seem to be working fine. For very busy events, they simply open them all and let people through. Occasionally they're wide open because they appear to be broken. During the AM rush, each gate will have a line of a few people waiting, but the gates seem to add about 10-20 seconds to my commute, on average. Inside the gates, the waiting area does seem to have a much higher percentage of people actually taking the train somewhere.
  by Disney Guy
 
Someone mentioned overhead gantries to sense the tickets of large numbers of passengers entering or exiting. This would not work out because the gantries may pick up RFID from tickets of persons walking by the outside (such as going to a Celtics or Bruins game) but not going into the paid area and not riding. Or if someone was headed for one group of gates and saw a shorter queue at another set, he might get sensed a second time when jumping over to the other group of gates.
  by Komarovsky
 
These are non-issues. The first is solved with some basic range gating that would be implemented and calibrated as part of the installation, OTR tolling(eg EZPass) has handled this successfully for decades. The second is solved by using a simple stored procedure to manage the transactions database, every credit card processing company has had this for decades, it's the reason you don't get charged more than once if the POS captures your credit card more than once within a certain timeframe.
  by RandallW
 
These are totally issues (I have done security research related to this problem): passive RFID systems (such as on credit cards) have ranges measured in millimeters (which is why the "tap to pay" works--the cards can't be read reliably at a distance) or require high power systems to trigger the encoded "reflection" (which could interfere with medical equipment and ADA assistive technologies) and active systems (such as EZPass or the system used to tr) require the RFID trigger to cause a battery powered system to respond. Assuming those problems were solved in a safe (passive) or convenient (I'd love a ticket the size of an EZPass) system, simply two device of whatever standard in close proximity to each other (like in a wallet together) would cause the reader to mis-read the cards. I suppose that could be fixed by using facial recognition technology to allow the person holding the mis-read cards get stopped by a guard, or having someone standing at each gate to get confirmation of a good read from every person...

It is far more reliable and less expensive to simply have gates that require the ticket holder to tap or scan their ticket or card--that technology is well known and inexpensive.
  by Komarovsky
 
RandallW wrote: Wed Feb 15, 2023 8:41 pm These are totally issues (I have done security research related to this problem): passive RFID systems (such as on credit cards) have ranges measured in millimeters (which is why the "tap to pay" works--the cards can't be read reliably at a distance) or require high power systems to trigger the encoded "reflection" (which could interfere with medical equipment and ADA assistive technologies) and active systems (such as EZPass or the system used to tr) require the RFID trigger to cause a battery powered system to respond. Assuming those problems were solved in a safe (passive) or convenient (I'd love a ticket the size of an EZPass) system, simply two device of whatever standard in close proximity to each other (like in a wallet together) would cause the reader to mis-read the cards. I suppose that could be fixed by using facial recognition technology to allow the person holding the mis-read cards get stopped by a guard, or having someone standing at each gate to get confirmation of a good read from every person...

It is far more reliable and less expensive to simply have gates that require the ticket holder to tap or scan their ticket or card--that technology is well known and inexpensive.
I agree with you on the last point, but we shouldn't let that keep us from creating a more efficient solution. The issues above aren't insurmountable, certainly, many have been solved at least in part in the loss prevention space. Manual intervention, in the form of guards, conductors walking through the train with a validator, or even "tap at the end of your trip or pay max fare" fill in where the technology doesn't quite reach yet.
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