• Passengers trapped in Van Dorn station.

  • Discussion related to DC area passenger rail services from Northern Virginia to Baltimore, MD. Includes Light Rail and Baltimore Subway.
Discussion related to DC area passenger rail services from Northern Virginia to Baltimore, MD. Includes Light Rail and Baltimore Subway.

Moderators: mtuandrew, therock, Robert Paniagua

  by JackRussell
 

It's 1 A.M., And You're Trapped in a Metro Station


http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/co ... 03549.html
Metro's Van Dorn Street station manager met the day's last scheduled Blue Line train at 12:32 a.m. Friday. He escorted the riders out of the station, then locked up and headed home. The only problem was that the last train for the night hadn't actually arrived yet.

So just after 1 a.m., about eight passengers found themselves trapped inside the station in Alexandria for 30 minutes as they waited for Metro Transit Police to unlock the exit, according to accounts from two of those stranded.
At this point it isn't clear what really happened, but the newspaper story isn't suggesting that the station manager left early - they suggest that there was one additional train after the "last scheduled train".
  by SchuminWeb
 
Communications breakdown somewhere? That's what it sounds like to me - no one communicated to the station manager that there would be an additional revenue train beyond the scheduled one.
  by jamesinclair
 
Thats a 30 minute headway. Why would passengers have been waiting to board this train if it supposedly wasnt coming?

And why werent the preceding or next stations locked as well?


The station manager screwed up.
  by JackRussell
 
They weren't waiting to board - they had just gotten off a train into a station that was all locked up for the evening.

I don't know quite how it happened, but somehow Metro ran one extra train past the "last scheduled train", and there was a breakdown in communications along the way such that the station manager didn't know it was coming and had already locked up for the evening.

At the end of the day, I suppose this is really more of an inconvenience and an annoyance to the passengers. Nobody got hurt, nothing was damaged, and the transit police were able to unlock the gates and let the people out after a 30 minute wait. Still, it is an embarrassment to Metro at a time when they don't need any more black eyes.
  by jamesinclair
 
JackRussell wrote:They weren't waiting to board - they had just gotten off a train into a station that was all locked up for the evening.

I don't know quite how it happened, but somehow Metro ran one extra train past the "last scheduled train", and there was a breakdown in communications along the way such that the station manager didn't know it was coming and had already locked up for the evening.

At the end of the day, I suppose this is really more of an inconvenience and an annoyance to the passengers. Nobody got hurt, nothing was damaged, and the transit police were able to unlock the gates and let the people out after a 30 minute wait. Still, it is an embarrassment to Metro at a time when they don't need any more black eyes.

Sorry, I wasnt clear. I meant that if these 8 people were on the train, then they got on at another station. If the train wasnt scheduled, why would they have been waiting at another station for the train to come?

And there werent only 8 people. Others probably got off at the next stop, why was that station manager waiting for them?
  by justalurker66
 
jamesinclair wrote:Sorry, I wasnt clear. I meant that if these 8 people were on the train, then they got on at another station. If the train wasnt scheduled, why would they have been waiting at another station for the train to come?

And there werent only 8 people. Others probably got off at the next stop, why was that station manager waiting for them?
There are more questions than answers at the moment ... the only answer we have so far is that a train arrived after the last scheduled train and let 8 people off. The rest of the story has not been reported (whether there were others on the train or if other managers were alerted or just happened to have their stations open for the last train).
  by SchuminWeb
 
I guess the question becomes, how are station managers usually notified of late-night service changes that may affect closing? If it was just by a simple PA announcement, that could have easily been lost in other things, especially if they were helping a rider or something at the time the announcement was made. I know that there are announcements made late at night about closing equipment and the treatment of escalators, but those are pretty standard.