• New York Times: "Very Ominous"

  • This forum will be for issues that don't belong specifically to one NYC area transit agency, but several. For instance, intra-MTA proposals or MTA-wide issues, which may involve both Metro-North Railroad (MNRR) and the Long Island Railroad (LIRR). Other intra-agency examples: through running such as the now discontinued MNRR-NJT Meadowlands special. Topics which only concern one operating agency should remain in their respective forums.
This forum will be for issues that don't belong specifically to one NYC area transit agency, but several. For instance, intra-MTA proposals or MTA-wide issues, which may involve both Metro-North Railroad (MNRR) and the Long Island Railroad (LIRR). Other intra-agency examples: through running such as the now discontinued MNRR-NJT Meadowlands special. Topics which only concern one operating agency should remain in their respective forums.

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, nomis, FL9AC, Jeff Smith

  by Gilbert B Norman
 
The NYMTA reports they have enjoyed a 40% farebox recovery - better than any mass transit system. Now, as The Times in the linked article reports, what if the riders never come back?

New York Times

Fair Use:
Today ridership on the subway has crept back up to about a third of its usual levels, from an all-time low of 7 percent last spring. An infusion of billions of dollars in federal aid has kept the Metropolitan Transportation Authority afloat. And the agency, which operates the subway, buses and two commuter rail lines, was further lifted by another $6 billion in President Biden’s sweeping rescue plan.

But the M.T.A.’s long-term survival depends on the return of riders and their fares, which make up the agency’s largest funding source. Nearly 40 percent of the agency’s operating revenue comes from fares, a higher percentage than almost any other major American transit system.
Now I think its premature to blanketly state "they're never coming back", let's see to what extent "Corporate America" HQ'd in large cities dependent upon mass transit embrace WFH. Several around here, as well as several newspaper columnists I read, have stated "how they can't wait to get back".

Lest we further not forget, there are many another business interests also "waiting".

Clearly, COVID has changed our "landscape" more than any public health crisis has in over six thousand years of recorded history. Sure others - even as late as the 1918-19 influenza pandemic have killed more, because so much more of our economy was agrarian than technology, the impact was less severe.
  by STrRedWolf
 
I'd like to see what will happen if things plateaus at 50%, at 60%, at 75%. I doubt we'll get over 75% recovery. I won't be surprised if schedules of services have to be tweaked.
  by Ridgefielder
 
I work in Midtown. My (Chicago-HQ'd) employer isn't fully reopening the NY office until probably June. I know the same is true for many other people I talk to. I don't really think you're going to get a full picture of ridership at this point until after Labor Day.

For what it's worth I've been coming in via MN since September. Ridership has noticeably picked up in the last 2-3 weeks.
  by west point
 
IMO recovery will depend how and when persons get vaccinated. Non vaccinated persons may have to change jobs if business decide to have everyone back in the office. I feel that it is too soon to decide. A wild card is how and if persons under 16 are allowed to be vaccinated by their parents ? That is a problem that if mass vaccinations of these youngsters does not start until September then we cannot really know how persons will return to public transport. I hope it can be sooner.

That is a factor for persons changing jobs as well