• New Book - Susquehanna Succession

  • Discussion related to New York, Susquehanna & Western operations past and present. Also includes some discussion related to Deleware Otsego owned and operated shortlines. Official web site can be found here: NYSW.COM.
Discussion related to New York, Susquehanna & Western operations past and present. Also includes some discussion related to Deleware Otsego owned and operated shortlines. Official web site can be found here: NYSW.COM.

Moderators: GOLDEN-ARM, NJ Vike

  by PeteB
 
Susquehanna Succession

The Former L&HR in Orange County; 1976-2002

TABLE OF CONTENTS

----------------------------CHAPTER TITLE-------------------------------

Introduction/Dedication/Acknowledgements

I Decline under Conrail; 1976 - 1981

II NYS&W and Conrail Share Local Operations; 1982 - 1985

III NYS&W Incorporates a Defunct Bridge Line in a Fledgling Land Bridge; 1986 – 1989

IV NYS&W Enjoys Boom Times; 1990 - 1996

V From Conrail to Norfolk Southern

VI Mega-Carrier Machinations; NYS&W Loses the Stack Trains; 1997 – 1999

VII Quiet Times Arrive; 2000 and Beyond

VIII Beyond the L&HR; on to Port Jervis

Bibliography

The Lehigh & Hudson River Railway was a busy and prosperous bridge line but dependent on its much larger connections. Its demise was engineered by mega-carriers Penn Central and Conrail. Two decades later, the New York, Susquehanna & Western Railway, revived under aggressive management, converted the former L&HR main east of Sparta Jct. into a segment of a busy land bridge line, a transcontinental intermodal routing .But NYS&W was also dependent on its giant connections, CSX and NS. Once these two mega-carriers carved up Conrail in 1999, they diverted the intermodal traffic to their routes east of Chicago. For nineteen months, CSX routed certain trains via the NYS&W until it resolved operational issues on the River Line. This book documents the relatively short “golden era” of NYS&W “stack trains” on the former L&HR in Orange County, NY with a couple side trips westward to Binghamton.

102 pages, 188 color images by author (Pete Brill), glossy paper, soft-cover.
  by PeteB
 
I should have noted the book is available from Ron's Books and the Anthracite Railroads Historical Society.

Pete