• m/v Ever Given

  • For topics on Class I and II passenger and freight operations more general in nature and not specifically related to a specific railroad with its own forum.
For topics on Class I and II passenger and freight operations more general in nature and not specifically related to a specific railroad with its own forum.

Moderator: Jeff Smith

  by kitchin
 
https://www.freightwaves.com/news/us-po ... anal-chaos
Freight Waves ran a story March 29 on the Atlantic container lines to North American affected by Ever Given. About half the ships listed rerouted around the Cape in South Africa. It also serves as a sample of the sizes of the ships and the busiest ports affected:

NY/NJ, Norfolk, Charleston, Savannah (north to south)

Then Halifax, Freeport (Bahamas), Houston, Miami, Freeport (Texas), in approximate frequency and size.
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
"Somebody's gotta pay"; and that somebody is UENME:

Associated Press courtesy of Newsmax

Fair Use:
Egypt is expecting more than $1 billion in compensation after a cargo ship blocked the Suez Canal for nearly a week, according to the top canal official. He also warned the ship and its cargo will not be allowed leave Egypt if the issue of damages goes to court.
Best defer to our Admiralty Lawyers around here as to how Egypt could, considering Ever Given's multinational "chain of command" (Panamanian registry, German management, on and on....), move forth with a civil seizure of the vessel and the cargo.
  by Cowford
 
Just think; the m/v Ever Given was handling close to 20K TEU's, or 10K of what normally is thought of as a Container. Just think that is fifty trains of 100 cars each with two containers per car - and that is simply one of these ULCV's, with cargo which need be handled to inland destinations.
For shame Mr. Norman! To be respectfully persnickety, you're falling into the "TEU vs container" trap with railcars. Intermodal well cars come in a variety of configurations, even leaving aside individual well length: Single-well, three-well, five-well, multi-unit drawbar-connected wells... so, your 100-car train may in reality be 20 cars. The standard unit of measure is wells, or units.
  by D Alex
 
Gilbert B Norman wrote: Mon Mar 29, 2021 1:13 pm Mr. Geep, neither the St. Lawrence Seaway nor the Welland Canal, let alone any inland port beyond Montreal, are capable of handling a vessel of Ever Given's size.
Have either opened for the season yet? Has the St. Lawrence seaway fully thawed yet?

Oh, before anybody blames the captain of this ship for this incident, keep in mind that it was being crewed by river pilots at the time it ran aground. From what I've read about this system, these pilots are all native Egyptians, who not only expect to be presented with "gifts" for their service, but who also often make poor decisions while piloting these ships up and down the Suez.
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
Mr. Cowford, had I noted the term "wells" and said "100 wells" in place of "100 cars", would we "be on the same page"?

I guess it's starting to show my final MILW paycheck was dated December 28, 1981, when all too much of container movement on the road resembled this.

But I thank you with respect for sharing your knowledge of contemporary container shipping.
  by eolesen
 

D Alex wrote: Have either opened for the season yet? Has the St. Lawrence seaway fully thawed yet?
Both opened the last week of March, and marinetraffic.com shows plenty of movements.

Sent from my SM-G981U using Tapatalk

  by ExCon90
 
Gilbert B Norman wrote: Sat Apr 03, 2021 3:25 pm Mr. Cowford, had I noted the term "wells" and said "100 wells" in place of "100 cars", would we "be on the same page"?

I guess it's starting to show my final MILW paycheck was dated December 28, 1981, when all too much of container movement on the road resembled this.

But I thank you with respect for sharing your knowledge of contemporary container shipping.
Complexities like these can even run into money. The agreement between Conrail and NYS&W provided for so much per car over CR trackage. When the well cars came in, CR's interpretation was that each well was a car, while NYS&W contended that five wells constituted one car since only one car number was involved, with only alpha suffixes distinguishing between wells. I never did hear how that turned out.

(Another sign of a bygone age is that siding capacity is now shown in feet instead of cars in employee timetables.)
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
Mr. Ex Con, just the kind of stuff that all too many meetings wasted Umpteen man-hours "discussing".

I once learned that after a merger (which one I cannot recall), there were "Umpteen" hours of meetings regarding whether that car once placed at the rear of a train for the crew would be called a Caboose or a Way Car. Who won? I know not.

But it sounds as if the Conrail/Susie Q dispute involved folding $$$$.

Meantime, back to Great Bitter Lake, where one particular vessel and its cargo await what I think is a likely civil seizure, here is a well written Times Editorial on this whole sorry matter:

Fair Use:
The Ever Given has shined a spotlight on many issues of global sea shipping, which still accounts for 70 percent of international trade. Container ships have been steadily growing in recent years, so that those of the size of Ever Given can’t fit into the Panama Canal and can only barely squeeze through the Straits of Malacca. Yet bigger and bigger ships will soon be afloat, all sailing under the curious international mishmash of the way oceangoing shipping operates — the Ever Given is owned by a Japanese company, operated by a Taiwan company, registered in Panama and managed by a German company. The Taiwanese company, Evergreen Marine, has 11 ships the size of Ever Given, all their names beginning with “Ever G.”

The six-day stoppage also demonstrated how easily maritime choke points can be sealed off, and at what cost. Choke points on sea routes have been a source of conflict through much of history, and the saga of the Ever Given demonstrates just how vulnerable they remain. China, which is hugely dependent on importing oil and iron to fuel its growth, has focused much of its foreign policy in recent years on keeping its trade avenues secure..
Related, some have over the past sixty five years, wondered if the s/s Andrea Doria, a ship so beautiful that one cannot avoid referring to her in the feminine gender (even if named for a male), could have been saved when she foundered off Nantucket resulting from a collision with another vessel owing to the negligence of her Captain. I'm willing to place my bets (I was quite alive and a Fairfield Navy Cadet so I was following the events closely and have read several books since) that the ship could have been saved.

But what if she were? She could not call at any port in the developed world without the certainty of a civil seizure, so her economic value, if any, would have been far less than her insured. So, with the loss of human life quite small (no one lost from the foundering), best just to get the payoff and let her lay.

Such could easily be the m/v Ever Given's fate.
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
Here's an article appearing in today's Wall Street Journal that gives an overview of the effect on commerce the Ever Given grounding has brought about:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/from-beer- ... 1617739499

Fair Use:
Maritime tracking data shows the cargo snared by last month’s blockage as a snapshot of global trade that is usually in constant motion. The varied goods in the containers illustrate the far-flung nature of modern supply chains and show how transportation problems on one side of the world can affect the production of goods and store inventories thousands of miles away.

Shipments delayed by the Ever Given included dozens of containers from Asia loaded with products for flat-pack furniture giant IKEA as well as some Europe-bound apparel shipments for Tommy Hilfiger and Calvin Klein-owner PVH Corp., according to the companies. The crisis also slowed some shipments bound for U.S. East Coast ports such as industrial machinery and auto parts.
Meantime. according to shiptracker.com, Ever Given remains anchored in Great Bitter Lake; apparently a "detention" action:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/suez-canal ... lewebshare

Fair Use:
CAIRO—Egypt won’t release the massive container ship that blocked the Suez Canal for nearly a week in March until its owners agree to pay as much as a billion dollars in compensation, according to local authorities, as they investigate how the Ever Given got stuck and shut down one of the world’s most important waterways.

“The vessel will remain here until investigations are complete and compensation is paid,” Osama Rabie, chairman of the Suez Canal Authority, told state television in Egypt on Thursday.

“We hope for a speedy agreement,” he said. “The minute they agree to compensation, the vessel will be allowed to move.”
Bets, anyone, just how quickly the shipowners will be to meet these demands? My best advice; don't hold your breath on it.
  by eolesen
 
I'm curious to see what the insurers for all the cargo do. Paying ransom to Egypt might wind up being cheaper than paying claims for all the goods in those 20,000 containers.
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
Mr. Olesen, with any investigative agency being within Egypt's jurisdiction, and at this time, no foreign agency invited to join the investigation, Pilot negligence, if any, will never need be disclosed. The cause will be "mechanical failure".

It will either be "Ransom" or an insurance claim settlement; I'm sure such policies provide coverage for seizures by a foreign jurisdiction. Either way, up goes the cost of ocean shipping. Up goes the cost of anything at the retailer of your choice.
  by west point
 
Sea law is complicated. After reading some items it may be the cargo will be attached to pay damages. Hard to believe but it can happen. Strange as it sounds the cargo can be partly responsible. It may be that the shippers will need to have separate shipping insurance on their goods.

None of us can really know what the final results will be.
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
Admittedly off topic, but I noted earlier the s/s Andrea Doria foundering off Nantucket during 1956. Even though I was a Fairfield Navy Cadet and closely followed this story, I realize that more members than not simply "weren't".

Nevertheless, I hope this video will prove interesting - and that the Moderator will allow it to stand.
  by JoeCollege
 
Gilbert B Norman wrote: Sat Apr 10, 2021 8:41 am Admittedly off topic, but I noted earlier the s/s Andrea Doria foundering off Nantucket during 1956. Even though I was a Fairfield Navy Cadet and closely followed this story, I realize that more members than not simply "weren't".

Nevertheless, I hope this video will prove interesting - and that the Moderator will allow it to stand.
Thank you, Mr. Norman, for that enlightening video. Far before my time, I nonetheless knew the basics of the Andrea Doria event, but for most under a certain age, I suspect their exposure to and knowledge of the event is from https://youtu.be/0M9b8zZtoPQ.
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
Hardly a surprise, Wall Street Journal reports that Egypt has formally siezed Ever Given, her cargo, and her crew until the surely lengthy dispute over compensation for the blockage is resolved:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/egypt-seiz ... 1618321419

Fair Use:
…CAIRO—Egypt has seized the container ship that last month blocked the Suez Canal, the vessel’s owner said Tuesday, amid a dispute over how much compensation the country is owed following the weeklong shutdown of the waterway.

The move turns up pressure on Ever Given’s Japanese owner to negotiate a settlement that Egyptian authorities are claiming should be roughly $1 billion for damage to the canal and lost business while the stuck ship blocked a critical artery for global trade.

Shipowner Shoei Kisen Kaisha Ltd. said the waterway’s manager seized the Ever Given after obtaining an order from an Egyptian court, comparing the move to an arrest. “They are still talking to us. So we will continue negotiations on compensation,” said Ryu Murakoshi, a spokesman for the company. He declined to disclose the amount under discussion...
Apparently though, several crew members will be allowed to leave for "humanitarian" reasons.

There have been various reports saying the Ever Given was "speeding; doing 13 in a 9". To what extent this attributed to her grounding has not been immediately established. However, her movement was being directed by an Egyptian Pilot; while he could be overruled by the vessel's Master, such is rather unlikely. Far greater speculation could focus on negligence by that Pilot (gotta get home for a "hot date"), in which case the Canal Authority would have considerable difficulty pressing a claim.