Discussion relating to the operations of MTA MetroNorth Railroad including west of Hudson operations and discussion of CtDOT sponsored rail operations such as Shore Line East and the Springfield to New Haven Hartford Line

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, nomis, FL9AC, Jeff Smith

  by LIRailfan79
 
I've been reading on these boards about how miserable it can be working for a class I RR (Freight, for example; CSX, NS, UP).
few days off, 12 hour days, no ability to make advanced plans, constant calls to come to work, away from home for long periods etc...

i was wondering if anyone knew how this contrasted to the working conditions of the Long Island Rail Road or to Metro-North Rail Road? (Or even Amtrack, in the northeast).
is there a significant difference in the quality of life of employees of the LIRR / MNRR compared to the freight RR's ?

  by RPM2Night
 
I work for a short line, and the conditions could compare somewhat, although not as bad (demanding) as a class 1 freight railroad. On the shortline they do try to plan for us to work a set schedule, although even then we get called at random times to work every now and then. You're also right on with the normal work day being the full 12 hours (sometimes it's even more...while you are only allowed to perform service for up to 12 hours, if you "die" away from your final destination the railroad calls a cab company to pick you up....so, could potentially be waiting for a cab anywhere from 15 minutes to a few hours...which has happened to me due to the cabbie not being able to find the siding our train was on). You're also working out doors in all the elements (rain, snow,wind, extreme cold, extreme hot) and a lot of times on bad walking conditions, as well as having to occasionally battle with a hand throw switch that is stiff, or a hand brake that the previous person left really tight. The thing that I do appreciate about where I work though is that you do things at your own pace. Every now and then you're under pressure (i.e. when Amtrak is just a few miles away and you're still switching out an industry spur).

From what I've seen from the outside and gathered by asking questions, here is what I can put together what working for the LIRR or MNRR might be like. Unless an extreme emergency happens, you will return home right after your shift ends. Normally you won't work much past 8 or 9 hours in a shift. Also, your day is relatively broken up or segmented...you work one route for a few hours, then stand by to catch your next route (although I'd imagine that you have to do paperwork and turn in your money between routes). Plus, unless you're assigned to yard duty moving, building and breaking down trains, you work in a nice dry climate controlled (most of the time) passenger car. With the LIRR, and I'd imagine with MNRR as well, you are on the clock until you can reach the initial station you started at for that shift.

Now, I've only been working for this freight railroad for 4 months. I don't work for the LIRR. So, the things I've said are either my opinion, or vague fact based upon what people have told me when I asked similar questions. I guess if anyone else sees your question, someone who works for the LIRR or MNRR, they could probably give you a more specific answer.

  by Terminal Proceed
 
I work for MNRR - I can say that we have excellent working conditions and a very nice compensation package, both in $ and benefits. We do get to go home every night and we do work in excess of 12 hours on occasion. For the most part, we do stay warm/cool/dry and comfortable, however there are exceptions to that as well. It is still railroad work, so there are times that you are hot/cold/wet & miserable.

I presume the LIRR is the same way - without getting into a comparative dicsussion of LIRR/MNRR.

Kevin

PS - This is not the venue to discuss the merits of who has better compensation packages - anyone that wants - may apply for a jopb and decide for yourself how good the package is.

  by RPM2Night
 
how long is the training period for MNRR, and can you share any details of it the process?
  by mkm4
 
LIRailfan79 wrote:I've been reading on these boards about how miserable it can be working for a class I RR (Freight, for example; CSX, NS, UP).
few days off, 12 hour days, no ability to make advanced plans, constant calls to come to work, away from home for long periods etc...
The Poughkeepsie Journal ran this article that you may be interested in.
Train conductors wear many hats
  by MNRR PA OPERATOR
 
as a Customer service representative/PA operator extra, i must say workin for a CLASS I Commuter Railroad, there is both good and bad, jus like any other job. However, for someone who has always wanted to work for a railroad since age 6, there is more good then bad. on the phone information center, u get all kinds of adventures. NO day in the information center is the same. yesterday i had a caller ask me what time does the 1100am local leave stamford. LOL. today i had a customer become hostile with me over MNR lost and found procedures. i really enjoy working as a Public Address Operator (PA OPERATOR) at either 125th street or in the Operations Control room, because u work hand in hand with the Rail Traffic Controllers, and u participate in some Railroad operations which is challenging, because it requires u think on your feet. I have seen everything from drawbridge failures, to opposite side movements. jus be prepared for n e thing. its gonna be a interesting winter coming up as well!

  by Terminal Proceed
 
So tell us PA - which class 1 railroad have you worked for?

  by MN Jim
 
Terminal Proceed wrote:So tell us PA - which class 1 railroad have you worked for?
Now THAT comment, if it needed to be made at all, should have been made privately. You like putting people down in public?

Jim
  by Nester
 
MNRR PA OPERATOR wrote:i must say workin for a CLASS I Commuter Railroad
By AAR definition Class I Railroads are freight haulers who gross over 277 million/year. Even though Amtrak is not a Class I by definition, they are an AAR member and are listed as Class I based on revenue.

Based on revenue alone, MN and LIRR could qualify. As of the end of June, MN has grossed over 212 million in revenue.

Nester
  by MNRR PA OPERATOR
 
actually terminal proceed.i figured the name MNRR would have given it away.











DROP PANTOGRAPH AND
GO ON DC POWER!

  by Terminal Proceed
 
Hmmm - I never realized MNRR or the LIRR were class 1 railroadsd - maybe I missed something somewhere.

  by Nester
 
Terminal Proceed wrote:Hmmm - I never realized MNRR or the LIRR were class 1 railroadsd - maybe I missed something somewhere.
Since they aren't members of the AAR, they technically *aren't* Class 1s. I just pointed out that they take in enough money in revenue to qualify.

Nester

  by Long Island 7285
 
I may be wrong, but LIRR does not take in enough money a year to be a class 1 so with that MN would probly be the same.

I could be wrong. some do asume LI/MN to be class ones as they follow all the FRA's class 1 rules. each class has a diffrent set of rules from the feds.

  by Nester
 
According to documents released by the MTA, the LIRR has taken in 212.4 million dollars in revenue as of the end of June. At that pace, they will top 277 million dollars before the end of September (if not sooner).

MN is an non-class I associate member of the AAR (along with NYC Transit, which isn't even a railroad). I have no idea why the LIRR is not a member.

Nester