Discussion relating to the operations of MTA MetroNorth Railroad including west of Hudson operations and discussion of CtDOT sponsored rail operations such as Shore Line East and the Springfield to New Haven Hartford Line

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, nomis, FL9AC, Jeff Smith

  by DutchRailnut
 
NYC ran far fewer trains so did new haven, also they had way side signals so speed could be anticipated.
as for technical part, nyc and nh were using different brake shoes than todays railroads
Last edited by DutchRailnut on Wed Nov 19, 2008 9:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
  by Tommy Meehan
 
Since if you don't ask you don't find out-

Has anyone ever heard any consideration to possibly equipping MU cars so the wheels get sprayed instead of the rails?
  by DutchRailnut
 
Where would you put 15 000 gallons of water ??
  by Tommy Meehan
 
DutchRailnut wrote:Where would you put 15 000 gallons of water ??
Very funny.

I was thinking more along the lines of something that could clean or neutralize the leafy residue that adheres to the wheels. That an engineer could spritz a small amount as he entered a bad area or after sliding. Not continual spraying of the wheels from say Spuyten Duyvil to Croton-Harmon. I'm stupid but not that stupid.

Btw, I work in the chemical field. Trust me, there's some pretty amazing compounds out there. Might not work 100% but maybe cut the sliding by a third??

Didn't you once say the old-style brake shoes alleviated a lot of the problems by literally grinding and/or burning the wheels clean??? So maybe they should start looking at the wheels to solve the problem rather than trying to keep I-don't-know-how-many-hundreds-of-track-miles clean.
  by DutchRailnut
 
Tom this problem is being studied by railroads all over world, people with more brains and credentials.
Its not just the USA but in Belgium/Netherlands,Germany etc, I have seen several type of solutions, including solutions in museums in Switzerland.
From Sandite to hand made brooms to push the leafs out of way, from pressure washers, to Silica.
still nothing and it may be a lot longer before a solution is found.
I know a real solution but the tree huggers won't like it, cut everything down to ground level 100 feet at both sides of any track.
It would improve sight, maintenance cost, and flatspots.
  by RearOfSignal
 
Isn't the problem also that MNR can only use actual water on the waterworld and not chemicals because some communities were worried about runoff into local water supplies?
  by DutchRailnut
 
Waterworld was designed in house, by NWP shop and wreck gang under guidance of Master Mechanic Ed Whitney(long retired).
It was always just water as designed.
Sandite was not tried on MNCR because of concerns aboutall watershed area's, LIRR does use sandite.
  by playdough
 
The Mileposts on the seats this morning said that the M7 computers have been reprogrammed to better handle braking in slip-slide conditions, and that engineers have been given additional training on braking in slip-slide conditions. Can anyone provide some more details?
  by Erie-Lackawanna
 
I can't imagine what additional details you'd want to know. What you read pretty much explains it.

Jim
  by Trainer
 
I didn't read the article, but as a very basic question related to the "computer braking" comment, do M7's have an anti-lock brake system similar to those in cars? If so, are they on a unit-by-unit basis, or do the computers manage the brakes on the entire train at once?
  by playdough
 
Erie-Lackawanna wrote:I can't imagine what additional details you'd want to know. What you read pretty much explains it.

Jim
Well, for example, does the M7 now allow the wheels to spin for a few extra seconds before it requires an emergency braking (or whatever the proper term is)? The extra few seconds might give the engineer time to release the brakes, stop the wheels from spinning, and try again (kind of like what you'd do in a non-anti-lock auto, I guess). Have the engineers been instructed to try braking earlier than usual? Later than usual? Pulse the brakes? Avoid braking within certain portions of the track where slip-slide tends to be worst? Etc.
  by Penn Central
 
Trainer wrote:I didn't read the article, but as a very basic question related to the "computer braking" comment, do M7's have an anti-lock brake system similar to those in cars? If so, are they on a unit-by-unit basis, or do the computers manage the brakes on the entire train at once?
On M7s, the braking is adjusted for each truck. On other M series cars, the slip slide works on a car by car basis. As far as instruction in operation, engineers are told to avoid heavy braking that can cause slip slide. The M7 problem is troubling because it has an advanced traction system that *should* handle slippery rail much more effectively than it does. The M7s initiate heavy braking on a cab signal downgrade, when the train is over speed, that can cause slip slide when the rail is slippery.
  by tun
 
I wonder if they could retrofit the M-7A's with blowers on the ends of each married pair and have the leaves get blasted away before they get crushed by the train wheels.
  by Nasadowsk
 
Penn Central wrote:The M7 problem is troubling because it has an advanced traction system that *should* handle slippery rail much more effectively than it does.
They seems to be tweaking it still - the last LIRR train I was on, you could hear the inverters trying to deal with the slippage (raining day). Could feel it, too.
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