• Italian motors

  • Discussion about railroad topics everywhere outside of North America.
Discussion about railroad topics everywhere outside of North America.

Moderators: Komachi, David Benton

  by Benny
 
philipmartin wrote:Benny- sorry to hear that the 656.023 got fried on the last day.
So the Italians had "caimans," a type of alligator, and the Swiss had "crocodiles." I wonder if we are talking about the same locomotives?
Jail coach- that's a new one for me. For transporting large groups of prisoners, obviously.
Ciao :wink:
E 656.023 fried itself on May 1976, when the three phase traction ended.

No, the Swiss crocodile was a monophasic locomotive with rods transmission from the 20s that born for the Gotthard route.

Two preserved crocodiles double heading a special train. Photo from SBB historic site
images.jpg
Until the 90s prisoners transport has been made also by rail, with special jail coaches or, in the last times, by purpose built diesel railcars.
Because of the chronic fault of space in penitentiarys, prisoners movement was very frequent and have been convicted that passed their sentence more on trains than between four walls.

The two types of jail coach:
KT 48.405 waiting for restoring in Museo Ferroviario Piemontese in 2002. Photo by S. Paolini
kt48405-071202savigliano.jpg
Kz 48.603 on duty at Vittorio Veneto in 1977. Photo by B. Studer
DSC_2845 copia.jpg
The two images courtesy of Photorail.

Ciao :wink:
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  by philipmartin
 
Thank you or the information, Benny. We have overcrowded jails in the U. S. too.
The Museo Ferroviario Piemontese rings a bell with me because my high school was run by religious order whose founder, Don Bosco, came from the Piedmont district of Italy.
Here's a link to the museum's intriguing looking website. http://www.museoferroviariopiemontese.it/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Better still, here is a video look at the museum, with music by Beethoven to put you in the mood.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZFdlx9Vv54" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
  by philipmartin
 
Short video "CAMBIO TRAZIONE A CHIASSO 18 SETTEMBRE 2010." Motors rolling around the terminal in Chiasso on a rainy day.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t4uBg9I ... 103.630113" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Train movements in Domodossola with the Alps in the background.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YpCh8-DsAYQ" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Bahnhof Domodossola; SF, Schweizer Fernsehen. More yard and train movements around the station.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j4Ryt6iKYMM" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

More shots of various types of rolling stock, Italian and Swiss, rolling around the station in 1991.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tmEMBBBO45A" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2rE2j-t ... 132.813537" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

They have a practice of "flying" (that terminology might not be right,) motors to their track, that is giving them a roll towards it, cutting off and letting them roll in under their own momentum.
The dwarf signals in Domodossola look a lot like Pennsylvania Railroad position light "pot signals," photo below (displaying "stop.")
Bottom: photo of Domodossola.
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  by philipmartin
 
Inside a class E626 at Sestri Levante, Liguria, Italy, and other towns on the Mediterranean Sea. One of them, Manarola, has a church dating from 1338. Background music by Mozart.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SdxUVvqDmgc" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
  by philipmartin
 
Italian steam outing on the ferrovia Avezzano-Roccasecca.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Og2JeewWVjY" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
  by philipmartin
 
Ravenna. I put this in because there is a shot of an Italian freight diesel, (I guess,) on a cut of gondolas, at the end.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xFMtt28m3A4" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
  by JayBee
 
Philip, you don't recognize that Locomotive? Dats a U-Boat(ex-DB Bauriehe 220) now an Italian D220 in service for FER(Ferrovaria Emiglia-Romagna).
  by JayBee
 
philipmartin wrote:
They have a practice of "flying" (that terminology might not be right,) motors to their track, that is giving them a roll towards it, cutting off and letting them roll in under their own momentum.
The dwarf signals in Domodossola look a lot like Pennsylvania Railroad position light "pot signals," photo below (displaying "stop.")
Bottom: photo of Domodossola.
Your close, it is called "Fly Shunting" . Up until a few years ago it was pretty "Cowboy" until a Italian crew "Fly Shunting" a electric locomotive at Tarvisio sent an OeBB Taurus locomotive almost all the way back to Villach. There is a 2% downgrade heading towards Villach and the locomotive hit speeds near 120 kph before derailing and rolling over on a curve. Only the electrical components and the running gear were salvageable. Fortunately OeBB had built a spare body. As it was it cost Trenitalia several million Euros to repair the locomotive, and hence forth all locomotives "Fly Shunted" must have a crewman on board to operate the brakes when the locomotive reaches its own electrification.
  by philipmartin
 
philipmartin wrote:Inside a class E626 at Sestri Levante, Liguria, Italy, and other towns on the Mediterranean Sea. One of them, Manarola, has a church dating from 1338.
If anyone wants a look at Manarola itself, here's a link to a short video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h1iuzRO_00c" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
  by philipmartin
 
JayBee wrote:[
Philip, you don't recognize that Locomotive? Dats a U-Boat(ex-DB Bauriehe 220) now an Italian D220 in service for FER(Ferrovaria Emiglia-Romagna).
Germany was famous for its U-Boats during two world wars- "Das Boot." (Our English friends may not find this so amusing.) And we have "U-Boats" in North America too, built by GE. Thanks for the designations on that engine.
  by philipmartin
 
JayBee wrote: until a few years ago it was pretty "Cowboy" until a Italian crew "Fly Shunting" a electric locomotive at Tarvisio sent an OeBB Taurus locomotive almost all the way back to Villach. hence forth all locomotives "Fly Shunted" must have a crewman on board to operate the brakes when the locomotive reaches its own electrification.
So the overhead wires in this station are of different voltages, which is why the engines being shunted have their pantographs down. I guess the guys throwing the switches have to be extra careful.
Having someone ride the fly shunted vehicle sounds like a good idea.
  by Benny
 
In general, stations on the border with Switzerland and Austria (that use this monophasic 15,000 V) have each end electrified with a kind of current and a neutral central stretch. Trains arrive pantographs down. In Domodossola track #1 is convertible to one or the other current.

Ciao :wink:
  by philipmartin
 
Very interesting, Benny. My company has catenary of two differnt voltiges, and our electric loomotives transition between them automaticly. Our emus have to be transitioned manually and therefore are not used on trains that go from one section to the other.
  by David Benton
 
Monophasic would be called single phase in English.
  by Benny
 
Thanks. Sorry for the mistake.

Ciao :wink:
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