• Honolulu's rail project plagued with wheels too thin and tracks too wide

  • General discussion of passenger rail proposals and systems not otherwise covered in the specific forums in this category, including high speed rail.
General discussion of passenger rail proposals and systems not otherwise covered in the specific forums in this category, including high speed rail.

Moderators: mtuandrew, gprimr1

  by Disney Guy
 
A showcase for light rail in greater Honolulu.

1. Rebuild the route of the Oahu Railway & Land Co. route from East Kapolei to downtown Honolulu (vaguely the portion of the HART line from East Kapolei Station to Chinatown Station) which provided service from roughly 1890 to 1945. Today this part is actually 3/4 done as the existing HART construction so the needed at-grade portion would run from Middle St. Station to perhaps Chinatown Station. A portion of existing thoroughfares would be commandeered and an LRT reservation comparable to Minneapolis or Boston or Houston, to name a few, constructed. A limited number of grade crossings would be provided and they would have crossing gates like in Minneapolis.

2. After that, rebuild a portion of the Honolulu Rapid Transit route from Chinatown to Waikiki (via King St. and Kalakaua Ave, on which there was light rail service from about 1890 to 1940). Unlike back then, there is now a choice of thoroughfares to choose from and commandeer for the new project.

For the above, very little underground utility relocation, very little desecration of buried historic artifacts, and very little unsightly above ground infrastructure are needed.

3. After that, build grade separated portions of roadway for general traffic at additional intersections as desired. Depending on space requirements, some of these might comprise overpasses without turn lanes onto and off of the boulevard with the LRT route, and some regular streets reconfigured as one way street pairs..
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
This New York Times article not only addresses the HART boondoggle, but also others about, such as New York East Side Access, and the CAHSR.

Fair Use:
.As the nation sets out on a national spending spree fueled by the $1.2 trillion infrastructure bill signed by President Biden this month, the job ahead carries enormous risks that the projects will face the same kind of cost, schedule and technical problems that have hobbled ambitious efforts from New York to Seattle, delaying benefits to the public and driving up the price tag that taxpayers ultimately will bear.
Let's hope that if there is sufficient funding within IIJA21 to cover both Gateway and the B&P tunnels, which appears questionable, they are not lumped in with these noted projects.