• Graffiti Overload

  • For topics on Class I and II passenger and freight operations more general in nature and not specifically related to a specific railroad with its own forum.
For topics on Class I and II passenger and freight operations more general in nature and not specifically related to a specific railroad with its own forum.

Moderator: Jeff Smith

  by bostontrainguy
 
Personally I am really sick and tired seeing all of the ridiculous graffiti plastered on just about every railcar out there. Trains have become a real eyesore. There are anti-graffiti products out there and I have to ask if any railroad or car builder is using anything to help with the situation. It's getting out of hand.

https://www.sherwin-williams.com/painti ... raffiticoa

Maybe with a product like this a pressure washer spray could be applied to cars as they leave yards? Maybe a good rain would help too? Just wondering if there is any effort being addressed to this problem.

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  by mbrproductions
 
Finally someone I can agree with! It's about time this graffiti fad died out, it's ugly as hell and makes the trains look ghetto, which in turn makes the neighborhoods those trains pass through look intimidating and less desirable. Unfortunately, I don't think the freight railroads are doing much to remove it, where I live we see tank cars everyday, and 3/4 of them are covered all over with it. Hopefully this will change
  by ExCon90
 
Anybody have a feel for how much of this defacement takes place on railroad property vs. on shippers' sidings? And would a hedge fund care?
  by bostontrainguy
 
Let's take a look at the Juice Train. Probably not done at Tropicana or distribution facility which I would think are secured facilities. So probably done in yards along the way? This may give some idea but anecdotal. A nice white "canvas" would seem irresistible.

The way it used to be:

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And now:

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  by scratchyX1
 
ExCon90 wrote: Thu May 26, 2022 11:14 pm Anybody have a feel for how much of this defacement takes place on railroad property vs. on shippers' sidings? And would a hedge fund care?
I know Graffiti happens all over europe, too.
I do wonder, at which point would someone get access to the railcars?
I thought PSR meant they wouldn't be sitting that long.
  by ConstanceR46
 
i argue; how many of you would take a second glance at a "clean" covered hopper or gondola?
  by umtrr-author
 
There are so few clean cars left that they immediately get my attention.

Taggers have also expanded to locomotives... I've seen UP units with, ahem, additional decoration.
  by hrsn
 
It would be interesting to see a photo timeline of grafitti on rolling stock, extending back from today's ubiquitous tagging to...the 1960s when "it started"? Or before....in certain areas or yards? When did the RR police give up on this? Old timers reading this...When did the era of clean cars end?
  by ExCon90
 
bostontrainguy wrote: Fri May 27, 2022 8:37 am Let's take a look at the Juice Train. Probably not done at Tropicana or distribution facility which I would think are secured facilities. So probably done in yards along the way? This may give some idea but anecdotal. A nice white "canvas" would seem irresistible.

The way it used to be:

Image

And now:

Image
That's an interesting point. The whole object of the OJ train was to keep it moving; the cars were cooled only by an outside power source at the origin terminal, and once the landlines were unplugged just prior to departure the temperature in the cars would hold for 48 hours. The scheduled transit time was 36 hours, with no intermediate yarding, and everybody understood that this train had to make schedule every time. (I wasn't in the group that set it up, but I understand that a significant factor in the economics was that the cars only had to be insulated, not equipped with conventional diesel refrigeration equipment.) I did hear that in later years the empties would be released as they were unloaded and moved in regular freight service back to the origin to be reassembled into a train for cooling and reloading.

Goodness knows freight cars are "motionless in transit" often enough for the vandals to get at them, but it's surprising that the OJ train was victimized.