• Finishing an Arrow III in HO scale

  • Discussion related to everything about model railroading, from layout design and planning, to reviews of related model tools and equipment. Discussion includes O, S, HO, N and Z, as well as narrow gauge topics. Also includes discussion of traditional "toy train" and "collector" topics such as Lionel, American Flyer, Marx, and others. Also includes discussion of outdoor garden railways and live steamers.
Discussion related to everything about model railroading, from layout design and planning, to reviews of related model tools and equipment. Discussion includes O, S, HO, N and Z, as well as narrow gauge topics. Also includes discussion of traditional "toy train" and "collector" topics such as Lionel, American Flyer, Marx, and others. Also includes discussion of outdoor garden railways and live steamers.

Moderators: 3rdrail, stilson4283, Otto Vondrak

  by dasher5272
 
Can anyone tell me how to complete an IMW Arrow III? I'm kind of new at this kind of stuff.
  by green_elite_cab
 
did it come with instructions?

I'm not sure how to answer that question. I've seen the kits, and they look relatively straight forward. I would start by cleaning the flash out from the windows and along the edges, on the body and all other parts.

You'll want to use a set of jewelers files, an exacto blade, and a sanding block. If it all possible, avoid taking away to much material.

Using prototype photos, remove any extra material around the end doors. there is an unnecessary lip on the door in this area.

Now would be the best time to use a pinvise to drill out all headlight, class light, and ditch light locations. Drill out any other part locations, such as horns, handrails, roof-top details, pantographs.

After you've prepped the shell, paint it. Save the decals for the last step. Silver paint, or Alclad Chrome works well for simulating the metallic body of these cars. Polly Scale Stainless steel matches the "end" faces, which are brushed steel and a little duller than the sides. The underframe is black, though some parts are a gray-tan (probably from dirt and grime), so check the photos.

Now make any extra sub-assemblies. Assemble the pantographs if necessary, and attach them. I personally would paint the roof-top resistor grids before folding and attaching to the car body, but its up to you.

Assemble the trucks and mount them on the floor/frame. If you have a power truck, now is the time to install it. do all the wiring for the lights now.

apply decals, and give it a clear coat.

When this is dry, add the windows.

You can now fit the body shell to the floor, and install couplers.

Thats roughly how I'd do it.
  by dasher5272
 
what clear coat is best to use?
  by dasher5272
 
what gloss is best to use?
  by green_elite_cab
 
It depends on what you're doing.

If you've painted it silver or metallic, you DEFINITELY DO NOT WANT TO PUT A FLAT FINISH ON.

I personally prefer floquil's crystal cote. its a little thinner than the gloss cote, and I just like how it looks better.


"Glosscoat" could also work but it tends to go on slightly "thicker". Crystal coat creates a "wet" shiny look, like perhaps rain has just fallen on the unit. gloss coat gives a more enamel-like gloss. there is definitely a difference, but its up to your personal preference.

In general, glossy clear coats are best used to apply decals, since they result in the smallest amount of trapped air. Microscopically, flat finishes are like jagged moutain ranges that prevent a decal from seating down all the way, resulting in air pockets and and "silvering", where a decal has a silvery "sheen" from the microscopic air pockets beneath it.

In your case, if you put a metallic finish down, its probably smooth enough for the decals.

HOWEVER

You also want to put a clear coat over your decals as a final protective step agains them flaking off. a final clear coat also hides the edges of decals more easily, making them dissappear.

In the case of an Arrow III, you'll want something clear (crystal cote) or glossy (glosscote), since a flat finish (dullcote) would ruin the metallic appearance of the cars. If you were doing a beat-up freight locomotive, a thinned spray of dullcoat would be more appropriate.
  by Otto Vondrak
 
dasher5272 wrote:what gloss is best to use?
Testor's GlossCote is a standard available at most hobby shops.

Do you have a local hobby shop (that specializes in trains)? Bring your project in and ask the folks behind the counter, I'm sure they'd be happy to help you!

-otto-
  by AntonioFP45
 
For an acrylic/waterbased clear that you can apply decals to as well as seal with, Alclad's Aqua 600 is excellent!

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