• Erie RR converted troop kitchen cars

  • Discussion relating to the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, the Erie, and the resulting 1960 merger creating the Erie Lackawanna. Visit the Erie Lackawanna Historical Society at http://www.erielackhs.org/.
Discussion relating to the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, the Erie, and the resulting 1960 merger creating the Erie Lackawanna. Visit the Erie Lackawanna Historical Society at http://www.erielackhs.org/.

Moderator: blockline4180

  by railvidpro
 
I put this post in the model train section and got no replies so Ill try the 12"to the foot scale

After WW II the Erie and the DL&W obtained some troop kitchen cars and sleepers built by Pullman I believe. for use by the U.S. army

I'm looking for info on the troop kitchen cars that were converted into express baggage cars specifically the color scheme and the number series Pictures would be great.
After the passenger and express dried up these cars went into MW service on work trains

Weaver produced an "O" scale express car but not in Erie they also had a kitchen car with the windows left intact in both erie and DL&W which I think are ficticous

any help would be gratefully appreciated
Lou

  by NYSW3614
 
FWIW, Steamtown has an ex DL&W troop car (sleeper or kitchen, dunno?) with its windows intact. MOW service.

Joshua
  by henry6
 
Two good sources are Stauffer's ERIE POWER and Tabers' "DL&W IN THE 20th CENTURY". Back issues of model magazines and EL mag if you can find indexes for them.

And, there is an Erie kitchen car like you described at Susquehanna, PA.

  by pdman
 
My first trip out on the DL&W mainline was in August 1954 on the Phoebe Snow to visit relatives in Canada just a few miles from Buffalo. I vaguely remember a bunch of cars like the ones described parked at Tobyhanna.
  by isaksenj
 
There was a fairly extensive discussion of the Troop car conversions at the ELDCPS Convention this past weekend. Jay Held's presentation on the various head-end cars included a number of photos of the cars in service, and details and techniques for modeling the cars.

One note was the discussion of how the original trucks were fairly quickly replaced, after their propensity to disintegrate started to become known!

(Guess they were like the the contemporary MB-series Jeep - designed only to go 2000 miles or so! ;^) At least the Jeep was found to be lots more durable....