• Equilateral turnouts

  • Discussion related to the Lehigh Valley Railroad and predecessors for the period 1846-1976. Originally incorporated as the Delaware, Lehigh, Schuylkill and Susquehanna Railroad Company.
Discussion related to the Lehigh Valley Railroad and predecessors for the period 1846-1976. Originally incorporated as the Delaware, Lehigh, Schuylkill and Susquehanna Railroad Company.

Moderator: scottychaos

  by KevinD
 
Can anyone come up with a list of interlockings that were equipped with equilateral turnouts? Did their installation choice have anything to do with approaching track geometry permitting higher speeds? I noticed they are not really identified graphically in any late era track charts. Did it have anything to do with certain sidings equipped with bracket mast signals (where both tracks featured a 'high mount' signal) as opposed to other sidings where there was a high mast for one track and a lower mast/dwarf for the other track? Batavia Int Mar 76 was clearly an equilateral.

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Were all sidings bi-directional, or were there some that were operated like current-of-traffic signaled? Was their a difference in signal indications when entering a siding depending upon the switch type or bi-directional status? I saw a video clip of a train getting a red over flashing lunar to enter a siding (against the current) at a switch that was not an equilateral design. Were there different (upgraded) signal indications also possible depending upon track geometry? Rochester Jct Nov 71 shows snow topped rails on former WB while former EB has seen some traffic.

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  by TB Diamond
 
No list. However, on the west end (Sayre-Buffalo/Suspension Bridge) according to LVRR ETT No. 9 in effect October 27, 1968, speed restrictions, there were two: Batavia Int. and Wyoming Int. which both had a turnout speed of 60 mph. However, the turnout speed for both interlockings was reduced to 25 mph for Batavia Int. and 40 mph for Wyoming Int. in ETT No. 10 effective August 10, 1975.

Passing sidings were bidirectional and signaled for same.

The photo that you posted of Rochester Jct. shows that location when the railroad was still operating under ABS Rule 251.
  by KevinD
 
East of Sayre, I've seen evidence that Laceyville and Falls were both equilaterals. Laceyville had been at the end of double track all the way from Sayre, and was the beginning of 30+ miles of single track through Vosburg tunnel without passing opportunities until reaching Falls. There was another oddly long 30+ miles of single track between Hindman and Ordinance, too.

I wonder if the proximity of the bridge adjacent to Batavia was behind the 60 -> 25 mph reduction. Not the track planner's most brilliant piece of work to place those two features so close together during the single-tracking effort. By those late years LV was dealing with hobbled operations from the near-loss of the river bridge at Athens, so someone probably slapped a slow order to keep any switch-triggered derailment from having the opportunity to damage the Batavia bridge, too. Placing Batavia another 1/4 to 1/2 mile west would have alleviated those fears.
  by TrainDetainer
 
What evidence? Just curious. Both ends of Laceyville siding were standard turnouts in the 90s, as was Falls. Laceyville had a LH on the west end and a RH on the east end and Falls was a RH turnout. My memory isn't what it was but I don't recall any equilaterals east of Sayre when I was running there, including the old CTC sidings between Laceyville and Athens in the late 80s, and I do remember seeing the old signals with their rusty heads turned and broken out at the former interlockings. I can't imagine CR would have spent money on straightening equilaterals to downgrade the line to 25MPH operation.
  by charlie6017
 
KevinD wrote: Thu Oct 14, 2021 3:39 pm East of Sayre, I've seen evidence that Laceyville and Falls were both equilaterals. Laceyville had been at the end of double track all the way from Sayre, and was the beginning of 30+ miles of single track through Vosburg tunnel without passing opportunities until reaching Falls. There was another oddly long 30+ miles of single track between Hindman and Ordinance, too.

I wonder if the proximity of the bridge adjacent to Batavia was behind the 60 -> 25 mph reduction. Not the track planner's most brilliant piece of work to place those two features so close together during the single-tracking effort. By those late years LV was dealing with hobbled operations from the near-loss of the river bridge at Athens, so someone probably slapped a slow order to keep any switch-triggered derailment from having the opportunity to damage the Batavia bridge, too. Placing Batavia another 1/4 to 1/2 mile west would have alleviated those fears.
I believe Wyoming interlocking near Lancaster was also an equilateral. There's no doubt Lehigh Valley made every attempt to save money however they could, so I guess it must have been the most cost-efficient way.

Re: the long stretch between Ordnance and Hinman INT's - this was a steep upward grade for east bounds and drop for west bounds. I'm guessing LV thought this was a good place to pare track since dispatchers probably didn't want to have to start and stop trains in the middle of the hill.

Charlie
Last edited by charlie6017 on Sat Oct 16, 2021 7:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.