• Empire Builder on the Ground in MT

  • Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.
Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, mtuandrew, Tadman

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  by rcthompson04
 
David Benton wrote: Mon Sep 27, 2021 6:41 pm Interesting the media haven't picked up on only 147 or so passengers. Spread over 8(?) revenue cars, with 16 crew.
Is this a normal load over this section? In this case its probably lucky their was not more passengers on the train.
I saw that and was wondering why all the equipment was running.
  by justalurker66
 
There should be at least three train sets for 7/27 turn 8/28 taking multiple days to cross the country. 144/147 people on the train in Montana does not mean that the train is underused elsewhere along the run, and dropped cars might be needed on the return trip. I was surprised to see that there were 17 crew on board.
  by MACTRAXX
 
west point wrote: Mon Sep 27, 2021 8:26 pm It may be that the car on the siding can be made roadworthy. The others on the ground will probably have to have trucks removed and placed on flat cars. regular 89 foot flats will not work for trucks still on as it would exceed plate "H" heights by inches.
WP: The determination of if these seven Superliner cars can be moved on their own wheels should be made as the wreck damage is cleaned up and the tracks are restored back to regular train service.
There looks to be a lack of major equipment damage that would require the use of flat cars.
The use of nine (the first car was a Viewliner baggage car) cars for 147 passengers may have something to do with the ongoing pandemic such as some distancing in coach class as example.

From the photographs available of the seven derailed cars they all look to have held up well under the extreme circumstances of the derailment. Even the three cars that remained coupled together away from the rest of the train look to be sturdy enough to at least be moved to either Shelby or Havre, MT for the NTSB/FRA investigation.
At some point these cars will eventually be shipped to Beech Grove, IN Shop for storage and restoration.

I agree with JL that what caused the three fatalities in this wreck is the top priority of the investigation.
As much as I would like to see a roster of the equipment involved - and what the SEA and POR sections of the train were (7/27 are split at Spokane, WA) - the passengers and crew come first...MACTRAXX
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
Any "corner bets" yet around here which of the ten cars involved have a chance of being returned to service?

My bet is that with the very possible phaseout (especially if Joe does not complete the term; nothing suggests that the LD's are anything more than a "meh" to Kamala) of the LD's, Amtrak will be in no particular rush to return any of the equipment to service.

As I noted earlier, absent "Gross Negligence" (barristers around here will tell you that is a mighty high standard to meet), Amtrak's liability agreement, at least when I was in the industry, with the roads was "no fault". Amtrak, in virtual certainty, has no recourse against BNSF for anything.

But even for Crescent City (Apr '02 Auto Train #52), where there was an incentive to return the equipment to service "on the quick", it still took a year to do so.
  by Matt Johnson
 
While the Talgos got (perhaps unfairly) condemned in the wake of the Cascades wreck, I do wonder if the Superliners are also slightly less safe than single level conventional cars due to their propensity to go down on their sides. I'm guessing the lounge, two coaches, and sleeper that went over are beyond repair and will be scrapped. Given the attrition of the Superliner fleet, if long distance service is to continue then at some point new equipment will be needed. I think the Viewliner is a nice design and it's a shame that CAF had so much trouble with it, but I'm guessing there won't be any more Viewliners produced, so that leaves the future of the long distance fleet an open question.
  by John_Perkowski
 
Trains is reporting one of the widows has filed her wrongful death suit.

As to the train census and consist, we need to remember the Portland section adds on a sleeper, a lounge, and a coach to a regular 10 car consist (2 coaches, 2 sleepers, baggage, diner, lounge, transition sleeper, and two units). We also need to remember vacation season is over and travel still isn’t 100% of pre pandemic.
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
Colonel SIR; that was the combined 7-27(25) consist involved.

Mr. Johnson, if replacement LD equipment is to be ordered, it will be single level and readily convertible to short distance configuration. As to "Private Room" cars, the 75 Viewliners will just have to stay upright and healthy as they will cover the entire National system.
  by lordsigma12345
 
Superliner 2s aren’t going anywhere anytime soon and aren’t even on the radar for equipment replacement - only Amfleet 2 and Superliner 1 are currently being looked at for fleet planning. Were all of these cars SL1? Seems like a big chunk of the SL2 equipment is captive to Auto Train.
  by USRailFan
 
Wouldn't there at the very least be an SLII Transition-Dorm?
  by WashingtonPark
 
MACTRAXX wrote: Tue Sep 28, 2021 8:32 pm
W
The use of nine (the first car was a Viewliner baggage car) cars for 147 passengers may have something to do with the ongoing pandemic such as some distancing in coach class as example.
MACTRAXX
[/quote]

There's no social distancing on AMTRAK anymore as the NTSB evidently feels the almighty mask eliminates any chance of covid in a crowded car.
  by frequentflyer
 
Matt Johnson wrote: Wed Sep 29, 2021 10:13 am While the Talgos got (perhaps unfairly) condemned in the wake of the Cascades wreck, I do wonder if the Superliners are also slightly less safe than single level conventional cars due to their propensity to go down on their sides. I'm guessing the lounge, two coaches, and sleeper that went over are beyond repair and will be scrapped. Given the attrition of the Superliner fleet, if long distance service is to continue then at some point new equipment will be needed. I think the Viewliner is a nice design and it's a shame that CAF had so much trouble with it, but I'm guessing there won't be any more Viewliners produced, so that leaves the future of the long distance fleet an open question.
The Superliners have an amazingly low centre of gravity. The car connects to the bogies at axle level and those heavy AC units sit right above them. A viewliner or Amfleet would have fipped over too on a hill.
  by STrRedWolf
 
John_Perkowski wrote: Wed Sep 29, 2021 11:36 am As to the train census and consist, we need to remember the Portland section adds on a sleeper, a lounge, and a coach to a regular 10 car consist (2 coaches, 2 sleepers, baggage, diner, lounge, transition sleeper, and two units). We also need to remember vacation season is over and travel still isn’t 100% of pre pandemic.
As mentioned before, this was a combined consist. So I'm going to assume 2 engines, baggage, transition sleeper, sleeper, sleeper, diner, coach, lounge, coach, diner, sleeper. They were probably splitting the train in Spokane, letting the Seattle section go, attaching a P42 to the rest, and then shoving off to Portland.
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