Discussion relating to the operations of MTA MetroNorth Railroad including west of Hudson operations and discussion of CtDOT sponsored rail operations such as Shore Line East and the Springfield to New Haven Hartford Line

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, nomis, FL9AC, Jeff Smith

  by SubwayTim
 
Are dogs really allowed on Metro-North trains? I went to New York City back in September and I had my dog, which is a Black Lab/Boxer mix. After hearing or reading somewhere that dogs are allowed on Metro-North, I decided to give it a try. I bought a round-trip ticket to Mt. Vernon West on the Harlem Line at Grand Central Terminal. The first train I was about to board was pretty much full, so the conductor turned me and my dog away, saying the dog has to be muzzled. He also said to try the next train. So I went to the lower level and boarded the next train, which wasn't as crowded, and rode to Mt. Vernon West with no problem. Even some of the passengers came over to pet my dog! The return trip to Grand Central was also problem-free. I'm thinking about doing that again when I make my next trip to New York City sometime in the spring.
Why is Mero-North the only railroad in New York that allows people to take their dogs on the trains? Why not LIRR or the subways?
  by FEC_Fan
 
SubwayTim wrote:Are dogs really allowed on Metro-North trains? I went to New York City back in September and I had my dog, which is a Black Lab/Boxer mix. After hearing or reading somewhere that dogs are allowed on Metro-North, I decided to give it a try. I bought a round-trip ticket to Mt. Vernon West on the Harlem Line at Grand Central Terminal. The first train I was about to board was pretty much full, so the conductor turned me and my dog away, saying the dog has to be muzzled. He also said to try the next train. So I went to the lower level and boarded the next train, which wasn't as crowded, and rode to Mt. Vernon West with no problem. Even some of the passengers came over to pet my dog! The return trip to Grand Central was also problem-free. I'm thinking about doing that again when I make my next trip to New York City sometime in the spring.
Why is Mero-North the only railroad in New York that allows people to take their dogs on the trains? Why not LIRR or the subways?
You might try asking Metro-North what Metro-North policy is. You'll get the right answer.

As for why MN and not the others, MN probably hasn't been sued yet by a bite victim. Give it time, it will happen.

  by DutchRailnut
 
see formal rule below.
Last edited by DutchRailnut on Sun Jan 22, 2006 8:18 am, edited 1 time in total.

etc

  by Noel Weaver
 
I remember back in the 1980's in my Metro-North days, I was running a
daytime weekend New Haven train out of GCT with the first stop Stamford.
I got to the head car of a fairly long train with my "grip" plus another small
bag with a sandwich and a soda or two. I got to the head car, all of the
cars were open, and the doors were of course already open. I walked in
and some guy had a large dog but I don't know what kind of a dog it was.
Lucky for me, the dog was on a lease because he did not like me, he
lunged for me with teeth showing. I said nothing but got in my cab as
quickly as I could and called the conductor on the radio to get the guy out
of that car and preferably off the train. The conductor came up and gave
me an argument so I called the yardmaster at tower A on the radio and
told him I would not run the train with that dog on it. They sent the cops
down, three or four of them I recall, and removed both the guy and the
dog from the train.
The conductor was mad at me but I didn't really care, maybe I saved him
from a dog bite when he came through for tickets.
I also remember back in my NHRR days, working 140 and 143 to Danbury
and 138 and 147 on Sundays. On 147 on Sundays, we would see the
people getting off that train from the Berkshires and many of them had
dogs of all sizes and descriptions, never had a bit of trouble with any of
them. I think they could have had a dog show on that particular train.
Noel Weaver
Noel Weaver
  by grabber
 
Rule 2011-1 Pets
Small domestic animals are permitted on Metro North trains provided they are carried in kennels or similar containers,or are securely controlled on leashes throughout the journey and are not offensive to other customers.

Any customer whose animal exhibits behavior that poses a direct threat to the health or safety of others may be asked to remove his or her animal from the train.

Animals on leashes must never occupy seats. Kennels or containers must not occupy seats when overcrowding conditions occur.

Service animals accompanying disabled customers are not considered pets and are carried without restrictions.
------------------------------------------
:( There is NO muzzle requirement
  by Tom Curtin
 
And your dog being a lab/boxer combo, he/she is probably more ocngenial than most of the two-legged passengers.

  by UpperHarlemLine4ever
 
The rule stated above is rediculous. Wait until someone gets bitten and the railroad is sued. Things will then change. I have checked and MetroNorth is the only railroad in the US that allows a dog on board without being kenneled. The railroad changed the rules because the NIMBY's who ride the trains to Westchester County complained and in an attempt to be customer friendly, the railroad accomodated the "beautiful" people. By the way, a lab/boxer mix is not a small domestic animal by any stretch of the imagination.

  by SubwayTim
 
UpperHarlemLine4ever wrote:I have checked and MetroNorth is the only railroad in the US that allows a dog on board without being kenneled.
Boston also allows unkenneled dogs on their trains during off-peak hours. From what I've read, I know you can take dogs on the "T" (subways and light rail lines), but I'm not sure if it includes the commuter rail lines.

  by UpperHarlemLine4ever
 
Thanks for the information. However a reading of the rule from the T indicates that the operator has discretion as to whether or not to allow the animal unkenneled. No such discretion on Metro North. BTW on the LIRR pets must be kenneled.

  by DutchRailnut
 
you are so wrong about the beutifull people, the same rule has been in mncr manuals since 1984 according very reliable sources.

  by grabber
 
UpperHarlemLine4ever wrote:The rule stated above is rediculous. Wait until someone gets bitten and the railroad is sued.
To my knowledge bites have to date been very rare. in the past ten years I can recall only one , and it was a Conductor who was the unlucky recipient.
By the way, a lab/boxer mix is not a small domestic animal by any stretch of the imagination.
The term "small" is intentionally left open to interpretation by the Conductor. It allows him/her to decide. What is small to me you may consider large. I work with Horses (a domestic animal) so to me dogs are small. If someone wished to travel with a Great Dane,Scottish Deerhound or another large breed I would try to place them in an empty car. As long as a dog was under the owners control and well behaved I have no problems with carrying them.
That said there are some that do not belong on trains and you can spot them with their owners before they board and take appropriate action.

Dog

  by Tom Curtin
 
Note to Subway Tim: I hope I get to meet your dog on a MN train sometime. I bet he/she is great

  by Dieter
 
The rules concerning dogs are vague to flakey and seem to be up to the discretion of the individual conductor. Upon enquiry at the Station Master's office, I was basically told that the policy was up to the Conductor.

I've seen large dogs on board, and small dogs not in kennels. I've also seen people with large dogs flatly turned away and told to try another train, like the guy who started this thread.

The key seems to be behavior. Try and get aboard without the conductor seeing you, and KEEP YOUR DOG QUIET. Well behaved dogs never have their owners reprimanded, and these dogs are popular with everyone around.

A friend with a black lab was turned away, and I don't blame the crew. This dog needs to be flogged on the shanks with a newspaper. My friend, his owner, has always encouraged the dog to jump, and in general, be a pain in the butt. I've never seen a dog muzzled in all my years of riding Central rails around New York.

One year on an inbound New Haven train, we came upon a dog at Mott Haven on the tracks. The engineer slowed, but the poor dog stayed in front of the train, and kept running from the train, clear across the bridge and onto the elevated. The engineer radioed ahead and got permission to stop. The conductor got out the front, and approached the dog which was scared to death. I got out and on the track in front of the train and had to help the conductor lift the dog aboard. That was an experience, needless to say.

The dog was pretty nice, and the conductor said he would take the dog back to the Bronx and set him loose. The dog looked like he needed a place to live, too.

The railway has a heart for dogs. They have to look out for patrons who will complain too. Teach your dog to sit and shut his yap, and you shouldn't have any trouble getting it to where you're going.

Dieter.

  by Noel Weaver
 
Dieter wrote:The rules concerning dogs are vague to flakey and seem to be up to the discretion of the individual conductor. Upon enquiry at the Station Master's office, I was basically told that the policy was up to the Conductor.

I've seen large dogs on board, and small dogs not in kennels. I've also seen people with large dogs flatly turned away and told to try another train, like the guy who started this thread.

The key seems to be behavior. Try and get aboard without the conductor seeing you, and KEEP YOUR DOG QUIET. Well behaved dogs never have their owners reprimanded, and these dogs are popular with everyone around.

A friend with a black lab was turned away, and I don't blame the crew. This dog needs to be flogged on the shanks with a newspaper. My friend, his owner, has always encouraged the dog to jump, and in general, be a pain in the butt. I've never seen a dog muzzled in all my years of riding Central rails around New York.

One year on an inbound New Haven train, we came upon a dog at Mott Haven on the tracks. The engineer slowed, but the poor dog stayed in front of the train, and kept running from the train, clear across the bridge and onto the elevated. The engineer radioed ahead and got permission to stop. The conductor got out the front, and approached the dog which was scared to death. I got out and on the track in front of the train and had to help the conductor lift the dog aboard. That was an experience, needless to say.

The dog was pretty nice, and the conductor said he would take the dog back to the Bronx and set him loose. The dog looked like he needed a place to live, too.

The railway has a heart for dogs. They have to look out for patrons who will complain too. Teach your dog to sit and shut his yap, and you shouldn't have any trouble getting it to where you're going.

Dieter.
They may very well have a heart for dogs TODAY but I remember during
Penn Central days, I was going west from Stamford or some other place
on the New Haven Line into GCT and we got a message on the radio to
be careful of a dog on the tracks around 138th Street. The dog was at
about 140th Street and in the gauge of my track so I stopped and called
MO which said to stand by. We did for a minute or so when a railroad cop
showed up. In short order the railroad cop took out his gun and shot the
dog right in front of not only me but the crew and a good number of
passengers as well. I then got a message from the tower to proceed to
GCT. The cop just left the dog right where he shot the poor thing.
I never ever again reported a dog on the tracks anywhere in my remaining years on the railroad.
Noel Weaver

  by boston774
 
Noel Weaver wrote: In short order the railroad cop took out his gun and shot the
dog right in front of not only me but the crew and a good number of
passengers as well. I then got a message from the tower to proceed to
GCT. The cop just left the dog right where he shot the poor thing.
I never ever again reported a dog on the tracks anywhere in my remaining years on the railroad.
Noel Weaver
Using a pistol in a crowded area with no backstop, and lots of gravel to make ricochets is just brilliant. An absolute mark of genius. I truly hope the MTA has higher standards for their police officers now.