Discussion related to commuter rail and rapid transit operations in the Chicago area including the South Shore Line, Metra Rail, and Chicago Transit Authority.

Moderators: JamesT4, metraRI

  by rail10
 
Are the dead man switches used in the CTA subway to keep trains moving by the motorman similar to the ones used in the nyc subway?

  by Tadman
 
I know the 2600 series uses a cineston key controller, with a twist handle, and the handle is spring loaded to the vertical position, but must be held at horizontal position.

The 3200's have a standard trolley controller with handle spring loaded to rise. Pressure must be kept on the handle to keep it horizontal

2400's or 2200's? Who knows. secondary protection? who knows.

  by byte
 
The 2200s and 2400s are the same as the 2600s. The PCC cars before them had the trolley controller, with the spring loaded vertical mount.

  by MikeF
 
Just a little clarification on Tadman's use of the term "Cineston key" ...

All CTA cars since the 5000's have used reverser keys that are commonly referred to as "Cineston keys." The name comes from the type of controller in the 5000's, 6000's, 1-50's and 2000's. General Electric's (or was it Westinghouse's?) model name for that particular line of controller was Cineston. These were the standard "trolley" type controllers with the rotating handle that had to be held down to supress the deadman feature.

The 2200's, 2400's and 2600's have the "joystick" type controllers with the twist handle described earlier. These controllers, as well as the newer "trolley" type controllers on the 3200's, continue to use the Cineston-type reverser key.

On all the cars mentioned above, releasing the deadman handle results in a "B3" (maximum service rate) brake application.
  by BuddCar711
 
The Kawasaki B-IV on the Broad Street Subway has a dead-man's pedal along with the Cineston.
  by Robert Paniagua
 
I thought the 2600s had the Cineston Master Controller Handle, like TTC's H6s. But the 3200s and 5000s have the same Slide Joystick Controller handle like TTC's T1s and T35A08s Rocket cars and have the Deadmans switch
  by byte
 
To clarify:

5000s (1947) + 6000s + 1-50s: Three point cineston controller. 5000s originally had a 4th point but this was disabled when the 6000s showed up to make sure they'd play nicely with eachother. Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidfulla ... 2991134579

2000s: "Fat" cineston-esque rotary controller, four points of power and four points of brake. Photo: http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidfulla ... 7570765497

2200s + 2400s + 2600s: "Joystick" controller, four point of power and four points of brake.

3200s: Cineston-esque rotary controller, four points of power and four points of brake.

5000s (2009): "Joystick" controller, no notches. Basically a big potentiometer.