Discussion related to commuter rail and rapid transit operations in the Chicago area including the South Shore Line, Metra Rail, and Chicago Transit Authority.

Moderators: metraRI, JamesT4

  by MACTRAXX
 
Everyone: I wonder if anyone realizes that SEPTAs NHSL - Route 100 had acquired a small group of CTA 6000 series cars to address an equipment shortage in the early-mid 90s period. They had modifications for the Route 100 and ran until SEPTA got their new N5s running. There is a thread in the SEPTA section I posted today also with some info I recall on these cars. MACTRAXX

  by F40CFan
 
There are pictures of these at chicago-l.org in "6000 Gallery 3" and "6000 Gallery 13";

http://www.chicago-l.org/trains/gallery/6000s03.html

http://www.chicago-l.org/trains/gallery/6000s13.html

The one in gallery 13 is a little subtle, you might have to look through the abstracts to find it.

  by octr202
 
I have vague memories of those cars when they ran on the P&W (Route 100 if you look on a SEPTA map). I mainly just remember them being loud and slow -- when compared to the Bullets (but just about anything in American transit is slow compared to them, so yeah, that's not a fair fight ;). I remember one trip riding up front, next to the motorman (they usually kept the cab door open, as the conductor was back in the middle of the car), listening to him tell stories in between complaining that he'd never make any schedules without the Bullets.

The P&W was just about the closest thing to an active transit museum in the 80's and 90's. Bullets, even older Stratford cars, old CTA L cars, and Market El cars from SEPTA's city division. At times you never knew what would turn up when you went for a trip.

  by doepack
 
octr202 wrote:I have vague memories of those cars when they ran on the P&W (Route 100 if you look on a SEPTA map). I mainly just remember them being loud and slow...
Along certain subway segments here in Chicago, those cars were so loud, you could barely hold a conversation. As a railfan I hated to see them go, but my ears certainly don't miss the noise...

  by walt
 
Those cars were a poor substitute for the Bullets and the Strafford Cars, even though they were much newer. The Bullets and Straffords had simply been run as much as was possible ( over 60 years for both types), and had devloped serious braking problems, but they, as much as the railway itself, were what made that property unique.

  by Tadman
 
Too bad P&W/Septa couldn't get a bullet-looking replacement. The N5's have no visual appeal to them - kind of like a zamboni on rails.

  by octr202
 
Tadman wrote:Too bad P&W/Septa couldn't get a bullet-looking replacement. The N5's have no visual appeal to them - kind of like a zamboni on rails.
All in all, I find the N5's to be "not that bad." In my backyard I have to see these beasts where PCCs once tread:

http://naphotos.nerail.org/showpic/?pho ... 610394.jpg

I once saw them described in our local press as "If Darth Vader ever used a streetcar, this would be it."

There doesn't appear to be much designed these days for the North American transit market that looks that good, although I find the Minneapolis and Houston LRVs to be pretty good looking (in the modern sense).

  by chuchubob
 
The CTA cars were COLD in the winter; the wind rushed right through them at speed as though they were full of holes.
CTA cars inbound at Radnor