Discussion related to commuter rail and transit operators in California past and present including Los Angeles Metrolink and Metro Subway and Light Rail, San Diego Coaster, Sprinter and MTS Trolley, Altamont Commuter Express (Stockton), Caltrain and MUNI (San Francisco), Sacramento RTD Light Rail, and others...

Moderator: lensovet

  by Jeff Smith
 
https://www.gosbcta.com/project/redland ... ect-arrow/
The Redlands Passenger Rail Project is an advanced regional transportation project designed to connect residents, businesses and visitors to a variety of leisure, education, healthcare and other destinations. This nine-mile rail project provides new transportation choices through the implementation of a new rail service that integrates conveniently with other modes such as auto, bus and bicycle.
https://www.gosbcta.com/wp-content/uplo ... -Bleed.pdf
Overview
The Redlands Passenger Rail Project is an innovative nine-mile regional rail project that provides additional transportation choices through the
introduction of a new rail service, known as the Arrow, which integrates conveniently with other modes of transportation such as auto, bus and
bicycle.

The Arrow will connect San Bernardino and Redlands and will offer residents, businesses and visitors a new commuting option to travel to a
variety of leisure, education, healthcare and other destinations. Diesel Multiple Units (DMUs) have been identified as the preferred vehicle
to provide primary service for the project. The DMUs are powered by an on-board low-emission, Clean Diesel engine which are smaller, quieter,
more efficient, and cheaper to operate than standard locomotive haul coaches, similar to Metrolink. DMUs work interoperably on the same track
as Metrolink and freight train services which allows for all three train services to use the same track in the existing corridor.

In addition to local commuter service, a Metrolink locomotive hauled coach train will also provide round trip express service from Redlands-to-Los
Angeles each morning with return trip from Los Angeles-to-Redlands each evening.
https://www.gosbcta.com/project/diesel- ... nit-pilot/
In conjunction with public transit expansion as demonstrated by construction of the Redlands Passenger Rail/Arrow Project, SBCTA is seeking to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on its transit systems by initially deploying a zero or low emission train and ultimately converting the Diesel Multiple Unit (DMU) vehicles on the Arrow. In 2018, SBCTA was awarded a Transit and Intercity Rail Capital Program (TIRCP) grant for the development and purchase of an additional rail vehicle that will demonstrate the ability to provide zero emission service using multiple unit train sets. The project will also explore the conversion of at least one DMU vehicle used on the Arrow service, so that regular revenue operations are provided by a zero emission fleet, dramatically changing the corridor-level emissions of the new rail service.
  by njtmnrrbuff
 
I am very excited about this project. It will be great for Redlands to be connected to the Metrolink system, even if they will have to transfer at Downtown San Bernardino Station during most hours of the day and on weekends. That one Metrolink train that is supposed to be extended from Downtown San Bernardino to Downtown Redlands will be great for those people who are heading to Downtown LA or another station like Claremont. I have family friends who live in Redlands about a mile and a half from where the Downtown Redlands station will be located. All of the years that I visited them, I have taken Metrolink to the San Bernardino Santa Fe Depot and the last time was in April of 2017. Rather than having to be dropped off or picked up in San Bernardino when visiting them, I can just take the train to Downtown Redlands.
  by lpetrich
 
I got the idea to check this out after noting a Metrolink map that Google Maps retrieved, one that showed construction east of San Bernardino. Then I found this thread and this article: Arrow (commuter rail) - Wikipedia

Project Google Map - click for live closures and detours. -- it was last updated August 9, 2021

The most recent construction alert: Redlands Passenger Rail Project - Construction Alert Week of August 9

"Crews are installing light poles, security cameras, and signage at the stations; installing underground utilities; and preparing for train testing"

So construction still has some way to go.
  by njtmnrrbuff
 
That's great to hear about the construction progress for Arrow. I certainly hope that it will be ready for operation by early Spring of 2022. I may be visiting family in Southern California and I have family friends in Redlands. I would love to ride and railfan Arrow.
  by lpetrich
 
From the most recent construction notices: "On August 2, Tippecanoe Avenue closed for approximately ten (10) weeks. The closure is at the rail crossing only. Crews will be performing drainage work Monday through Friday from 6:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m" Checking a map, I find that it's a 4-lane street and that there is a streambed just south of the rail line.

The farthest that the construction goes is Cook St. a little beyond the end of Park Ave. University Station will be there. A block further east, at N Grove St., the Orange Blossom Trail starts, evidently a continuation of the right-of-way. It continues to E Colton Ave and Wabash Ave, and a rail-line scar continues further northeastward to Nice Ave. and Opal Ave.

Checking on Abandoned Rails I looked in California and I found The Redlands Loop - Abandoned Rails The line is now built over in places, but one can follow its scar just west of Opal Ave.

That street ends at the Santa Ana Trail near the Santa Ana River, and the rail scar continues to Aurantia Park at Greenspot Road in Highland CA. From there to San Bernardino, the line is almost entirely built over, with bits of rail scar surviving here and there.
  by lpetrich
 
Two streets will be cut rather than get grade crossings: 9th St. in Redlands and D St. in San Bernardino. But all of the other crossing streets will be getting grade crossings, as far as I can tell -- no grade separations anywhere.

The construction pictures show double tracks in several places -- how much of the line will be double tracked?
  by electricron
 
lpetrich wrote: Wed Aug 11, 2021 9:12 am The construction pictures show double tracks in several places -- how much of the line will be double tracked?
Answers for questions like yours usually can be found in the FEIS report.
https://www.gosbcta.com/wp-content/uplo ... xB-All.pdf
"SANBAG proposes the construction of a single track and maintenance road with a one mile long passing siding located near the midpoint of the alignment."
And "The entire Redlands Corridor is an approximately ten mile rail segment that extends east from BNSF’s Cajon Subdivision near the Santa Fe Depot in the City of San Bernardino."

Therefore, one mile of a ten mile long line will be double tracked for the sole passing siding, approximately 10%.

That should allow up to 2 trains per hour, or 30 minute headways with two active trains running at a time averaging 30 mph speeds. Any additional train sets will have to be parked off the mainline in a maintenance facility or in the pocket track extension from the two terminal stations.