• Amtrak Borealis: fka Empire Builder 2nd Daily Frequency Chicago - St Paul

  • Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.
Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, mtuandrew, Tadman

  by eolesen
 
I know both PSA and PeopleExpress did inflight ticket lifts as late as 1987. I worked for PE, and about once a month at O'Hare, we'd have someone get on from Newark without a ticket or the means to pay for one, and they'd be met by the police on arrival for theft of services.

But the larger point still remains -- millions of people every day manage to juggle their belongings and present a ticket or the barcode on their phone. Why is it suddenly so impossible to do for rail passengers? Are they just that much less intelligent and capable than someone riding Greyhound or Southwest?
  by superbad
 
When it comes to pulling up tickets on phones or fumbling for paper tickets..... the conductor can just look you up by name, in fact on some Borealis and Builder trains they go through names instead of physically scanning tickets it seems to go way faster
  by Tadman
 
Lets be brutally honest:

There are probaby 20 ways to do this better. Look for best practices at virtually any airline, bus, commuter railroad, etc... This is not a how problem, this is a why problem. "Why doesn't Amtrak want to fix this crappy customer experience?".

Sort of like why doesn't Amtrak want to fix the other myriad crappy customer experiences... marching around CUS like school children... crowding into Detroit's stairwell for ten minutes while waiting for the train to pull up... mysterious cafe car hours... reseating by ac/conductors... two doors open on the Hi at Chicago... the list goes on, the list will grow, there is really honestly little chance anybody in DC will ever care. There is no incentive to care. This hasn't changed in 50 years, why would it suddenly change???
  by Mackensen
 
eolesen wrote: Mon Jun 17, 2024 6:43 pm I know both PSA and PeopleExpress did inflight ticket lifts as late as 1987. I worked for PE, and about once a month at O'Hare, we'd have someone get on from Newark without a ticket or the means to pay for one, and they'd be met by the police on arrival for theft of services.

But the larger point still remains -- millions of people every day manage to juggle their belongings and present a ticket or the barcode on their phone. Why is it suddenly so impossible to do for rail passengers? Are they just that much less intelligent and capable than someone riding Greyhound or Southwest?
This is a problem that does not exist. The way to faster boarding times is through improvements to infrastructure and rolling stock. For infrastructure, high-level platforms (which are also good for accessibility) and platforms as long as the train itself, so that all doors can open. For rolling stock, cars with automatic doors to reduce the dependency on crew for the boarding process.
  by scratchyX1
 
Mackensen wrote: Tue Jun 18, 2024 8:29 am
eolesen wrote: Mon Jun 17, 2024 6:43 pm I know both PSA and PeopleExpress did inflight ticket lifts as late as 1987. I worked for PE, and about once a month at O'Hare, we'd have someone get on from Newark without a ticket or the means to pay for one, and they'd be met by the police on arrival for theft of services.

But the larger point still remains -- millions of people every day manage to juggle their belongings and present a ticket or the barcode on their phone. Why is it suddenly so impossible to do for rail passengers? Are they just that much less intelligent and capable than someone riding Greyhound or Southwest?
This is a problem that does not exist. The way to faster boarding times is through improvements to infrastructure and rolling stock. For infrastructure, high-level platforms (which are also good for accessibility) and platforms as long as the train itself, so that all doors can open. For rolling stock, cars with automatic doors to reduce the dependency on crew for the boarding process.
I've read of platforms that extend in europe, Are there an vendors that build that for The American continents? That way there could be both clearance for Plate $letter freight cars, and high level loading for passenger trains.
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
Mr. Scratchy, it certainly appears there is an Amtrak rule that at low level platforms, boarding or alighting will be done only at vestibule where an Amtrak crew member is stationed.

Now overseas, from their "mid level" platforms, the operators "trust" their passengers to board and alight safely without a "guard".
  by F40CFan
 
Can't even begin to imagine the number of lawsuits there would be if someone had an "accident" boarding or detraining at an unattended door. The ambulance chasers would be on every platform waiting for someone to fall.
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
Regarding Messrs. F40 and Scratchy's immediate, here is the new RailJet equipment with a depressed center "bed" to enable "no step" boarding (and keep their varietal of ambulance chasers over there at bay).

Within this video is a traditional piece of equipment in which I can say first hand, boarding/alighting can be "challenging" - especially with luggage (but Europeans do not have the propensity to bring the kitchen sink the way we do - especially since the advent of rolling luggage).

Owing to health, it looks like I have made my final trip overseas (Could I go on some kind of fully escorted excursion?, sure. But for those around here who know me face to face, know "that ain't me"). So I won't be able.to see this new RailJet equipment "up close and personal".
Last edited by Gilbert B Norman on Wed Jun 19, 2024 8:54 am, edited 1 time in total.
  by Tadman
 
F40CFan wrote: Tue Jun 18, 2024 11:44 am Can't even begin to imagine the number of lawsuits there would be if someone had an "accident" boarding or detraining at an unattended door. The ambulance chasers would be on every platform waiting for someone to fall.
Hundreds of thousands of Americans board at unattended doors all the time. In fact one could make the argument that forcing all the passengers through one or two doors rather than spreading them out to 8-12 doors causes accidents and mishaps by clogging access points and stairs.
  by Jeff Smith
 
Even in tourist service, we will not board or detrain at an unattended trap. I’ve had to “catch” passengers, plus we loudly advise passengers “watch your step, hold the rails”.
  by ryanwc
 
Tomorrow’s northbound seems to be sold out.

EDITED — However, looking at segments, it’s only sold out from Chicago to Milwaukee. Not nearly as impressive. I hope they sold the last five seats for $80 each, in giving up the chance for a Chgo-St.Paul fare.
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