• Acela II (Avelia Liberty): Design, Production, Delivery, Acceptance

  • Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.
Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, mtuandrew, Tadman

  by bostontrainguy
 
Railjunkie wrote: Mon Jan 10, 2022 10:14 am High MAS is great but truth be told..

IT'S NOT HOW FAST YOU GO. IT'S HOW YOU GO FAST.

Let that sink in for a bit.
Would going EXPRESS NON-STOP be a way of how?
  by Railjunkie
 
bostontrainguy wrote: Wed Jan 12, 2022 11:59 am
Railjunkie wrote: Mon Jan 10, 2022 10:14 am High MAS is great but truth be told..

IT'S NOT HOW FAST YOU GO. IT'S HOW YOU GO FAST.

Let that sink in for a bit.
Would going EXPRESS NON-STOP be a way of how?

Not likely, how many trains run express from A to B. The idea doesn't have to do with over all speed.

This idea was taught to me when I first sat in the seat for my OJT as a engineer.

Keep working at it :-D
  by STrRedWolf
 
Railjunkie wrote: Mon Jan 10, 2022 10:14 am High MAS is great but truth be told..

IT'S NOT HOW FAST YOU GO. IT'S HOW YOU GO FAST.

Let that sink in for a bit.
"How" is a bit vague here. Let me take an engineering tack here:

It's faster if you don't have to deal with curves.

It's faster if those curves are banked a bit.

It's faster if you're not going up-hill. It's scarier if you're going down-hill.

It's faster if you're on catenary that supports the speeds.

For numerous examples, see Episode 91 of the "Well There's Your Problem" podcast on Youtube.
  by Matt Johnson
 
My not tongue in cheek response: passengers traveling from New York to Boston don't care if they have to endure slow running on Metro North followed by a couple of 150 mph sprints, or run at a steady 80 or 90 mph the entire time in order to meet the schedule. They just care about the total running time and on-time performance. It's just a few weirdos like me who will endure the slow running on Metro North and travel to Boston for no reason in order to see a couple of Acela 150 mph sprints! :)
  by Railjunkie
 
STrRedWolf wrote: Thu Jan 13, 2022 10:44 am
Railjunkie wrote: Mon Jan 10, 2022 10:14 am High MAS is great but truth be told..

IT'S NOT HOW FAST YOU GO. IT'S HOW YOU GO FAST.

Let that sink in for a bit.
"How" is a bit vague here. Let me take an engineering tack here:

It's faster if you don't have to deal with curves.

It's faster if those curves are banked a bit.

It's faster if you're not going up-hill. It's scarier if you're going down-hill.

It's faster if you're on catenary that supports the speeds.

For numerous examples, see Episode 91 of the "Well There's Your Problem" podcast on Youtube.
Some of your answers are close but again its not speed as you all are thinking of it.

It took me quite a while to figure out what they meant when they shared this little nugget.
  by NaugyRR
 
Acceleration curves. Speed means nothing if you accelerate so slowly that once you reach track speed you have to start braking for the next station or speed restriction. You can have the fastest train on the planet, but if it takes you forever to reach that speed then what's the point.
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
David Benton wrote: Thu Jan 13, 2022 2:39 pm That's why they don't have speedometer s in race cars and motorcycles.
Mr. Benton, even if I'm "not exactly into" either noted motor vehicle (been on a motorcycle once in this life - a client's - and was scared witless. "Don't worry, I don't want to go looking for another Accountant" says he), allow me to note back on the rails is that the Austrian and Czech Rail Jets have current speed reported to the passengers on monitors (along with next stop, how far to it, and ETA).

And, lest we forget, Austria does not represent to have HSR - only H(er)SR.

But 220 klicks ph is still mighty respectable.

Golleee, wonder why Amtrak does not have same in the existing, as well as in all likelihood, the replacement Acela (whatever they be named) "doesn't exactly" escape me.
  by Railjunkie
 
NaugyRR wrote: Fri Jan 14, 2022 5:05 am Acceleration curves. Speed means nothing if you accelerate so slowly that once you reach track speed you have to start braking for the next station or speed restriction. You can have the fastest train on the planet, but if it takes you forever to reach that speed then what's the point.
Your getting warmer but your still thinking of pure speed, acceleration and deceleration do play a part. Keep working on it. :-D

Of course anytime you want to tap out its OK
  by STrRedWolf
 
west point wrote: Sat Jan 15, 2022 1:45 am Speaking of acceleration. Could it be that AX-2s might only use one loco if on schedule and use both locos if late? still cold use both slowing for better regeneration.
The question I have is do they have two locos or just one per trainset?
  by Railjunkie
 
STrRedWolf wrote: Sat Jan 15, 2022 7:36 am
west point wrote: Sat Jan 15, 2022 1:45 am Speaking of acceleration. Could it be that AX-2s might only use one loco if on schedule and use both locos if late? still cold use both slowing for better regeneration.
The question I have is do they have two locos or just one per trainset?
I would think there are two power cars and both would be on line at all times. Dont run under the wire just taking a guess from my time with the tin lizards aka turbos
  by hxa
 
A random guess from someone with a different background:

For passengers, what really matters are not high-speed trains, but high-speed services instead. For scheduled hourly services like Acela, saving a few minutes by raising the MAS is irrelevant as passengers are supposed to show up at stations a quarter or so earlier than scheduled departure time anyway. There are, however. high-frequency high-speed services like the Japanese Shinkansen system. The system operates so frequently that whenever a passenger arrives at the station, he/she will be able to board a high-speed train within just a few minutes. Only at this service level will the increase in MAS make a real difference.
  by David Benton
 
Gilbert B Norman wrote: Fri Jan 14, 2022 7:44 am
David Benton wrote: Thu Jan 13, 2022 2:39 pm That's why they don't have speedometer s in race cars and motorcycles.
Mr. Benton, even if I'm "not exactly into" either noted motor vehicle (been on a motorcycle once in this life - a client's - and was scared witless. "Don't worry, I don't want to go looking for another Accountant" says he), allow me to note back on the rails is that the Austrian and Czech Rail Jets have current speed reported to the passengers on monitors (along with next stop, how far to it, and ETA).

And, lest we forget, Austria does not represent to have HSR - only H(er)SR.

But 220 klicks ph is still mighty respectable.

Golleee, wonder why Amtrak does not have same in the existing, as well as in all likelihood, the replacement Acela (whatever they be named) "doesn't exactly" escape me.
didn't the Talgos have this feature? Or am I mixing them up with the Australian tilt trains?
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