• Acela II (Alstom Avelia Liberty): Design, Production, Delivery, Acceptance

  • Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.
Discussion related to Amtrak also known as the National Railroad Passenger Corp.

Moderators: GirlOnTheTrain, mtuandrew, Tadman

  by Gilbert B Norman
 
This outfit is sure a "sick puppy" at this time:

https://www.wsj.com/finance/investing/a ... n-e0021a46

Fair Use:
Alstom plans to cut around 1,500 jobs and scrap its dividend as part of a cost-savings plan to reduce debt and boost profitability.

The French train maker said Wednesday that it is also considering equity and equity-like issuances, as well as a capital increase, among potential options to accelerate its debt-reduction plans.
  by STrRedWolf
 
Gilbert B Norman wrote: Thu Nov 16, 2023 3:32 pm This outfit is sure a "sick puppy" at this time:

https://www.wsj.com/finance/investing/a ... n-e0021a46
I would say I would be surprised, but I'm not. I've seen this in my industry too many times: Companies merge, the resulting entity realizes it's got too much slack for the workers, some go (ether retirement or firing).

The question now is which workers? Management or mechanics?
  by Gilbert B Norman
 
Be it assured that if there is any foundation to Mr. Wolf's report, some intrepid fan will be "staking out" at 0-dark-30", to record these happenings with whatever high end imaging device is presently "in vogue" (my phone is good enough for me).
  by Railjunkie
 
STrRedWolf wrote: Tue Dec 19, 2023 2:58 pm I'm hearing that they have recently resumed testing the Acela II's on the NEC now in non-revenue moves. Did the FRA get the right data they needed to give 'em the go-ahead for testing?
Amtrak shipped a set back from Hornell last week perhaps that is the set they will use. They also shipped a set back to Hornell for some mystery magic.

Due date for revenue service Oct '24 ish and that's a really hard ish.
  by edflyerssn007
 
Gilbert B Norman wrote: Wed Dec 20, 2023 6:08 am Be it assured that if there is any foundation to Mr. Wolf's report, some intrepid fan will be "staking out" at 0-dark-30", to record these happenings with whatever high end imaging device is presently "in vogue" (my phone is good enough for me).
Pretty sure I saw a picture of an Avelia doing testing in NYC last night on Facebook. Was from 7 train passing Sunnyside.
  by hxa
 
STrRedWolf wrote: Tue Dec 19, 2023 2:58 pm I'm hearing that they have recently resumed testing the Acela II's on the NEC now in non-revenue moves. Did the FRA get the right data they needed to give 'em the go-ahead for testing?
This comes after the recent approval (https://www.regulations.gov/document/FRA-2010-0029-0213) of Amtrak's upcoming PTC modification which includes the Secure Positive Train Stop (PTSR) as a new functionality, one of the FRA conditions for running Tier-III rolling stocks.
  by Railjunkie
 
IF this is what I think is coming as I have already seen key pads installed in some single and dual mode locomotives. It will be just another way to SSSllllooowwww traffic down. Amtrak has already taken a fairly easy procedure and added two extra steps to it. Now the FRA is adding a magic box, thus adding a third, which of course will be bullet proof right out of the box.
  by hxa
 
Just curious... Is Amtrak's PTC so unreliable that it needs to be bypassed that frequently? From what I've previously seen in various POV videos taken along the corridor, it seems that it has a chronic problem of 'missing transponders'. (e.g. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTGLDhYhEJk&t=600s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qy2D_dr ... RailVideos)
  by CSRR573
 
hxa wrote: Sat Dec 23, 2023 6:18 am Just curious... Is Amtrak's PTC so unreliable that it needs to be bypassed that frequently? From what I've previously seen in various POV videos taken along the corridor, it seems that it has a chronic problem of 'missing transponders'. (e.g. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTGLDhYhEJk&t=600s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qy2D_dr ... RailVideos)
These are the write-ups we get almost on a daily basis in Boston
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  by 8th Notch
 
Just curious... Is Amtrak's PTC so unreliable that it needs to be bypassed that frequently? From what I've previously seen in various POV videos taken along the corridor, it seems that it has a chronic problem of 'missing transponders'. (e.g. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTGLDhYhEJk&t=600s https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qy2D_dr ... RailVideos)
No, a missing transponder symbol is only considered an ACSES fault by rule and does not require it to be bypassed. We can only run 79 mph under this condition and while it does happen a few times a trip, it’s usually not enough to cause a delay.
  by Railjunkie
 
The key pads I'm talking about will have nothing to do with missing transponders. It will however have something to do with Rule 241 I'm pretty sure. While a missing transponder message is a PIA like 8th notch said. It's not a super big deal. Even on Metro North were your speed is dropped to 59mph you really don't loose much time. The system is not unreliable it just has quirks shall we say. The older the engine its installed on the quirkier it gets. The 42s and dual modes it sorta plays nice with but the MP15s we used in Albany for work trains forget about it. My personal record for Positive Stop Penalties is 6, that was just trying to turn a couple of private cars on the wye.

I have many "discussions" with the system while running a train I'm sure someone has found them entertaining.
  by Jeff Smith
 
FINALLY: $NYTimes
After Years of Delays, Amtrak Moves Toward Faster Trains in the Northeast

A new train for the busy Washington to Boston route has finally passed a computer modeling test and is set for tryouts on the tracks. Amtrak has no date yet for when it can carry passengers.
...
Amtrak officials said late Friday that the new trains, which had failed an extended series of computer modeling tests, had passed on the 14th try and had been cleared by the Federal Railroad Administration to begin testing on the tracks that run from Washington, D.C., to Boston.
...
The sleek new red, white and blue Avelia Liberty trains are to travel at a maximum speed of about 160 miles per hour because of a limit imposed by the Northeast Corridor’s aging tracks, 10 miles faster than the current Acela trains, and are expected to tilt for a faster and smoother ride around curves. They accommodate up to 386 passengers, an increase of 25 percent.
...
Amtrak gave Alstom the go-ahead to build the trains despite the computer modeling problems because, Amtrak officials said, they felt they had no other choice. More recently, Amtrak officials acknowledged that they failed to put safeguards into the contract with Alstom to protect themselves in the event the company struggled to develop working trains.
...
“I would expect a pretty smooth testing regime from here on out because most of the problems have been identified,” Mr. Mathews said. “We will see how they run now that they will be on the Northeast Corridor.”
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