• ? about old Erie Lackwanna MU car

  • General discussion of passenger rail proposals and systems not otherwise covered in the specific forums in this category, including high speed rail.
General discussion of passenger rail proposals and systems not otherwise covered in the specific forums in this category, including high speed rail.

Moderators: mtuandrew, gprimr1

  by udoittwo
 
Hello,
I found this 8" x 10" picture in a small lot of Railroad items I bought. I believe it is fairly old but not sure. I've found pictures of other EL MU units and they all have a smaller light below the large one on top. This one doesn't. I also can't find the car # in the roster. It is #2537. Is this an old pre-# and was the lower light added later? In other words, can anyone give me any info on this car?
Sorry if I used any incorrect terminology. I really don't know much about these.
If it's not too difficult, I'll try to figure out how to ad a picture.Image[/img][/img][/img]
Thanks for your time and any help,
Karl.
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  by electricron
 
B&W photos make it difficult to suggest what the second light is for, but all the color photo answers the question easily, since the second light has a red lens on it. ;) One is a headlight, the other is a tail light. I'm assuming those without a second light, like your photo above, would have a red marker lantern hung from a hook on the tail end of the train.
  by R36 Combine Coach
 
2537 is a Lackawanna MU motor, built by Pullman/GE 1930. The renumbering into 3500 series might have
been by EL.
  by udoittwo
 
Thanks for the info. I was just wondering.
Thanks again for your time,
Karl.
  by shadyjay
 
If you're referring to the small lights on the two corners of the car by the vestibule doors, then yes, those would be the marker lights. Red facing out, and probably blue facing towards the side. The Lackawanna cars I work on were coach/cab trailers and have the same setup... just no pantographs.
  by nkloudon
 
Weren't marker lights traditionally amber to the sides? To my knowledge, blue lights/flags were used only to protect equipment under repair.
BTW, note the high roof on the second (trailer) car. This indicates that it was one of a group of WWI-era coaches that were converted to MU trailers.
  by ExCon90
 
Yes; in non-track-circuited territory a train displayed two ambers to the rear if on a siding with the switch lined for the main. After another train cleared, the conductor was responsible for switching the two lanterns back to place red facing the rear before the switch at the head end was thrown to permit exit from the siding. The DL&W had an absolute-permissive block system on the single-track Gladstone Branch, but I don't know whether it was in place by the time the M&E was electrified. (The New Haven ordered its streamlined, fluted-side coaches and parlor cars after World War II equipped with built-in red and yellow marker lights just in case they might be assigned to some off-the-beaten-track runs.)