Providence Line Electrification

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Re: Providence Line Electrification

Postby andrewjw » Fri May 18, 2018 4:02 am

MattW wrote:That sounds like a simple planning issue more than anything. MARC runs two types of equipment, NJT, LIRR, MNRR all have diesel and electric fleets. Heck, NJT has EMUs, electric locomotives and diesels.

MARC is moving away from their electrics as fast as they can! And NJT, LIRR, and MNRR are all majority electric and inherited electric systems which were built in the age of steam, not diesel.
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Re: Providence Line Electrification

Postby Nasadowsk » Mon May 21, 2018 9:54 am

andrewjw wrote: And NJT, LIRR, and MNRR are all majority electric and inherited electric systems which were built in the age of steam, not diesel.


And NJT, LIRR, and MNRR all had major electrification extensions in the last 40 years:

Red Bank to Long Branch, and Newark to Great Notch.

Mineola to Huntington and Ronkonkoma.

North White Plains to Brewster North.

MN also converted the New Haven line to 60Hz and restrung the wires.
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Re: Providence Line Electrification

Postby andrewjw » Mon May 21, 2018 9:01 pm

Nasadowsk wrote:
andrewjw wrote: And NJT, LIRR, and MNRR are all majority electric and inherited electric systems which were built in the age of steam, not diesel.


And NJT, LIRR, and MNRR all had major electrification extensions in the last 40 years:

Red Bank to Long Branch, and Newark to Great Notch.

Mineola to Huntington and Ronkonkoma.

North White Plains to Brewster North.

MN also converted the New Haven line to 60Hz and restrung the wires.


But all of these were expansions of existing systems to eliminate the need for passengers to change trains, which is not an issue in Boston where all trains are already transfer free.
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Re: Providence Line Electrification

Postby Arborwayfan » Tue May 22, 2018 9:10 am

Norway operates electric-locomotive-hauled trains over the Bergen Railway and the Dovre Railway, each of which go up above tree line (1222 meters above sea level in the case of the Bergen Railway) and see substantial snow. Also electric container trains. I have ridden Japanese electrics on a line where the snow was almost up to the windowsills. I have trouble imagining that somehow electric traction just wouldn't work in Greater Boston because of snow.

But I can easily imagine that there are advantages to having every locomotive available for every train. Is that the case now? Or at least every south side locomotive available for every south side train? Or are their different cab signals/similar equipment? Do sets routinely stay on one route for days, or do they sometimes run multiple routes in a week or a day? That is to say, I can easily see that it might make sense for the T to keep buying and using only diesels unless there were money to electrify at least all the south side lines.

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