Hobo camps

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Re: Hobo camps

Postby rhallock » Sun Aug 12, 2018 12:04 pm

In the old days, a prime spot for a hobo camp was any place where a train would have to stop or slow down such as a passing siding or signal, or a steep grade. Also leaving a freight yard as a train was just starting to pick up speed. People sometimes romanticise hobos but there have always been some who were hardened criminals or druggies. Some years ago I saw a program on cable TV about certain individuals, mostly out West, who styled themselves "Freight Train Riders of America". It sounds innocent enough, but they were really the worst sort of criminals. Supposedly to be accepted among them, one first had to kill someone else. One man in particular was a serial killer who, after commiting a murder, would calmly sit and read from his Bible. There were interviews with some railfans-turned-amateur-hobos who had had very scary experiences on the rails. That show should be required viewing for anyone thinking about hanging around freight yards.
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Re: Hobo camps

Postby theseaandalifesaver » Sat Sep 15, 2018 12:14 pm

I'm rolling my eyes hard at the above post.
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Re: Hobo camps

Postby Wayside » Sat Sep 15, 2018 1:19 pm

My dad rode trains out through the west when he was a teenager in the 1930s. There were a lot of people wandering around looking for work in those days.
We don't know what we don't know.
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Re: Hobo camps

Postby Plate C » Tue Sep 18, 2018 6:14 pm

Paid a recent visit to a spot. Not going to call it a camp, at least in terms of what people traditionally think of. A spot on either side beneath a bridge, old mattress on one side, cardboard on the other with rocks built up in front so the crew can't see a person sleeping. Discarded toiletries as well as some new ones left for the next traveler. Obvious signs of younger/less experienced riders like beer cans and empty liquor bottles, a few discarded panhandling signs. Modern markings do not involve the old hobo symbols, but plenty of monikers and directions left on the walls and mattress.
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