Biodiesel and the T

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Biodiesel and the T

Postby Zaphod » Mon May 17, 2004 10:20 pm

Anyone heard anything about biodiesel under consideration for the T? Too expensive to do a conversion, even if there is a savings in the long term?
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Postby typesix » Tue May 18, 2004 3:02 pm

Natural gas is the direction the T is heading with the new buses for areas with a lot of pollution problems.
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Postby jwhite07 » Tue May 18, 2004 5:44 pm

Natural gas is the direction the T is heading with the new buses for areas with a lot of pollution problems.


And low-sulfur diesel for everything else (Zero-series RTS, the upcoming Neoplan diesel order, and Commuter Rail locomotives). Apparently the idea of biodiesel has been shelved, for the moment at least.
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Postby jwhite07 » Tue May 18, 2004 6:07 pm

Natural gas is the direction the T is heading with the new buses for areas with a lot of pollution problems.


And low-sulfur diesel for everything else (Zero-series RTS, the upcoming Neoplan diesel order, and Commuter Rail locomotives). Apparently the idea of biodiesel has been shelved, for the moment at least.
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Postby octr202 » Tue May 18, 2004 8:33 pm

I heard recently that biodiesel isn't nearly as good an alternative fuel from an emissions standpoint. I can't remember which one, but basically it reduces one type of gas emission while dramatically increasing another.
Wondering if I'll see the Haverhill double-tracking finished before I retire...
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Postby P2c3689 » Mon May 24, 2004 2:14 pm

How does the other fuel alternative on renewability?

Does creation of the other product produce oxygen gas we can breath?

Just things to think about.

Trevor H.
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Postby trainhq » Wed May 26, 2004 1:46 pm

CNG buses produce considerably less Nitrous Oxides, CO and CO2 than
gasoline. However, they have a problem in that when you refuel natural
gas vehicles, you leak methane into the atmosphere, which is an extremely heat-absorbent molecule, much more so than CO2. This means
that CNG powered vehicles are actually worse for global warming than
diesel, surprisingly enough.

In the long run, hydrogen is the real answer in fuel cells.
During the transition period, it can be mixed with natural gas and burned directly as fuel, with appropriate carburetion adjustments.
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Postby mharter » Wed May 26, 2004 10:32 pm

The only problem is finding the hydrogen, they haven't solved that one yet and there is no technology to do so on the horizon. The only way to produce hydrogen involves the use of natural gas or oil. What would be really cool is if instead of generating the electricity from fuel stored on the vehicle, they could get it from overhead wires. It would be a lot more efficient.

Matt
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