that B&M Pacific in the Piscataqua River

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that B&M Pacific in the Piscataqua River

Postby TomNelligan » Mon Dec 11, 2017 2:08 pm

Today's Portsmouth Press-Herald has an article with photos of some very rusty pieces of ill-fated B&M 3666 that were dredged up during the current Sarah Long Bridge reconstruction project.

http://www.seacoastonline.com/news/2017 ... aqua-river
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Re: that B&M Pacific in the Piscataqua River

Postby Cowford » Mon Dec 11, 2017 9:11 pm

Hmmm. By all appearances, those are the remains of an archbar truck; the 3666's tender surely had trucks with cast sideframes.
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Re: that B&M Pacific in the Piscataqua River

Postby arthur d. » Tue Dec 12, 2017 8:43 pm

I seem to recall that the baggage car directly behind 3666 went in too...
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Re: that B&M Pacific in the Piscataqua River

Postby RGlueck » Wed Dec 13, 2017 11:22 am

Definitely an archbar truck, but the pony truck of the locomotive has also been recovered. This collection of debris may not reflect the latter.
There is a good Youtube video of 3666 being dived on during the summer. The locomotive is surprisingly intact, at least as far as running gear and chassis is concerned. The sheet metal components are almost entirely gone. Depth soundings showed a considerable amount of the tender remaining as well.
My understanding is, all brass and bronze parts have been removed, broken off, or are completely encrusted.
Before anyone goes off the deep end (get the pun?) if the main boiler and frame were retrieved for display, they would oxide into thin sherds of flaking rust when exposed to the free oxygen of the atmosphere. They would probably stink from decaying sea growth. The would bear only marginal resemblance to a powerful steam locomotive. It would remove a significant dive site from the river. The public would get sick of viewing a snarled ball of rust, and the state would eventually cut it up.

As much as I'd like to see parts of the locomotive retrieved, photographed, documented and preserved, we're talk an enormous amount of money and little to show for it in the end. I would rather see a skilled archaeological study, drawings, photographs, and computer imaging completed by UNH or another qualified group.
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Re: that B&M Pacific in the Piscataqua River

Postby chrisf » Wed Dec 13, 2017 12:12 pm

Cowford wrote:Hmmm. By all appearances, those are the remains of an archbar truck; the 3666's tender surely had trucks with cast sideframes.

The tender appears to have had arch bar trucks:
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_bgDRKmnIMvo/R ... 7466-0.jpg
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Re: that B&M Pacific in the Piscataqua River

Postby Cowford » Wed Dec 13, 2017 2:26 pm

I'll be darned. Considering those trucks were so outdated by 1939 (they were restricted from interchange at the end of the year), I'm surprised B&M hadn't already replaced them.

Mr Glueck, I'm with you. And the junk already retrieved provides no historic/educational value worthy of display.
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