Lackawanna Cutoff Passenger Service Restoration

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Re: Lackawanna Cutoff Passenger Service Restoration

Postby njt/mnrrbuff » Fri Aug 04, 2017 7:58 pm

I have said this before but I will say it again. While it would be nice to have commuter rail service to the Poconos from the New York area, especially to accommodate those many Pocono residents who work in the city as well as other towns in Morris and Essex County, don't get your hopes up anytime soon. Much closer to NYC, you have the Amtrak infrastructure woes as well as a lack of track capacity beneath the Hudson River, major hurdles that prevent any new extensions with improved rail service. All parts of the Gateway Project are very important right now before we can get the train, even to E. Stroudsburg, which would be a good terminus because of the right of way having too many curves north of there. As others mentioned, Scranton's economy isn't in good shape, even in Downtown. Wilkes-Barre is in worse shape. Basically, a lot of that area isn't in the best shape. The Stroudsburg and Scranton areas are two different metropolitan areas and they aren't next to each other. Both E. Stroudsburg and Scranton are almost 50 miles apart from each other as the crow flies and it's pretty much a straight shot on 380, after you get off of 80. The excursion trains take about 2 and 1/2 hours to travel between Scranton and the East Stroudsburg area nonstop. Now imagine how long it would take for a NJT train to traverse the Pocono Main making the stops that Lackawanna trains used to make on the Pocono Main-it would take forever. Even in moderate traffic from NYC to Scranton, the car or bus would outpace the train. A Midtown Direct Local running between NYP and Dover, especially on weekends takes just over an hour and a half so imagine how long it would take to get to PA on that. Scranton might be too far for New Jersey Transit to operate. If I worked for NJT or the State of PA, I would probably strongly suggest saying just have NJT go as far as E Stroudsburg.
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Re: Lackawanna Cutoff Passenger Service Restoration

Postby mtuandrew » Sat Aug 05, 2017 11:10 pm

It's true. There also isn't the trick of geography that makes the Cutoff the fastest way between two in-state destinations like there is for Port Jervis to New York City.
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Re: Lackawanna Cutoff Passenger Service Restoration

Postby njt/mnrrbuff » Sun Aug 06, 2017 12:00 pm

While the commuting distance between Port Jervis and NYC is shorter than between Scranton and NYC, it's still a very long trip. Just because it might be 95 rail miles doesn't mean that it's that long of a distance as the crow flies which it isn't. Between Hoboken and Pt. Jervis, the shortest driving route is about 67 miles and in little or no traffic, driving or taking the bus is faster than the train. I don't think too many people use the train to commute between Pt. Jervis and the city or Hoboken since it's a very long ride. I could see maybe a commuter who works in the office a few times a week. The daily commuter ridership begins at Middletown-Town of Walkill station but even that is still a little far.
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Re: Lackawanna Cutoff Passenger Service Restoration

Postby Jeff Smith » Fri Aug 11, 2017 11:54 am

http://www.njherald.com/20170810/new-cu ... -on-track#

A solution to bypass a roadblock to the final environmental permit needed to complete the project to bring commuter rail service to Sussex County cleared a vote by the New Jersey Transit Board of Directors on Wednesday.

The board voted to approve a contract modification for the engineers on the project, Jacobs Engineering Group of Morristown, to go ahead with a design to install a new culvert to replace one that the Department of Environmental Protection had deemed inadequate and could, according to computer models, cause the new station to flood if there were an exceptional storm and the now-existing culvert were to collapse.

Nancy Snyder, a spokeswoman for NJ Transit, wrote in an email, "The general approach is to work with DEP to develop a plan that redirects much of the culvert under the adjoining road, which will minimize the impact on private property while meeting all applicable storm water and other regulations."

According to Corey Stoner, Andover Township engineer, the solution is to build the new culvert under Roseville Road. The stream would be diverted just to the east of the driveway to Hudson Farms West, go through the new culvert and re-enter the streambed about 200 feet west of the driveway.
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Re: Lackawanna Cutoff Passenger Service Restoration

Postby Jeff Smith » Fri Aug 25, 2017 9:14 am

http://www.njherald.com/20170813/from-t ... ves-aug-13

25 years ago

Aug. 13, 1992

Rails offer more commuter service for county

NJ Transit set to purchase 28-mile Lackawanna cutoff

NEWTON -- The restoration of the passenger train service to northwestern New Jersey, which could extend as far as Warwick, N.Y., is part of an ambitious plan unveiled earlier this week which outlines NJ Transit plans to upgrade its passenger service throughout the state.

The reactivation plan includes not only the NYS&W line, but also reactivation and extension of two other rail lines serving northwestern New Jersey. The plans include:

Reactivation of a nine-mile extension of the Boonton Line from its current terminus in Netcong into Hackettstown. According to a transit official, the extension will serve commuters from Hackettstown to destinations along the Boonton and Morristown lines, Newark, Hoboken and New York. The extension will also enable NJ Transit to serve the developing Mount Olive International Trade Center, a transit official said.

A report by NJ Transit officials also notes the state Department of Transportation is purchasing the 28-mile-long Lackawanna Cutoff Right of Way for possible future transportation use. The purchase of the cutoff is being funded by the state's 1989 Abandoned Railroad Rights of Way Bond Issue, which allocated about $10 million for the cutoff purchase.

The line, which stretches from Port Morris in Roxbury into Pennsylvania, runs through Morris, Warren and Sussex counties. Byram, Stanhope, Green and Andover Township in Sussex County are among the municipalities the cutoff runs though.

The cutoff has the potential to provide rail transportation in Sussex and Warren Counties, serve the Delaware River Water Gap Recreation Area, and provide an additional transportation corridor into Pennsylvania, the report stated.

NJ Transit will consider using the cutoff as an extension of its existing commuter rail network as travel demand increases, according to the report.
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Re: Lackawanna Cutoff Passenger Service Restoration

Postby joeycannoli » Wed Nov 15, 2017 8:07 am

Has there been any movement of late on this project? Haven't heard anything for a few months.
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