boy hit by commuter train in Beverly

Discussion relating to commuter rail, light rail, and subway operations of the MBTA.

Moderators: CRail, sery2831

boy hit by commuter train in Beverly

Postby MBTA F40PH-2C 1050 » Wed Oct 13, 2004 5:43 pm

a 16 year old was hit by a commuter train heading for Boston i believe. He was hit at a grade crossing as he was crossing the tracks w/ his bike heading for school. The MBTA police said the lights and gates were working when this happened
MBTA F40PH-2C 1050
 
Posts: 3498
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 2004 7:57 pm

Probably a good boy, but definatelya bad decision.

Postby CSX Conductor » Wed Oct 13, 2004 10:56 pm

As a railroader and a parent, it is hard to say this.....but he should have known better whether he was 14 or 16.

Here's the Herald's report>>> http://news.bostonherald.com/localRegional/view.bg?articleid=48918




http://oli.org/
User avatar
CSX Conductor
 
Posts: 5458
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2004 12:04 am
Location: Boston, Mass

Postby Robert Paniagua » Thu Oct 14, 2004 5:35 am

Yeah I saw that in the news last night. He was described as a "bright and well educated student" but not smart enough to stop at RR crossings....

Maybe his mother should be prosecuted for child neglect...............I don't know.
~Robert Paniagua
Moderator: WMATA :: General Railroad Operations
User avatar
Robert Paniagua
 
Posts: 4418
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2004 6:11 am
Location: Weymouth, MA 02188

Postby trainhq » Thu Oct 14, 2004 12:40 pm

I don't see how he could have missed it. The train was slowing down coming in to the station, so he had to have seen it coming. He just
thought he could make it. I don't think sounding the horn would have
made any difference.
trainhq
 
Posts: 774
Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2004 12:07 pm

Postby CRail » Thu Oct 14, 2004 2:23 pm

I dont know about neglect, a 14yr old kid knows enough physics to know that a trains momentum will easily overthrow a person's whether they are neglected or not.

They complained that the engineer didnt sound the horn but thats because, until january, they arent supposed to.

That kinda hits me close to home because, living in ashland, i cross the tracks at least twice a day on my bike, but i know what bells, flashing lights, and gates mean.
Last edited by CRail on Mon Oct 18, 2004 6:32 am, edited 1 time in total.
Moderator: Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority
Avatar:3679A (since wrecked)/3623B (now in service as 3636B).
User avatar
CRail
 
Posts: 2122
Joined: Tue May 18, 2004 8:27 am
Location: Eastie

Postby Oldhouse 1739 » Fri Oct 15, 2004 12:21 am

The crossing where this tragic accident occurred is at Hale Street and West Street, about 1/2 mile east of the Beverly Farms station. The train may have been slowing for the station but was still moving at a good speed at that crossing. Visibility of Boston-bound trains is fairly good at that crossing, but visibility of Rockport-bound trains is obscured.

Beverly is one of many communities in Massachusetts that has enacted a no horn ordinance. Is this a good idea? Yes, the gates were down and lights were flashing at the crossing and nobody has any business entering when the gates are down. Yet the sound of a train horn immediately directs your attention to the fact that a train is approaching a crossing. Unlike gates and flashing lights that do not move, the train horn directs your attention to the train; as a result you know exactly where the train is. People become complacient about lights and gates at grade crossings and ignore or downplay their importance. A train horn is never forgotten because it physically announces the train is there and directs you to it.

Beverly has more grade crossings than any other community in Massachusetts if I believe what I read in the press. While this may be true, is it necessary to prohibit train horns at all crossings except in time of emergency? (In this case blowing in time of emergency was clearly too late.) Maybe a better strategy is to comply with federal horn requirements at all crossings unless there is another very obvious safety measure in place at that crossing. While this is normally considered to be the expensive four way gates, why not exempt grade crossings at or near stations from horn requirements because trains are moving slowly and are ringing their bells in advance of or at the end of a station stop. Gloucester crossing in downtown Beverly could likewise be exempt because there is is a gatekeeper on duty weekdays (that's another issue but I will not go there now). In short, why not retain the horn requirement but exempt crossings that incorporate other safety measures?

I do not wish to see any more accidents like this one, in Beverly or in any other T territority. Having T trains blow horns at every grade crossing is annoying for residents but by using some common sense it might not be absolutely necessary to blow at every crossing.
Oldhouse 1739
 

Postby CRail » Fri Oct 15, 2004 7:30 am

Fedral law requires horns being sounded at all grade crossings effective january 2005. As of right now, it is not required.
Moderator: Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority
Avatar:3679A (since wrecked)/3623B (now in service as 3636B).
User avatar
CRail
 
Posts: 2122
Joined: Tue May 18, 2004 8:27 am
Location: Eastie

Postby MBTA F40PH-2C 1050 » Fri Oct 15, 2004 1:29 pm

does that include towns that trains can't blow the horns at crossing?
MBTA F40PH-2C 1050
 
Posts: 3498
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 2004 7:57 pm

Postby CSX Conductor » Sat Oct 16, 2004 12:34 am

NORAC operaing rules require sounding of the whistle at all grade crossings (rule 19B) --0-, (that's 2 longs, a short, and a long).

The MBCR employee timetable has special instructions regarding grade crossings on the north side, which specifies the direction in which the movement needs to sound the whistle, or not, except in emergency such as this crossing. The timetable special instructions supersede the norac rule however.

The only crossings at grade that I can think of that have the whistle ban on the south side are Rockwood Street and Seekonk Street in Norfolk,Ma on the Franklin Branch.

All the whistle bans are from the local residents who simply do not want to here the continous horn blowing............many of whom moved in long after the railroads were there. It's like buying a house next to Logan airport tomorrow and asking Massport to direct flights in another direction so you do not need to listen to the jet engines :P
User avatar
CSX Conductor
 
Posts: 5458
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2004 12:04 am
Location: Boston, Mass

Postby CRail » Mon Oct 18, 2004 6:37 am

They also must hold the horn when (theres one in wakefield) a W/R sign preceeds the crossing.
Moderator: Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority
Avatar:3679A (since wrecked)/3623B (now in service as 3636B).
User avatar
CRail
 
Posts: 2122
Joined: Tue May 18, 2004 8:27 am
Location: Eastie

Postby Robert Paniagua » Mon Oct 18, 2004 7:56 am

Yeap, but soon, they will need to install special barriers that raise up from the street surface high enough that a car cant even see over.

What do you guys think about my idea?
~Robert Paniagua
Moderator: WMATA :: General Railroad Operations
User avatar
Robert Paniagua
 
Posts: 4418
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2004 6:11 am
Location: Weymouth, MA 02188

Postby CRail » Mon Oct 18, 2004 9:44 am

Or just build bridges, which would mean elevate a lot of track. $$$
Moderator: Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority
Avatar:3679A (since wrecked)/3623B (now in service as 3636B).
User avatar
CRail
 
Posts: 2122
Joined: Tue May 18, 2004 8:27 am
Location: Eastie

Postby Robert Paniagua » Mon Oct 18, 2004 9:47 am

True, Crail, another good idea.

But as you pointed out, it costs too much money which we can't affourd now........
~Robert Paniagua
Moderator: WMATA :: General Railroad Operations
User avatar
Robert Paniagua
 
Posts: 4418
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2004 6:11 am
Location: Weymouth, MA 02188


Return to Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA)

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: blackcap, diburning and 30 guests