New Orange and Red Line Car Acquisition Process

Discussion relating to commuter rail, light rail, and subway operations of the MBTA.

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Re: New Orange and Red Line Car Acquisition Process

Postby R36 Combine Coach » Fri Apr 07, 2017 12:40 am

Exterior resembles the PA5 (with orange striping in place of PATH's blue). The cab comes close to resembling a radio station.
Since my friend continues to chain smoke nonstop, she is probably an Alco.
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Re: New Orange and Red Line Car Acquisition Process

Postby Kilo Echo » Sun Apr 23, 2017 8:51 am

Instead of simplifying the interior, it seems the MBTA is trying to get fancy. The T could take a few lessons from the TA in New York. For instance, owing to passenger complaints about contoured seats, the seating on all new rolling stock comprises benches only. Also, because the glass dividers between doors and seats on the old R46 cars were a frequent target of vandalism, new cars use closely spaced diagonal handrails (bars) to separate seated passengers from the doors. New York's R160s also feature air suspension and improved soundproofing—enhancements that would be most welcome on the MBTA.
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Re: New Orange and Red Line Car Acquisition Process

Postby typesix » Sun Apr 23, 2017 11:34 am

All new M(B)TA rapid transit vehicles starting with the 01100s of 1957/58 have had air suspension.
Last edited by typesix on Mon Apr 24, 2017 10:40 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: New Orange and Red Line Car Acquisition Process

Postby orange1234 » Sun Apr 23, 2017 2:41 pm

Kilo Echo wrote:Instead of simplifying the interior, it seems the MBTA is trying to get fancy. The T could take a few lessons from the TA in New York. For instance, owing to passenger complaints about contoured seats, the seating on all new rolling stock comprises benches only. Also, because the glass dividers between doors and seats on the old R46 cars were a frequent target of vandalism, new cars use closely spaced diagonal handrails (bars) to separate seated passengers from the doors.


I asked an engineer about why the seats aren't benches instead. He told me that it's easier and cheaper to replace a single broken seat instead of an entire bench. Regarding wind screens (glass dividers), the MBTA has never had them installed on any of their rapid transit vehicles. These cars would the first. I was told that this was a request by Transit Police to reduce incidences of theft where thieves snatch valuable items from passengers sitting next to the divider and running as soon as the doors open. They're used on the buses and vandalism doesn't appear to be a problem.
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