Rapid transit quiz

Discussion relating to commuter rail, light rail, and subway operations of the MBTA.

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Postby Ron Newman » Thu Jun 17, 2004 7:43 am

Reddy: Cambridge and Somerville are not "in the City of Boston".

jwhite: but the transfer for the $4.25 trip is within the fare-paid zone (at Downtown Crossing). Your transfers involving leaving the system, walking on city streets, then re-entering the system.
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Postby Reddy Rocker » Thu Jun 17, 2004 10:10 am

Ron, did you not read the question correctly?

The question said "Outside Boston proper". Please read carefully before responding.
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Postby Ron Newman » Thu Jun 17, 2004 10:12 am

The question reads:

3) In the City of Boston: What tunnel stations exist, if any, outside of Boston proper?

That means East Boston (Maverick), South Boston (Broadway and Andrew), and Dorchester (Shawmut), but it doesn't mean Cambridge or Somerville.

I'm still not sure which, if any, Southwest Corridor Orange Line stations qualify as "tunnel stations".
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Postby jwhite07 » Thu Jun 17, 2004 10:24 am

jwhite: but the transfer for the $4.25 trip is within the fare-paid zone (at Downtown Crossing). Your transfers involving leaving the system, walking on city streets, then re-entering the system.


Yeah, I know. I'm just trying to have some fun with it!

Karl -- Broadway does not have poetry engraved into the platform surfaces. The major artistic elements there are decorative tiles made by schoolchildren on the platform support columns, and Jay Coogan's "Domestic Objects and Tools of the Trade" sculpture mounted above the stairs from the fare collection area to the platform.
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Postby Ron Newman » Thu Jun 17, 2004 12:19 pm

There isn't "non-electrified rapid transit rail" anywhere in the MBTA system. I was just trying to distinguish the Red/Green/Blue/Orange lines from the commuter rail system (which serves many, many other towns).

Someone above listed Orient Heights as one of the stations named after a commercial venture. Can you say more about that?
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Postby efin98 » Thu Jun 17, 2004 12:25 pm

Ron Newman wrote:"All night" means all night -- the bus service never ends. That's what you have in London, Paris, and Amsterdam.

The last Night Owl bus service on the #1 (for example) leaves each endpoint at 2:30 am. The next regular #1 bus leaves Harvard at 5:10 am, or Dudley at 4:37 am. That's not "all night" service.


I consider it "all night" even if it's 2+ hours between buses. What would you expect for overnight weekend service? 2+ hours ain't that bad, at least not compared to other places and on alot of routes...
Last edited by efin98 on Thu Jun 17, 2004 12:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby efin98 » Thu Jun 17, 2004 12:31 pm

Ron Newman wrote:There isn't "non-electrified rapid transit rail" anywhere in the MBTA system. I was just trying to distinguish the Red/Green/Blue/Orange lines from the commuter rail system (which serves many, many other towns).

Someone above listed Orient Heights as one of the stations named after a commercial venture. Can you say more about that?


Was alluding to the steamships/clippers/whalers and other vessels that used to come around that area during East Boston's heyday. Orient Heights, unless it was referring to "oriental people"(I hope not), would allude to the ships that went to the Orient. It's a stab in the dark guess, but I know East Boston, and in particular the area around Orienth Heights, was once a major ship destination.
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Postby Ron Newman » Thu Jun 17, 2004 12:40 pm

I'd define "all night" service as something that ran at regular intervals (even if that interval were hourly) all night long without gaps. Amsterdam is my main reference point for such bus services.
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Postby Robert Paniagua » Thu Jun 17, 2004 7:17 pm

Well, I only wish it was a 24-hour service, even with the bus service guys :-)
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Postby BC Eagle » Thu Jun 17, 2004 8:19 pm

efin98 wrote:
Ron Newman wrote:"All night" means all night -- the bus service never ends. That's what you have in London, Paris, and Amsterdam.

The last Night Owl bus service on the #1 (for example) leaves each endpoint at 2:30 am. The next regular #1 bus leaves Harvard at 5:10 am, or Dudley at 4:37 am. That's not "all night" service.


I consider it "all night" even if it's 2+ hours between buses. What would you expect for overnight weekend service? 2+ hours ain't that bad, at least not compared to other places and on alot of routes...



From the vantage point of a college student who's been caught in town after night owl service has ended, there is most certainly NOT all night service. The walk back from Kenmore to BC was not one I ever intend on repeating.
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Postby CS » Thu Jun 17, 2004 9:51 pm

No, it's not all night. You have a route that runs in close intervals all day through the night and all of a sudden a 3 hour hole and back to normal???

According to the MBTA web site, "Night Owl bus service continues to operate on Fridays and Saturdays until 2:30 a.m"

And that doesn't sound like all night to me. The MBTA seriously needs to have the night owl run every day until the start of service. It's just ridiculous what people have to go through because the MBTA shuts down at 12:30 or 2:30.


So back onto topic...
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Postby efin98 » Fri Jun 18, 2004 8:03 am

I stated before(which you guys conveniently overlooked) it was my OPINION. Some can accept their foul up in missing the bus and can wait, sorry if you can't.
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Postby CS » Fri Jun 18, 2004 7:09 pm

Reddy Rocker wrote:Ron, did you not read the question correctly?

The question said "Outside Boston proper". Please read carefully before responding.


Let's tone it down a bit Karl. Ron's not exactly a veteran here so cut him some slack.
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Postby efin98 » Fri Jun 18, 2004 7:31 pm

CS wrote:
Reddy Rocker wrote:Ron, did you not read the question correctly?

The question said "Outside Boston proper". Please read carefully before responding.


Let's tone it down a bit Karl. Ron's not exactly a veteran here so cut him some slack.


Karl is wrong, Ron is right. Ron answered the question exactly as it was asked in the original post, Karl answered it incorrectly.
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Postby efin98 » Fri Jun 18, 2004 7:59 pm

smashmont wrote:
Ron Newman wrote:There isn't "non-electrified rapid transit rail" anywhere in the MBTA system. I was just trying to distinguish the Red/Green/Blue/Orange lines from the commuter rail system (which serves many, many other towns).

Ah. I thought there may have been some auxilliary Green Line track in Needham or Wellesley, used for railcar deliveries or something.


I think that would be in Newton at Riverside with the connection to the Framingham/Worcester Line. Needham does have a connection, but that has long since been abandoned.
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