CONSTANT EVOLUTION: THE HISTORY OF BOSTON’S SOUTH STATION

Discussion relating to commuter rail, light rail, and subway operations of the MBTA.

Moderators: CRail, sery2831

Re: CONSTANT EVOLUTION: THE HISTORY OF BOSTON’S SOUTH STATIO

Postby 3rdrail » Tue Mar 12, 2013 3:47 pm

livesteamer wrote:Was Boston Model just around the corner (or sort around the corner) from South Station? I do remember a model train store nearby and I would hang out there waiting for my P&B bus to Scituate--this would have been around 1968-70 timeframe.

As I mentioned, it was on or near Kingston St., a block or two away. I remember Herb's first store on Fairmount Ave., Hyde Park @ early 60's, then saw him move to the one near South Station where he was at in the mid 60's. He remained there until some time in the late 60's, when he went to his Canal Street location near North Station. I'll always remember his store near South Station as the funkiest and best. I understand that he later shifted gears and went to Charles Ro in Malden as a clerk, only until it seems that he has saddly dropped off the radar screen. I do not know his status currently. His departure from the public is a loss as he was definitely one of a kind. I bought my first trolley model kit from him (a Type 5) and later, he made up a Cambridge-Dorchester No. 4 car for me scratch-built.
ExCon- I don't know anything about telautographs, but here's a shot that I took of the escalator at old Forest Hills.
http://photos.cityrails.net/showpic/?20 ... r&BOOL=ALL
~Paul Joyce~
[i]Moderator: Toy Trains, Model Railroading, Outdoor and Live Steam

Paul Joyce passed away in August, 2013. We honor his memory and his devotion at railroad.net.
User avatar
3rdrail
 
Posts: 5641
Joined: Thu Jun 29, 2006 11:10 pm
Location: Boston

Re: CONSTANT EVOLUTION: THE HISTORY OF BOSTON’S SOUTH STATIO

Postby butts260 » Tue Mar 12, 2013 3:58 pm

jaymac wrote:Boston Model wasn't in South Station. It was there I learned that O-Gauge was something other than Lionel.

I recall that around 1941 or 1942 there was a model railroad store, sort of opposite South Station near Essex Street, maybe. Would that have been Boston Model? If so, I also learned there that O-Gauge was something other than Lionel!
butts260
 
Posts: 155
Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2009 2:04 pm
Location: Rockport, MA

Re: CONSTANT EVOLUTION: THE HISTORY OF BOSTON’S SOUTH STATIO

Postby ExCon90 » Tue Mar 12, 2013 4:06 pm

3rdrail, that photo is a gem. As Tom Nelligan suggested, you didn't need a sign telling you to hold on to the handrail; it was like riding an escalator and walking uphill at the same time.
ExCon90
 
Posts: 3436
Joined: Thu Sep 18, 2008 1:22 pm

Re: CONSTANT EVOLUTION: THE HISTORY OF BOSTON’S SOUTH STATIO

Postby wicked » Tue Mar 12, 2013 4:40 pm

A wooden escalator from the westbound Red Line platform at Washington/Downtown Crossing lasted relatively late ... I want to say late '80s or early '90s. I forget to which egress it fed.
wicked
 
Posts: 440
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2012 1:17 pm
Location: MBTA Red Line, formerly WMATA Blue/Yellow

Re: CONSTANT EVOLUTION: THE HISTORY OF BOSTON’S SOUTH STATIO

Postby WatertownCarBarn » Tue Mar 12, 2013 5:05 pm

Heh - I spent too much time at Fuchs in my HS days (when I rode the T daily)!
WatertownCarBarn
 
Posts: 79
Joined: Mon May 30, 2011 8:56 am

Re: CONSTANT EVOLUTION: THE HISTORY OF BOSTON’S SOUTH STATIO

Postby livesteamer » Tue Mar 12, 2013 8:03 pm

My entire collection of American Flyer trains came from the selves of Erich Fuchs...
Marty Harrison
MP 208.1 on the UP's Sedalia Sub
livesteamer
 
Posts: 219
Joined: Thu Mar 11, 2004 7:58 pm
Location: Knob Noster, MO

Re: CONSTANT EVOLUTION: THE HISTORY OF BOSTON’S SOUTH STATIO

Postby 3rdrail » Tue Mar 12, 2013 8:59 pm

The place to be if you were into American Flyer or Lionel was "Morgies" (Morgan Memorial) at Chandler/E.Berkeley. Up until @1970, Morgies didn't know about the durability and value of O scale. Heavy duty switches- 25 cents, straight/032 track- 15 cents for a bundle, original prewar diecast locomotives with tender- $3 !!! Locomotives, Motors. I've built four large O scale hi-rail layouts, each replacing the last. Each time I use and reuse my Morgies track. I've never had a problem with any of it, and it gets more realistic each year that passes with a nice brown tarnish with shiny rail head due to car's wheels. Transformers, freight/passenger cars, you name it, all at a bargain !
~Paul Joyce~
[i]Moderator: Toy Trains, Model Railroading, Outdoor and Live Steam

Paul Joyce passed away in August, 2013. We honor his memory and his devotion at railroad.net.
User avatar
3rdrail
 
Posts: 5641
Joined: Thu Jun 29, 2006 11:10 pm
Location: Boston

Re: CONSTANT EVOLUTION: THE HISTORY OF BOSTON’S SOUTH STATIO

Postby Charliemta » Tue Mar 12, 2013 10:41 pm

When I was a kid back in the 1950's, there was a really cool model railroad shop in the downtown shopping district (Downtown Crossing), near Boston Common. I can't remember the name or where exactly it was.
Long live the "El"
User avatar
Charliemta
 
Posts: 317
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2004 7:51 pm

Re: CONSTANT EVOLUTION: THE HISTORY OF BOSTON’S SOUTH STATIO

Postby 3rdrail » Tue Mar 12, 2013 11:35 pm

Eric Fuch's on Tremont nr School
~Paul Joyce~
[i]Moderator: Toy Trains, Model Railroading, Outdoor and Live Steam

Paul Joyce passed away in August, 2013. We honor his memory and his devotion at railroad.net.
User avatar
3rdrail
 
Posts: 5641
Joined: Thu Jun 29, 2006 11:10 pm
Location: Boston

Re: CONSTANT EVOLUTION: THE HISTORY OF BOSTON’S SOUTH STATIO

Postby djlong » Wed Mar 13, 2013 7:25 am

I never got to see those places. The only place in Boston that I remember was inthe 1970s and a place called "Trasporama" just outside one of the Park Street entrances. Had a HUGE O-Gauge layout that I spent many hours looking at in exchange for my (IIRC $3) admisison. Didn't last very long.
djlong
 
Posts: 684
Joined: Wed Jan 05, 2005 10:29 am

Re: CONSTANT EVOLUTION: THE HISTORY OF BOSTON’S SOUTH STATIO

Postby highgreen215 » Wed Mar 13, 2013 12:34 pm

A great picture, never seen another of the wooden escalators. The sound of the wooden escalators was: "glug-glug-glug". Filene's in Boston had four of them, two up and two down. Would love to have a rubbing or copy of that Otis emblem.
highgreen215
 
Posts: 412
Joined: Wed Oct 03, 2012 11:43 pm
Location: Roslindale, Mass.

Re: CONSTANT EVOLUTION: THE HISTORY OF BOSTON’S SOUTH STATIO

Postby jonnhrr » Wed Mar 13, 2013 7:45 pm

I remember that Forest Hills escalator, rode it every day on the way home from school.

Besides Eric Fuchs (where I used to hang out and make a pest of myself there as a kid) wasn't there a Hobbytown hobby shop near Tremont and Boylston, I think that is where I bought a Hobbytown HO E-7 Diesel kit that weighed about 10 pounds I think. Could pull a lot of cars.

Jon
Avatar Photo - P&W local from Gardner to Worcester at Morgan Rd., Hubbardston
User avatar
jonnhrr
 
Posts: 1031
Joined: Sun May 30, 2004 5:58 pm
Location: Sabattus ME USA

Re: CONSTANT EVOLUTION: THE HISTORY OF BOSTON’S SOUTH STATIO

Postby 3rdrail » Thu Mar 14, 2013 7:03 am

highgreen215 wrote:A great picture, never seen another of the wooden escalators. The sound of the wooden escalators was: "glug-glug-glug". Filene's in Boston had four of them, two up and two down. Would love to have a rubbing or copy of that Otis emblem.
You probably could have had it gratis when the construction guys were tearing it down. All that stuff was getting loaded into dumpsters and dump trucks. Thanks for the complement regarding the photo. Here's the bottom view-
http://photos.nerail.org/showpic/?20060 ... r&BOOL=ALL

jonnhrr wrote: I remember that Forest Hills escalator, rode it every day on the way home from school.

Besides Eric Fuchs (where I used to hang out and make a pest of myself there as a kid) wasn't there a Hobbytown hobby shop near Tremont and Boylston, I think that is where I bought a Hobbytown HO E-7 Diesel kit that weighed about 10 pounds I think. Could pull a lot of cars.
You probably remember a good friend of mine there, Jack who was always enthusiastic about giving you info about an item. Jack's not into retail anymore but he's doing well. I'll tell him that you remembered their operation. The other one on the south side of Boylston between Wash and Tremont was "Hobbytown" which did have trains but wasn't quite as railway oriented as Eric Fuch's was. Do you remember the rotating display of Japanese brass trolley and intwerurban models behind the large case at Fuchs ? For me, Fuchs was the annual destination to pick out my Christmas present, most of which I still have. I have a nice O-scale "Yankee Flyer" that had electrical pick-up problems due to wobbly rollers. Jack took them home and re-installed a new set- not quite original, but Lionel authorized as Jack is Lionel trained and backed.
~Paul Joyce~
[i]Moderator: Toy Trains, Model Railroading, Outdoor and Live Steam

Paul Joyce passed away in August, 2013. We honor his memory and his devotion at railroad.net.
User avatar
3rdrail
 
Posts: 5641
Joined: Thu Jun 29, 2006 11:10 pm
Location: Boston

Re: CONSTANT EVOLUTION: THE HISTORY OF BOSTON’S SOUTH STATIO

Postby Robert Paniagua » Thu Mar 14, 2013 6:20 pm

Head-end View wrote:Well, while they're at it maybe they will enlarge the food court to include a real ice cream stand like Baskin-Robbins or Haagen-Dazs, something South Station sadly lacks. There's really no place like New York!


Or better yet, like Washington's Union Station with all the food shops and retail shops, that's how Boston South Station should be like!
~Robert Paniagua
Moderator: WMATA :: General Railroad Operations
User avatar
Robert Paniagua
 
Posts: 4418
Joined: Fri Mar 12, 2004 6:11 am
Location: Weymouth, MA 02188

Re: CONSTANT EVOLUTION: THE HISTORY OF BOSTON’S SOUTH STATIO

Postby 3rdrail » Thu Mar 14, 2013 11:45 pm

Nah, it shouldn't be a tourist trap. It should go back to the era of affording the traveller creature comfort. A great bar like like North Station's "Iron Horse". Perhaps a non-denominational chapel like the Our Lady of the Railways that was at South Station previously, a book/magazine/news stand, a cafeteria style excellent restaurant which was a great value for the buck...stuff like that.
~Paul Joyce~
[i]Moderator: Toy Trains, Model Railroading, Outdoor and Live Steam

Paul Joyce passed away in August, 2013. We honor his memory and his devotion at railroad.net.
User avatar
3rdrail
 
Posts: 5641
Joined: Thu Jun 29, 2006 11:10 pm
Location: Boston

PreviousNext

Return to Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA)

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google Feedfetcher, rmccown and 5 guests