Signal calling "Automatic Clear"

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Signal calling "Automatic Clear"

Postby waterlevelroute » Sat Feb 26, 2011 3:42 pm

Hi;
Would someone kindly clue me into what they mean when they call out "automatic clear"? There are a couple of signals (cp 92 and 94)that get that call out.
Thanks a bunch.
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Re: Signal calling "Automatic Clear"

Postby charlie6017 » Sat Feb 26, 2011 9:42 pm

Hello,

All CSX crews have to call out the indications at signals........in this case, it's an automatic signal--which i would believe that it's not at an interlocking where there is no home signal. "Clear" is simply a clear--or green signal. Hope this helps!

Charlie
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Re: Signal calling "Automatic Clear"

Postby FarmallBob » Sun Feb 27, 2011 9:19 pm

At automatic signals I generally hear "automatic" followed by the signal number, track number (if multiple tracks), train direction and signal indication. Example: "automatic 378 track 2 west - clear".

OTOH interlocking ("absolute") signals are called by CP and number, then track, direction and indication. Ex: "CP 380 track 2 west - clear"

Incidentally depending on track occupancy or the route lined ahead, indications besides "clear" may be called at automatic signals. Most common is "approach" but occasionally also "stop" will be heard.
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Re: Signal calling "Automatic Clear"

Postby Erie-Lackawanna » Tue Mar 01, 2011 8:20 pm

"Stop" would only be called at an interlocking, since non-interlocked, automatic block signals generally have as their most restrictive aspect "Restricting Proceed" (used to be "Stop and Proceed").

Interestingly, in the past, the official name for an absolute stop was "Stop Signal", and that's what you had to say when you called out the signal. This was to prevent confusion and to make it clear that you were simply calling out the indication of the signal governing movement of your train, not telling the engineer to stop the train because of some other reason. I guess CSX doesn't think the distinction is important anymore.

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Re: Signal calling "Automatic Clear"

Postby CSX Conductor » Tue Mar 01, 2011 8:29 pm

Erie-Lackawanna wrote:"Stop" would only be called at an interlocking, since non-interlocked, automatic block signals generally have as their most restrictive aspect "Restricting Proceed" (used to be "Stop and Proceed"). Actually, i believe it's named Restricted Proceed.

Stop signals at home signals have to be called out over the radio and every fifteen minutes while stopped at said Stop Signal.

Just more waste of the radio. CSX always preaches safety, but calling signals is quite the opposite when crews are calling signals and stepping on other transmission such as switching.

Interestingly, in the past, the official name for an absolute stop was "Stop Signal", and that's what you had to say when you called out the signal. This was to prevent confusion and to make it clear that you were simply calling out the indication of the signal governing movement of your train, not telling the engineer to stop the train because of some other reason. I guess CSX doesn't think the distinction is important anymore.

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Re: Signal calling "Automatic Clear"

Postby ohioriverrailway » Wed May 11, 2011 7:16 pm

Speaking of signals, what the heck is a red over amber over flashing green? I saw one of those just west of Cumberland.
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Re: Signal calling "Automatic Clear"

Postby strench707 » Wed May 11, 2011 7:27 pm

Medium Approach Medium. Basically you are taking a switch at Medium speed and then its saying the next signal is also going to be a medium move so it says approach medium. All together you get a Medium Approach Medium. If that bottom green was solid, not flashing that would be a Medium Approach Slow aspect = medium speed through switches, approach next signal at slow speed.

Hope that helps!

Davis
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Re: Signal calling "Automatic Clear"

Postby ohioriverrailway » Fri May 13, 2011 10:10 am

OK, clears that up. Thanks for the information.
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Re: Signal calling "Automatic Clear"

Postby n01jd1 » Tue May 17, 2011 3:45 pm

ohioriverrailway wrote:Speaking of signals, what the heck is a red over amber over flashing green? I saw one of those just west of Cumberland.


As another poster said, that is a medium approach medium. CSX has slightly different signal rules for both the former Chessie and Seaboard territories. A medium approach medium (red over yellow over green) on Norac based systems is a medium approach slow down south.
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Re: Signal calling "Automatic Clear"

Postby mmi16 » Tue Jul 14, 2015 12:04 pm

FarmallBob wrote:At automatic signals I generally hear "automatic" followed by the signal number, track number (if multiple tracks), train direction and signal indication. Example: "automatic 378 track 2 west - clear".

OTOH interlocking ("absolute") signals are called by CP and number, then track, direction and indication. Ex: "CP 380 track 2 west - clear"

Incidentally depending on track occupancy or the route lined ahead, indications besides "clear" may be called at automatic signals. Most common is "approach" but occasionally also "stop" will be heard.

Different territories have different ways of referring to intermediate (automatic) signals. On some territories the signal number (which also correlates to a milepost) will be called, on other territories custom has give each intermediate a specific name 'Wide water', County Line' etc. etc. all in concert with the local landmarks on the territory.
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