Schools offering Railroad Skills Training Courses

General discussion about working in the railroad industry. Industry employers are welcome to post openings here.

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Re: Railroad and Dating

Postby gp80mac » Sat Jul 10, 2010 1:00 pm

I meant 9-5 jobs that are not on the railroad. Isn't exactly a job hunter's paradise lately. And good luck finding anything with decent benefits and good pay anymore. Still one factor the RR has on their side - and they know it.

The point being - having a 2 yr degree is not going to hurt your chances of a RR job.
Yep.....
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Re: Schools offering Railroad Skills Training Courses

Postby hamdizle » Fri Jul 16, 2010 4:55 pm

I don't think going to choo choo u does any good...nor do I think that having a 2 or 4 yr degree makes any difference in getting hired for train crew....If the company u applied with wants u it's not cause of some diploma...I don't have no fancy degree and neither did 13 of the 15 people who got hired with me in new hire... The rail road looks for certain types of people...and apparently I fell into that group....the people that were hired that took a railroad class had to take all the same tests and do all the same crap as everyone else...so whats the point? No class can substitute hands on experience. And that's what matters....boo-ya
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Dakota County Technical College

Postby freightfan » Sun Jul 18, 2010 9:37 pm

Has anyone here attended their freight conductor course or know of anyone that has (or heard anything about this)?

It's 7 weeks, $4,800. I know CP asks if you've taken this program.

Here's their link: http://www.dctc.edu/future-students/pro ... nology.cfm
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Re: Dakota County Technical College

Postby hamdizle » Wed Jul 21, 2010 4:05 pm

freightfan wrote:Has anyone here attended their freight conductor course or know of anyone that has (or heard anything about this)?

It's 7 weeks, $4,800. I know CP asks if you've taken this program.

Here's their link: http://www.dctc.edu/future-students/pro ... nology.cfm

Don't even bother.....A couple guys that I hired out with took that course.....And in the end they had to do all the same crap as we did that they teach u in new hire class....so don't waste you're $. And when you're hired by a railroad in the twincities thats where they send u...Of course the railroad has their own instructors they use not the colleges...
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MODOC RR Academy

Postby BNSF-Conductor » Fri Oct 01, 2010 8:38 pm

Any one here been there? reviews? stories? A good friend of mine says he is going to go there for conductor training, I keep telling him he should just keep applying and I even gave him a copy of the resume I used to get hired so he has a template. I probably would have gone myself had I not been hired. It's his money I'm just hoping someone has some insight that I might be able to share with him!!! (I told him he should work for NS lol)
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Re: MODOC RR Academy

Postby Gadfly » Sun Oct 03, 2010 9:12 am

I it may be irrelevant, but IMHO, these "railroad U" schools are for the birds. I had never heard of such a thing until I started reading here. The idea that someone will PAY thousands of $$ to hold a job the company will train him for is just absurd. Save yer money! I don't think it gives you any edge. Every job I ever held or bid in on NS, the company trained me for and gave me so many weeks to "qualify" on it! They even have their own little "railroad boot camp"! :-D


GF
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Re: MODOC RR Academy

Postby matawanaberdeen » Sun Oct 03, 2010 11:24 am

Gadfly wrote:I it may be irrelevant, but IMHO, these "railroad U" schools are for the birds. I had never heard of such a thing until I started reading here. The idea that someone will PAY thousands of $$ to hold a job the company will train him for is just absurd. Save yer money! I don't think it gives you any edge. Every job I ever held or bid in on NS, the company trained me for and gave me so many weeks to "qualify" on it! They even have their own little "railroad boot camp"! :-D


GF

ditto
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Re: MODOC RR Academy

Postby freightfan » Mon Nov 01, 2010 10:17 am

Re: RR schools in general, if you have things going against hiring you (from the RR's point-of-view), then it's probably a good idea to pursue them. It will give you a jump on the other employees if you get hired. Most classes have lots of tests, as will the roads. I have also noticed that UP has now added a question "Have you ever attended a railroad school?" (or something like that) to their job criteria. Probably not a kick-out question, but I'm sure it puts you in a pile that will be examined before the others. If you've attended and passed one of these classes, it should give your furture employer confidence that you will also pass the exams in their class. Plus, they may shorten your training period. BNSF (with NARS) and CP (with DCTC) also ask if you've attending such classes.
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Re: Schools offering Railroad Skills Training Courses

Postby Trainguy73 » Sat Mar 12, 2011 12:25 pm

The RR Conductor program at Dakota County Technical College was started at the request and support of the Union Pacific and Canadian Pacific RRs. The curriculum was developed by UP & CP training managers. The instructors are retired conductors & engineers. The course includes hands-on activities practiced at the on-campus railyard. It is true that you will be required to participate in company training when you're hired but, you will be more comfortable and confident. The RR recruiters give extra consideration to DCTC grads. Some RRs shorten the training period for DCTC grads or use them as tutors for the slower learners.
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Re: Schools offering Railroad Skills Training Courses

Postby csxteeter » Mon Apr 25, 2011 8:42 pm

So does CSX.
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Re: Railroad and Dating

Postby SeaSalt » Thu Mar 08, 2012 5:37 pm

gp80mac wrote:I meant 9-5 jobs that are not on the railroad. Isn't exactly a job hunter's paradise lately. And good luck finding anything with decent benefits and good pay anymore. Still one factor the RR has on their side - and they know it.

The point being - having a 2 yr degree is not going to hurt your chances of a RR job.


The US Merchant Marine pays very well and you do not need a degree. It is not a 9-5 job either!
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Re: Railroad and Dating

Postby supernova1972 » Sun Mar 11, 2012 1:43 pm

dmandavid wrote:Im just trying to earn a 2 year degree. That way atleast I have a greater chance of getting selected for testing and interviewed over the guys who have high school degrees. Way things are now im thinking taking a conductor class. I put an few apps into BNSF and NS, they never called me in for testing most likey since the way things are they want experiance guys.


Sorry bro but a degree is only gonna get you a leg up in outside hire management. Two years of outdoor work or being on call is much better looking to most railroads. You don't need a degree for this job, they train you you how they want to train you and most don't like previous training or conductors from other RRs. Chances are they didn't call you because you don't have the work experience they want. I would say 95% of the guys I went down to REDI and hired out with were from manual trades, farming, construction, manual labor, mechanics, I was a plumber and HVAC tech. Same with with a buddy who went to an NS open hiring session. They didn't give a * about his degree but where very interested in his on call experiance working on HVAC units.

I'd be willing to bet my pay for a half that if you could talk to a hire up who wouldn't lie they would tell you you'd have a better chance if you quit college and worked outside all year for a year and then applied.
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Re: Railroad and Dating

Postby SeaSalt » Sat Mar 17, 2012 8:38 pm

supernova1972 wrote:
dmandavid wrote:Im just trying to earn a 2 year degree. That way atleast I have a greater chance of getting selected for testing and interviewed over the guys who have high school degrees. Way things are now im thinking taking a conductor class. I put an few apps into BNSF and NS, they never called me in for testing most likey since the way things are they want experiance guys.


Sorry bro but a degree is only gonna get you a leg up in outside hire management. Two years of outdoor work or being on call is much better looking to most railroads. You don't need a degree for this job, they train you you how they want to train you and most don't like previous training or conductors from other RRs. Chances are they didn't call you because you don't have the work experience they want. I would say 95% of the guys I went down to REDI and hired out with were from manual trades, farming, construction, manual labor, mechanics, I was a plumber and HVAC tech. Same with with a buddy who went to an NS open hiring session. They didn't give a * about his degree but where very interested in his on call experiance working on HVAC units.

I'd be willing to bet my pay for a half that if you could talk to a hire up who wouldn't lie they would tell you you'd have a better chance if you quit college and worked outside all year for a year and then applied.


Sounds about right to me. I figure with a Class A CDL, formal training in mechanical crafts working with LP/HP boilers, diesel engines/Gen Sets, piping/pumps/valves, HVAC etc and I have worked for years in a transportation field where I pull 12 hours days, 7 days a week, for months on end and work all hours in all weather conditions, I should be able to get a job offer from a railroad... Just gotta decide on a class 1 or a shortline... And if and when I get outta my current line of work... And if I think I would prefer to work in the mechanical side in a shop or in train crew service...
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Re:

Postby jkell1234 » Mon Sep 28, 2015 8:59 am

Guest wrote:Get a job on the NS, they send you to school for free and pay you the whole time. They even pay your travel and meals while you're at school. Can't beat that deal.

-r


The problem with this scenario is getting a job. Its next to impossible if you don't seem to know people that know the right people.
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Re: Re:

Postby slchub » Thu Nov 12, 2015 5:28 pm

jkell1234 wrote:
Guest wrote:Get a job on the NS, they send you to school for free and pay you the whole time. They even pay your travel and meals while you're at school. Can't beat that deal.

-r


The problem with this scenario is getting a job. Its next to impossible if you don't seem to know people that know the right people.


That is not always the case. I applied for the Union Pacific while I lived in Atlanta. I was given the opportunity to hire on with them in Salt Lake City. I knew nobody in Salt Lake City nor anyone who worked for the UP. A few years later I decided that nationwide seniority sounded good to me so I applied with Amtrak not knowing anybody and was given the opportunity to come on-board as well.
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