NJT engineer looking to move south

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NJT engineer looking to move south

Postby njtengr74 » Wed Mar 11, 2009 9:38 pm

Im currently a locomotive engineer for new jersey transit, I contacted tri-rail about transfer or other employment. They simply shrugged me off and said there is no jobs at all....Any truth to this??? help a fellow enrg out....thanks for any posts
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Re: engineer looking to move south

Postby Noel Weaver » Wed Mar 11, 2009 11:39 pm

Tri-Rail does not employe the engineers and conductors but this is farmed out to a contractor. Their pay is nowhere near
what NJT pays and the operating crews are not even under Railroad Retirement. It is not a place that I would want to work
if I had already paid into the Railroad Retirement fund. The crews here are under the same "goldfish bowl" that they are
everywhere else.
I don't think they are hiring at present and unless there is an expansion in service in the future, I do not think the future is
too bright either.
My advice to you is to STAY PUT.
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Re: engineer looking to move south

Postby njtengr74 » Wed Mar 11, 2009 11:47 pm

thank you for the post reply....how about amtrak????any other rail companies you might know of worth a look at?? Thank you for your time.
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Re: engineer looking to move south

Postby Jtgshu » Thu Mar 12, 2009 11:54 pm

njtengr74 wrote:thank you for the post reply....how about amtrak????any other rail companies you might know of worth a look at?? Thank you for your time.


Whooohooo!!! Move up!!! :) hahahaha Just kidding njtengr74 - well not really :)
On the RR, "believe nothing you hear and only half of what you see"
John, aka "JTGSHU" passed away on August 26, 2013. We honor his memory and his devotion to railroading at railroad.net.
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Re: engineer looking to move south

Postby slchub » Fri Mar 13, 2009 9:26 am

Go to the Amtrak website and look for the jobs down south. You just missed a great opportunity within the past few years to basically slide on over to Amtrak without having to place a lot of time in the training seat as a re-entry engineer. Now you'll spend 8 weeks in Delaware and do your time to satisfy the federal requirements for a student engineer.

I made the move to Amtrak from the Union Pacific without a bat of the eye and have not looked back since. I have visited all three crew bases in Florida (Jacksonville, Sanford and Miami) and am looking forward to transferring down there when the economy improves.

I've looked at the other railroads (not many in Florida other than Amtrak, CSX and NS) and most do not contribute to RRB and have an average pay of $14-15 an hour for the hogger (all short lines).
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Re: engineer looking to move south

Postby njtengr74 » Fri Mar 13, 2009 9:51 pm

looks like im staying up north....at least for now. thank you all for the advice.
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Re: NJT engineer looking to move south

Postby keithsy » Tue Mar 24, 2009 6:12 pm

Stay where you are. You are building union seniority and you have union rights. The south is right-to-work. The living might be sweet, but you have it good for your $$$ future. I would never work below the Mason-Dixon Line.
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Re: NJT engineer looking to move south

Postby amtrakhogger » Tue Mar 24, 2009 7:41 pm

I believe Herzog is the contractor for Tri-Rail.
"I will stop at St. Avold."
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Re: NJT engineer looking to move south

Postby jz441 » Wed Mar 25, 2009 12:27 am

Tri-Rail is now operated by Veolia (Connex), who operates MBCR in Boston and Metrolink in LA area... They are also UTU represented property.
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Re: NJT engineer looking to move south

Postby blabey » Thu Mar 26, 2009 8:12 am

I'd like to correct some misinformation in a previous post. Any T&E employee working for a common carrier shortline or regional railroad IS covered by the RRA. The Act applies to every Class 2 or Class 3 railroad in the USA. It does not, however, apply to crews working in industrial switching operations that are not common carriers or to trolley or light rail transit operations.
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Re: NJT engineer looking to move south

Postby Noel Weaver » Tue Apr 07, 2009 9:08 pm

blabey wrote:I'd like to correct some misinformation in a previous post. Any T&E employee working for a common carrier shortline or regional railroad IS covered by the RRA. The Act applies to every Class 2 or Class 3 railroad in the USA. It does not, however, apply to crews working in industrial switching operations that are not common carriers or to trolley or light rail transit operations.


You are not correcting anything, I know people who have worked for them. The crews are employed by a contractor and not
by a railroad thus they are not part of the Railroad Retirement Act.
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Re: NJT engineer looking to move south

Postby jz441 » Wed Apr 08, 2009 12:30 am

Mr. Weaver is correct!
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Re: NJT engineer looking to move south

Postby slchub » Wed Apr 08, 2009 2:26 pm

Noel Weaver wrote:
blabey wrote:I'd like to correct some misinformation in a previous post. Any T&E employee working for a common carrier shortline or regional railroad IS covered by the RRA. The Act applies to every Class 2 or Class 3 railroad in the USA. It does not, however, apply to crews working in industrial switching operations that are not common carriers or to trolley or light rail transit operations.


You are not correcting anything, I know people who have worked for them. The crews are employed by a contractor and not
by a railroad thus they are not part of the Railroad Retirement Act.
Noel Weaver
You can call the RRB and ask the rep if the RR you are interested in working for contributes to RRB. Many short lines do not. And there are some Class 2 & 3's which do not. Believe me, I've talked to several RR's in the SE US who do not contribute and pay their hoggers $13-16 an hour.
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Re: NJT engineer looking to move south

Postby Noel Weaver » Wed Apr 08, 2009 9:22 pm

slchub wrote:
Noel Weaver wrote:
blabey wrote:I'd like to correct some misinformation in a previous post. Any T&E employee working for a common carrier shortline or regional railroad IS covered by the RRA. The Act applies to every Class 2 or Class 3 railroad in the USA. It does not, however, apply to crews working in industrial switching operations that are not common carriers or to trolley or light rail transit operations.


You are not correcting anything, I know people who have worked for them. The crews are employed by a contractor and not
by a railroad thus they are not part of the Railroad Retirement Act.
Noel Weaver
You can call the RRB and ask the rep if the RR you are interested in working for contributes to RRB. Many short lines do not. And there are some Class 2 & 3's which do not. Believe me, I've talked to several RR's in the SE US who do not contribute and pay their hoggers $13-16 an hour.


When you retire from the railroad and collect your Railroad Retirement, you can't work for any railroad or union with pay or
you lose your retirement benefits for that period. I was told I could work for Tri-Rail by a good friend with connections at
that time but I said if I still wanted to run trains, I would have stayed in New York State and continue to work for Conrail.
Being that the Tri-Rail people are not covered by Railroad Retirement, a retired railroader collecting a RR pension can still
work for the contractor operating Tri-Rail trains without a loss of their railroad pension. Thanks but NO THANKS.
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Re: NJT engineer looking to move south

Postby blabey » Fri Apr 10, 2009 1:19 pm

Before you accept hearsay or rumors as "fact" when it comes to who may or may not be covered by the Railroad Retirement Act, you may want to check with the Railroad Retirement Board itself - or look up the Railroad Retirement Act of 1935. Frankly, if you're told that a particular Class 2 or Class 3 railroad does not provide RRA coverage for its employees, that company is violating Federal statutes (unlikely, since the penalties are severe) - or (more likely), the person who gave you the information is misinformed.

Let me quote from the Act -- 45 U.S.C. 231(a), parts i and ii:

The term "employer" shall include :

i. any express company, sleeping car company and carrier by railroad subject to the Interstate Commerce Act.

ii. any company which is directly or indirectly owned by, or under common control with one or more employers as defined in paragraph i of this subdivision, and which operates any equipment or facility or performs any service (except trucking service...) in connection with transportation of passengers or property by railroad.

Those provisions give the Railroad Retirement Board very broad jurisdiction. As I said in my earlier post, the Railroad Retirement Act mandates that employees of ALL common carrier railroads participate in the Railroad Retirement System rather than the Social Security System. By the way, when the term "common carrier" is used, I mean any railroad company handling freight in interstate commerce that is subject to the jurisdiction of the Surface Transportation Board (STB). (The language from the 1935 RRA Act refers to the Interstate Commerce Commission and the STB is the successor regulatory body for the industry.)

Switching operations (contract or otherwise) located inside an industrial facility are not common carriers, since they are not subject to the STB. Most museum or Disneyland-type operations aren't under the STB either, nor are light rail systems like the SF Muni, transit and subway lines like BART or the DC Metro, or a handful of intrastate-only industrial lines (Connecticut's Brantford Steam RR, the narrow gauge line operated by US Gypsum at Plaster City, CA and the Erie Mining RR come to mind.)

Other than the exceptions mentioned, you have a common carrier railroad --- and if it's such a railroad, employees are covered by Railroad Retirement.
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