Why work for MBTA?

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Why work for MBTA?

Postby AznSumtinSumtin » Sun Jan 14, 2007 7:27 am

Why do some people work for the MBTA if they are not railfans or transitfans? Also, would you work for the MBTA? Provide 3 reasons to support your answer. Please answer in a 5 paragraph essay using the topic-3 bodies-conclusion format. This counts as 10% of your grade for the semester.
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Postby redline43 » Sun Jan 14, 2007 11:14 am

I remember hearing somewhere that MBTA workers get paid surprisingly well -- does anyone know salaries fro various MBTA jobs?
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Re: Why work for MBTA?

Postby F-line to Dudley via Park » Sun Jan 14, 2007 11:34 am

AznSumtinSumtin wrote:Why do some people work for the MBTA if they are not railfans or transitfans? Also, would you work for the MBTA? Provide 3 reasons to support your answer. Please answer in a 5 paragraph essay using the topic-3 bodies-conclusion format. This counts as 10% of your grade for the semester.


Well-paid, good benefits, good job security. The Carmen's Union is really good at bringing home the bacon for its workers.
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Postby Leo Sullivan » Sun Jan 14, 2007 12:02 pm

First, from personal experience (I work with but not for the T) being interested in it as a job is even better than railfanning but, being a railfan doesn't hurt. The operating people are usually professional and some inspectors are awesomely so. The job is interesting and challenging.
Dealing with the public is usually interesting and pleasant though the exceptions can be frustrating. Relatively the pay isn't what it used to be
but, if you aren't a ceo no one's is. It's a good job, the work is challenging, the hours can be horrible but there's plenty of camradarie and satisfaction.
And, don't forget, todays part time driver might retire as general manager.
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Postby DutchRailnut » Sun Jan 14, 2007 12:35 pm

Plenty of people work at McDonalds but can't stand hamburgers.
If Conductors are in charge, why are they promoted to be Engineer???

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Postby McTed » Sun Jan 14, 2007 12:36 pm

Most people who work for the MBTA are not what you might call railfans. They may become fans overtime but the problem with that way of thinking is it’s a bit like working a chocolate factory you see so much of it you get sick of it. The last thing you want to do during your free time is talk about trains. My sense however is that most of the railfans that work for the MBTA were or at least had some railfanning interest prior to becoming employed by the MBTA.

The pay rates vary for job to job union to union and in some cases people are well paid while others consider themselves under paid for the responsibility they handle at the MBTA.

The pay however is only the tip of the iceberg the benefits package practically the retirement plan is the ultimate prize and goal of any long term employee of the MBTA.

As like many companies theses days the Health benefits have several options and depend on you own personnel and family concerns determines the choice. The dental is pretty much the same for all and although from first glimpse the plan is decent, the plan could use a little enhancement.
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Postby redline43 » Mon Jan 15, 2007 12:19 am

Plenty of people work at McDonalds but can't stand hamburgers.


Yes, but a position at McDonalds needs virtually no qualifications. I can imagine that it takes quite a bit of training to operate a subway train carrying over 100 people.
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Postby GP40MC 1116 » Mon Jan 15, 2007 1:41 am

T think this is a great topic, and is related to the MBTA, but it might be better under the General Discussion Employment Thread located here and more discussion wouild start over their as well, I am sure our moderator will agree as well

http://www.railroad.net/forums/viewforu ... 0eec002a34
Last edited by GP40MC 1116 on Mon Jan 15, 2007 1:43 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby bbfen » Mon Jan 15, 2007 1:42 am

I know a gentleman who took a job with the T because his former employer (a contractor of ours) wasn't offering anything in the way of health benefits, they had poor hours, no support from mgmt and was paid a third of what they charged off to us.

I see him from time to time, and while he's not a "fan, fan" he enjoys his work enough and can support his family. He's earning a living, and doesn't hate it. For a lotta folks, I think that's a goal.
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Postby DutchRailnut » Mon Jan 15, 2007 8:45 am

redline43 wrote:
Plenty of people work at McDonalds but can't stand hamburgers.


Yes, but a position at McDonalds needs virtually no qualifications. I can imagine that it takes quite a bit of training to operate a subway train carrying over 100 people.


So your saying railfans bring experience ???? believe me I train engineers and opposite is proven every time I get a railfan.
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Postby redline43 » Mon Jan 15, 2007 10:00 am

So your saying railfans bring experience ???? believe me I train engineers and opposite is proven every time I get a railfan.


No, railfans do not bring experience, but the bring interest in wanting to be trained. Why would someone who was not a railfan want to take all of this training?
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Postby jg greenwood » Mon Jan 15, 2007 10:46 am

redline43 wrote:
So your saying railfans bring experience ???? believe me I train engineers and opposite is proven every time I get a railfan.


No, railfans do not bring experience, but the bring interest in wanting to be trained. Why would someone who was not a railfan want to take all of this training?


Mr. Redline43,
The problem is, railfans all too often let their vast knowledge of basically useless minutiae supercede their ability/desire to learn. They often fail to realize what is important, and more importantly, what isn't. Why would someone that's not a railfan subject themselves to this training? Can you say $, benefits, secure employment? Mr. DutchMan is correct, railfans are often the worst railroaders. Sad but true................
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Postby RailBus63 » Mon Jan 15, 2007 9:08 pm

redline43 wrote:No, railfans do not bring experience, but the bring interest in wanting to be trained. Why would someone who was not a railfan want to take all of this training?


They 'take' all the training because it is required to hold a good-paying job. Most similar blue-collar occupations require training to do the job, and more importantly to stay safe in environments where mistakes or inattention can lead to injury or even death.
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Postby CRail » Tue Jan 16, 2007 7:00 am

jg greenwood wrote:Mr. DutchMan is correct, railfans are often the worst railroaders. Sad but true................


Let's not generalize too much, I know a good number of fans who work for the T and the Commuter rail who are highly valued employees, who know their job, and do it well. There are also a lot of people at the trolley museum who do magnificant work. There are many railfans who are either know-it-all's or they get too over-excited at the sight of a train, both of these are dangerous. Those of us who have an interest rather than an obssesion are often better to have on board.

I feel that in learning this I have calmed down a lot and become more willing to keep my mouth shut and listen to superiors, something I have not always been good at. Just about any railfan could be a good employee if they know the difference between play time and when its time to buckle down.
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Postby djlong » Tue Jan 16, 2007 12:46 pm

I can tell you from personal experience that it does NOT take a lot of training to operate a subway train. In fact, it was more of an effort for me to learn how to drive a CAR when I was 15 than when I had the opportunity to operate a subway train when I was 14. (Yes, it was in revenue service, mid-day on a Saturday and, no, I'm not giving away the name of the person who made this possible and I'll only go as far as saying that half the route I operated the train on - one run only - no longer exists)

What DOES take a lot of training is what to do in an emergency - being able to handle anything from a derailment to a passenger having a heart attack.
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