Is this switch seen on railroads ?

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Is this switch seen on railroads ?

Postby 3rdrail » Fri Jan 18, 2008 11:49 pm

Hi All.
Do railroads ever use the type of turnout (switch) which instead of a movable outside curve rail point, as generally found, uses a moveable inside curve rail point which guides the back of the wheel flange into the curve, as found on trolley and interurban lines ?
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Postby FarmallBob » Tue Jan 22, 2008 3:52 pm

Paul - While not a common carrier railroad, the Kodak Park Railroad has several dozen odd single point(?) switches like you describe scattered throughout it’s system.

FYI the KPRR is Kodak's Rochester NY manufacturing facility’s 3-1/2 mile internal railway system. They handle 10 – 20+ cars daily with their own SW1000 and MP15 locomotives. So I submit then the answer to your question would be “yes”.

...FB
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Postby pennsy » Tue Jan 22, 2008 4:19 pm

Sounds right. Orange Empire RR Museum, Perris, California has them on their track as well, but used on its streetcar line, especially to get in and out of the carbarns. Not used for any speed, and they are hand thrown.
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Postby 3rdrail » Tue Jan 22, 2008 4:37 pm

Thanks, guys. So I suppose the answer would be "yes" at some low-speed facilities.
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Postby LCJ » Tue Jan 22, 2008 4:49 pm

The last one I saw was on the now abandoned Tivoli Hollow track street railroad section in North Albany NY.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tivoli_Hollow_Railroad
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Postby FarmallBob » Tue Jan 22, 2008 6:28 pm

3rdrail wrote:Thanks, guys. So I suppose the answer would be "yes" at some low-speed facilities.

Paul - "Low speed facility" would certainly describe the KPRR. 6 or 7 mph is about as fast as I've ever seen 'em go!

And yes - all those KPRR single point switches are hand-thrown.

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Postby LCJ » Fri Jan 25, 2008 4:19 pm

Is this what your talking about?

Image
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Postby 3rdrail » Fri Jan 25, 2008 6:10 pm

Boy, that's a neat one. That one is a modified version of what I am talking about, in that on that one, you've got two moving points - one for inside the wheel flange and one for outside. I think that I may have a photo of what I'm talking about somewhere. Let me look for it after supper, and if I find it I'll post it, ok ? Where is that one from ? I've never seen one like that. Thanks.
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Postby pennsy » Fri Jan 25, 2008 8:04 pm

Hi Paul,

I agree with you, it is very unusual. Both points move. What impressed me is how LIGHT that rail is. It looks too light for a trolley car. This might be for some mine etc. That has to be the lightest rail switch I have ever seen.
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Postby FarmallBob » Fri Jan 25, 2008 8:22 pm

LCJ wrote:Is this what your talking about?

LCJ - That looks like a "plate switch".

A plate switch requires double-flanged wheels (wheels flanged on both sides) in order to work. Wheels passing through the switch actually leave the stock rails and roll on their flanges across the flat plates forming the base of the switch. The wheels then roll back onto their treads on the stock rails as they leave the switch.

They're only used to switch very light, hand-pushed operations like small mine cars and industrial oven cars.

----

I wish I had a photo of a Kodak Park RR single point switch. A quick look and you can easily understand how it works by guiding the back side of the wheel when lined diverging.

Incidentally I seem to recall seeing similar single point switches on the street car lines in downtown Toronto a few years ago - I presume they are still present.

...FB
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Postby 3rdrail » Fri Jan 25, 2008 9:10 pm

Ok, as luck would have it, all my full trolley switches are on slides. (I've got to get myself one of those slide to digital converters !) I have some great Boston Arborway examples. But, this one should do. It's in Philadelphia. The PCC-2 is headed away from the switch, but you can clearly see one moveable point (on the left) with a stationary divider on the right:

http://i203.photobucket.com/albums/aa26 ... Switch.jpg
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Postby FarmallBob » Sun Jan 27, 2008 10:02 pm

3rdrail wrote:...The PCC-2 is headed away from the switch, but you can clearly see one moveable point (on the left) with a stationary divider on the right:

http://i203.photobucket.com/albums/aa26 ... Switch.jpg

That's it!! Looks just like the switches used throughout the Kodak Park RR.

Unfortunately cameras are prohibited inside Kodak facilities (go figure...!). So posting a photo of a Kodak RR single point switch would be kinda tough.

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Postby 3rdrail » Sun Jan 27, 2008 11:35 pm

FarmallBob wrote:Unfortunately cameras are prohibited inside Kodak facilities (go figure...!). So posting a photo of a Kodak RR single point switch would be kinda tough.

...FB


Pretend that you're a spy, Bob. :-D
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Postby 3rdrail » Sun Jan 27, 2008 11:53 pm

LCJ - Where did the switch in that photo come from ? I've been looking at it. It is very unique. Looks like solid bronze construction, and Farmallbob is correct in that it must have been used with double flanged wheels - you can see the grooves that they have made over time (I'll bet that flange grooves were cut into the switch when brand new however, to aid in directing the wheels). Bob thinks mine/oven. I'm going to go with amusement park ride.

Here's my next entry: a San Francisco Cable Car switch (pre-reconstruction), which is a one point switch, but pointed for the outer curved rail instead. The Cable Car system had a lot more really interesting "special work" years ago than it has now. A lot of it remained from lines that were abandoned with cross-overs, shared rail, and switches remaining at their point of union with remaining lines. With the 1982 reconstruction, they simplified track and got rid of unnecessary rail.

http://naphotos.nerail.org/showpic/?200 ... i&BOOL=ALL

Does anybody else have any unusual photos of unique switches that they would like to share ?
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Postby LCJ » Mon Jan 28, 2008 8:14 am

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Railroad_switch

Bottom of the page...

It's at a mining museum in Wales, I think. And yes, double flange. There are a few oddball switches on the page.

If in doubt, go to Wiki...
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